Hot answers tagged

1323

No; you don't cast the result, since: It is unnecessary, as void * is automatically and safely promoted to any other pointer type in this case. It can hide an error, if you forgot to include <stdlib.h>. This can cause crashes (or, worse, not cause a crash until way later in some totally different part of the code). Consider what happens if pointers ...


483

calloc() zero-initializes the buffer, while malloc() leaves the memory uninitialized. EDIT: Zeroing out the memory may take a little time, so you probably want to use malloc() if that performance is an issue. If initializing the memory is more important, use calloc(). For example, calloc() might save you a call to memset().


281

OK some answers about malloc were already posted. The more interesting part is how free works (and in this direction, malloc too can be understood better). In many malloc/free implementations, free does normally not return the memory to the operating system (or at least only in rare cases). The reason is, that you will get gaps in your heap and thus it can ...


266

This is probably due to your large allocation size. You might want to read up on how virtual memory works and OS theory. When you allocate a large enough region of memory (the threshold is often 1 MiB if memory serves), most allocators will get a new region of memory from the kernel using "mmap" just for that region. However, when "mmap" gives you new ...


240

A less known difference is that in operating systems with optimistic memory allocation, like Linux, the pointer returned by malloc isn't backed by real memory until the program actually touches it. calloc does indeed touch the memory (it writes zeroes on it) and thus you'll be sure the OS is backing the allocation with actual RAM (or swap). This is also why ...


235

Unless you are forced to use C, you should never use malloc. Always use new. If you need a big chunk of data just do something like: char *pBuffer = new char[1024]; Be careful though this is not correct: //This is incorrect - may delete only one element, may corrupt the heap, or worse... delete pBuffer; Instead you should do this when deleting an ...


222

You likely forgot to include <stdlib.h>.


201

In C, you don't need to cast the return value of malloc. The pointer to void returned by malloc is automagically converted to the correct type. However, if you want your code to compile with a C++ compiler, a cast is needed. A preferred alternative among the community is to use the following: int *sieve = malloc(sizeof *sieve * length); which additionally ...


200

Setting unused pointers to NULL is a defensive style, protecting against dangling pointer bugs. If a dangling pointer is accessed after it is freed, you may read or overwrite random memory. If a null pointer is accessed, you get an immediate crash on most systems, telling you right away what the error is. For local variables, it may be a little bit ...


189

Just about every modern operating system will recover all the allocated memory space after a program exits. The only exception I can think of might be something like Palm OS where the program's static storage and runtime memory are pretty much the same thing, so not freeing might cause the program to take up more storage. (I'm only speculating here.) So ...


188

From http://computer-programming-forum.com/47-c-language/a9c4a586c7dcd3fe.htm: In pre-ANSI C -- as described in K&R-1 -- malloc() returned a char * and it was necessary to cast its return value in all cases where the receiving variable was not also a char *. The new void * type in Standard C makes these contortions unnecessary. To save ...


164

You need to add: #include <stdlib.h> This file includes the declaration for the built-in function malloc. If you don't do that, the compiler thinks you want to define your own function named malloc and it warns you because: You don't explicitly declare it and There already is a built-in function by that name which has a different signature than ...


157

You do cast, because: It makes your code more portable between C and C++, and as SO experience shows, a great many programmers claim they are writing in C when they are really writing in C++ (or C plus local compiler extensions). Failing to do so can hide an error: note all the SO examples of confusing when to write type * versus type **. The idea that it ...


151

The answer is right there in the man page (at least on Linux): RETURN VALUE The alloca() function returns a pointer to the beginning of the allocated space. If the allocation causes stack overflow, program behaviour is undefined. Which isn't to say it should never be used. One of the OSS projects I work on uses it ...


135

Short Answer: It doesn't, it just happens to be zero in your case.(Also your test case doesn't show that the data is zero. It only shows if one element is zero.) Long Answer: When you call malloc(), one of two things will happen: It recycles memory that was previous allocated and freed from the same process. It requests new page(s) from the operating ...


126

Simple logic: If you do not park in a legal parking space, nothing might happen but occasionally your car might get towed and you might get stuck with a huge fine. And, sometimes, as you try to find your way to the pound where your car was towed, you might get run over by a truck. malloc gives you as many legal parking spots as you asked. You can try to ...


122

One of the most memorable bugs I had was to do with an inline function that used alloca. It manifested itself as a stack overflow (because it allocates on the stack) at random points of the program's execution. In the header file: void DoSomething() { wchar_t* pStr = alloca(100); //...... } In the implementation file: void Process() { for (i = ...


114

People (and especially beginners) should never use scanf("%s") or gets() or any other functions that do not have buffer overflow protection, unless you know for certain that the input will always be of a specific format (and perhaps not even then). Remember than scanf stands for "scan formatted" and there's precious little less formatted than user-entered ...


102

As other stated, it is not needed for C, but for C++. If you think you are going to compile your C code with a C++ compiler, for which reasons ever, you can use a macro instead, like: #ifdef __cplusplus # define NEW(type, count) ((type *)calloc(count, sizeof(type))) #else # define NEW(type, count) (calloc(count, sizeof(type))) #endif That way you can ...


91

Presumably you mean heap from a memory allocation point of view, not from a data structure point of view (the term has multiple meanings). A very simple explanation is that the heap is the portion of memory where dynamically allocated memory resides (i.e. memory allocated via malloc). Memory allocated from the heap will remain allocated until one of the ...


86

The variable e is a pointer to an array of n + 1 elements of type double. Using the dereference operator on e gives you the base-type of e which is " array of n + 1 elements of type double". The malloc call simply takes the base-type of e (explained above) and gets its size, multiplies it by n + 1, and passing that size to the malloc function. Essentially ...


81

The short answer is: don't use malloc for C++ without a really good reason for doing so. malloc has a number of deficiencies when used with C++, which new was defined to overcome. Deficiencies fixed by new for C++ code malloc is not typesafe in any meaningful way. In C++ you are required to cast the return from void*. This potentially introduces a lot of ...


77

Try char str[11]; scanf("%10[0-9a-zA-Z ]", str); Hope that helps.


75

One-argument free(void *) (introduced in Unix V7) has another major advantage over the earlier two-argument mfree(void *, size_t) which I haven't seen mentioned here: one argument free dramatically simplifies every other API that works with heap memory. For example, if free needed the size of the memory block, then strdup would somehow have to return two ...


74

One often-overlooked advantage of calloc is that (conformant implementations of) it will help protect you against integer overflow vulnerabilities. Compare: size_t count = get_int32(file); struct foo *bar = malloc(count * sizeof *bar); vs. size_t count = get_int32(file); struct foo *bar = calloc(count, sizeof *bar); The former could result in a tiny ...


72

Question: "is malloc reentrant"? Answer: no, it is not. Here is one definition of what makes a routine reentrant. None of the common versions of malloc allow you to reenter it (e.g. from signal handler). Note that a reentrant routine may not use locks, and almost all malloc versions in existence do use locks (which makes them thread-safe), or global/static ...


70

According to the specifications, malloc(0) will return either "a null pointer or a unique pointer that can be successfully passed to free()". This basically lets you allocate nothing, but still pass the "artist" variable to a call to free() without worry. For practical purposes, it's pretty much the same as doing: artist = NULL;


66

The sbrksystem call moves the "border" of the data segment. This means it moves a border of an area in which a program may read/write data (letting it grow or shrink, although AFAIK no malloc really gives memory segments back to the kernel with that method). Aside from that, there's also mmap which is used to map files into memory but is also used to ...


65

In C you can implicitly convert a void pointer to any other kind of pointer, so a cast is not necessary. Using one may suggest to the casual observer that there is some reason why one is needed, which may be misleading.


65

When you malloc a block, it actually allocates a bit more memory than you asked for. This extra memory is used to store information such as the size of the allocated block, and a link to the next free/used block in a chain of blocks, and sometimes some "guard data" that helps the system to detect if you write past the end of your allocated block. Also, most ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible