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0

Probably due to a limitation in the malloc function. Maybe you'll find your answer in This previous post. If you want an example of an obvious limitation, it will not give you more than the size of your RAM in terms of space.


0

Technically, you should not need to cast to (void *). Someone asked in a comment if any compiler gave a warning in the absence of the cast, and got the response "a broken one, perhaps". Well, gcc 4.8.4 seems to be broken in that case usr/include/stdlib.h:483:13: note: expected ‘void *’ but argument is of type ‘const char *’ extern void free (void *__ptr) ...


0

If you need to change the malloc for only some modules, or even part of modules, I would suggest to use a simple #define. This allows to restrict the use of the new malloc to some parts of the same module: ... #define malloc(x) MyMalloc(x) ... //From here on will be used the new malloc MyMalloc #undef malloc ... //From here on will be used the ...


1

Try linking in two steps. First stage: ld -r -o libwrapped.a --wrap=malloc myobj1.o myobj2.o -lsomelib Second stage: ld -o final -lwrapped -lsomeotherlib The -r option makes the first file (wrapped) relocatable, often called partial linking. Basically you make a library of all the objects you want wrapped, then link that with the ones you don't want ...


0

The concept behind void pointer is that it can be casted to any data type that is why malloc returns void. Also you must be aware of automatic typecasting. So it is not mandatory to cast the pointer though you must do it. It helps in keeping the code clean and helps debugging


1

This won't work. You assume your Type * has the same size as your Type which is most of the time not true. But, what do you need the row pointers for, anyway? My first implementation idea would be something like this: typedef struct TypeArray { size_t cols; Type element[]; } TypeArray; TypeArray *TypeArray_create(size_t rows, size_t cols) { ...


0

So, after the problem with the wrong declaration of head was resolved: free returns a previously allocated memory block to the heap. It does not clear anything (for performance reasons). However, you are not supposed to access that block anymore afterwards. Doing so results in undefined behaviour and might let your computer fly out of the window. Worst ...


0

Consider freeing memory as a black box. All what you know is that after freeing you shouldn't refer to freed memory. You may find that that memory block still exists and still contains some old values. That's ok: it just was marked as freed and probably it will be used again soon by allocator. For example when you call malloc again and realized that just ...


0

Yes, it allocates memory for the inner structure. And you need not free the inner structure separately. If you have a pointer defined inside your structure, in that case you have to allocate separately for that pointer member of the structure and free that separately.


0

as your code mbuffer.c, there is no mistake.I suggest you get a test of mbuffer.c for except your guess.


0

I was looking for this answer to. Finally I found something that works for me. Linker has --wrap=symbol option that you can use. Run man ld and search for "wrap", for details. I posted this in case that somebody finds this question but none of answers work for him, just as it was case with my self.


0

I understand that this exercise is just to exhaust memory, but even for that, you should try not to leak memory. Each time you successfully allocate a new block, you should store the address of previous one into it. So when you exhaust, you have a chain of blocks to deallocate. Code could be : int dis_mem(n){ void **mem; void **last = NULL; ...


0

You can always try, but it won't behave like you expect. The allocation is for i*j ints, and that is fine. But when you access p, and I'm guessing you're expecting to do p[x][y] will not do what you expect. p[x] has type int*, so the program will then look whatever memory address that is, and add y * sizeof(int) to that address and that's your value. See ...


0

As a general practice, you are better off allocating large blocks of memory using operating system services directly and managing them yourself, rather than relying on whatever malloc () does behind the scenes. Off the top a couple of reasons: 1) Malloc adds memory overhead. 2) Some malloc implementations do not handle huge chunks well. 3) Large ...


1

Allocating 1G of memory with malloc shouldn't be an issue in modern systems having several GBs of memory. Even if you go out of physical memory, this still will not be a performance issue until you start using that memory. Malloc simply reserves the virtual memory space, but actual memory allocation happens on the first access. Another plus for malloc is ...


-3

Try this #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> float **create_matrix(int h, int w) { float **matrix = (float **)malloc(h*sizeof(float *)); int i,j; for(i=0;i<h;i++){ matrix[i] = (float *)malloc(w*sizeof(float)); } for(i=0;i<h;i++){ for(j=0;j<w;j++){ matrix[i][j] = (i+1)*(j+1); } ...


2

Yes, of course. You seem to think about your string here as an immutable object which is a nice concept, but doesn't leverage you from freeing the memory occupied. If you know that the call to your function conceptionally invalidates the input string (so, no caller would ever need it again after calling the function), you could instead do something like ...


2

Say if I malloc space for a string and then update that pointer with another malloc (which uses the data from the first), is that a memory leak? Yes, if you do not store the 1st value of string, before overwriting it by the 2nd call to malloc(). Leaking code char * p = malloc(42); p = malloc(41); /* here the program leaks 42 bytes. */ You can ...


2

If you have two malloc calls and one free on the same pointer, you almost certainly have a leak (short of the first malloc failing). Every successful malloc should have an associated free somewhere at the end of the life of the pointer. Leak: foo* bar = NULL; bar = malloc(sizeof(foo) * 10); if (bar) { bar = malloc(sizeof(foo) * 20); } else { ...


0

The way I see matrix initialisation in C is this: 1.You allock N blocks-representing the lines 2.THen you go ot each line and say:ok,you are getting M values I know this is kinda redundant to what you just wrote but when you look at the 2 different ways of initialising a matrix you see the 2 main differences: malloc,just says here there will be ...


0

In C double **a; creates a pointer to a pointer and with a malloc you get a multi-dimensional array. This post details the reasons why you index from 0: Why Array index start from '0' This post details why you can't print the size of a dynamically allocated array in C. C, Malloc() and array length #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> ...


1

The loop in C should be for(i=0; i<=m+2; i++) Otherwise the first row will be left unallocated. After this change has been done, the java code is almost the same as the C code. Change malloc to calloc (for zero initialization of the allocated memory) to get the equivalent of the java code.


0

there is no way for you to do this, and is there any necessary to free half? it is not safe at all. Dynamically allocated memory must be free all.


1

NUMI does not have rows and columns, it is a pointer-to-pointer-to-int, and happens to be pointing at an allocated memory that has room for dim pointers-to-int, not dim * dim ints. This would be equivalent to treating as having been declared int* NUMI[dim] A call int* NUMI; NUMI= malloc( dim*dim*sizeof(int) ); will allocate a dim by dim matrix of ...


2

realloc() isn't required to copy and a good implementation avoids unnecessary copies. You should really rely on that. (to clarify: for performance reasons, of course. Always assume an implementation may take a copy) #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> int main() { void *test1 = malloc(16); void *test2 = realloc(test1, 8); ...


0

Call to malloc when succeed in returning a logically contiguous block of memory from your program's HEAP memory space just bit more than what you requested. This extra memory which is used to store information such as the size of the allocated block, and a link to the next free/used block in a chain of blocks. When you free your pointer, it uses that ...


1

Without using realloc it is impossible to do the task in the frames of the C Standard. There is nothing complicated in using realloc. Here is a demonstrative program that shows how it can be done #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #define HELLO_WORLD "Hello World" int main( void ) { char *s; size_t n = ...


1

The malloc(3) API doesn't allow this, other than with realloc(3). In common implementations, shrinking with realloc (usually?) won't trigger a copy, and esp. not if the buffer was large. If you really want to be able to guarantee non-copying, implement your own allocator on top of POSIX mmap(2) / munmap(2). You can unmap part of a mapping without ...


5

No, there is no way you can free() half or part of the dynamically allocated memory. You need to free() it all at a time. While getting the memory through dynamic memory allocation, you basically get a pointer. You need to pass the exact pointer to free(). Passing a pointer to free() which is not returned by malloc() or family, is undefined behaviour. FYI, ...


2

You should allocate memory for every dimension: NUMI = (int **)malloc((dim)*sizeof(int *)); for (i = 0; i < dim; i++) NUMI[i] = (int*)malloc(dim * sizeof(int)); PROB = (double ***)malloc((dim)*sizeof(double**)); for (i = 0; i < dim; i++) { int j; PROB[i] = (double**)malloc(dim* sizeof(double*)); for (j = 0; j < dim; j++) { ...


0

int main() { int **p; int m=4,n=4,i; /* Allocate memory */ p = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int *) * m); /* Row pointers */ for(i = 0; i < m; i++) { p[i] = (int) malloc(sizeof(int) * n); /* Rows */ } This will dynamically allocate an array with size [4][4]. Similarly it can be done to allocate for a 3-D array .


0

NUMI "is" an l+1 array of pointers to int. PROB "is" an l+1 array of pointers of pointers to double. This is closer to what you are looking for: #include <cstdlib> int main( int argc, char* argv[] ) { size_t dim = 100; int **NUMI = (int **)malloc( dim * sizeof(int*) ); for( size_t i = 0; i < dim; ++i ) NUMI[i] = (int*)malloc( ...


2

I think, you're facing problem in my_env[i] = NULL; This is off-by-one. The maximum index that can be used is my_env[i-1] = NULL; Also, please see why not to cast the return value of malloc() and family in C.


0

The only thing is worth substituting is free(), the C standard doesn't say that after freeing the memory the pointer has to be NULLed; #define SAFE_FREE(m) \ { \ if(m) \ { \ free(m); \ m = NULL; \ } \ } A good practice is to NULL the freed ...


2

The correct way in C would be to never define an malloc_string() in the first place, it just introduces an unnecessary (and, hopefully optimized-away) function call. Just do this: a = malloc(4); See also Do I cast the result of malloc? Apart from that, your argument type is wrong, it must be size_t, not int (and your compiler should warn you about this, ...


3

Neither: both are terrible. Don't have stub functions for malloc since your code becomes less clear to folk reading your code. (malloc is a standard function and everyone knows what it does.) And don't cast malloc on the right hand side of =: it's bad programming style since (i) you are repeating yourself and (ii) someone refactoring your code might change ...


2

To answer this question, TL;DR, any one. Both are OK. To nitpick, NONE, because Both the methods lack error check. What's the use of the wrapper then? 1.1. If I pass string_size as a -ve value, malloc() will blow up. 1.2. malloc() failure (or, success) should be checked before using the returned pointer. Please see why not to cast the return value of ...


1

You asked: Now, will using char * block = new char[1000000000] require additional memory to store the pointers to each of the 1,000,000,000 elements in the array? Definitely not. From the C++11 Standard (Section 5.3.4 New) 5 When the allocated object is an array (that is, the noptr-new-declarator syntax is used or the new-type-id or type-id ...


0

If you use new to allocate an array of characters you will get an array of characters. There will not be additional pointers for each element. You just get a large contiguious area of memory similar to what you would get with malloc(). What new will do is allocate the memory and then call the constructor which in your case will do nothing of any ...


0

new[N] is reserving a little bit more than asked. It stores counter [N] at the beginning (to know how much destructors it needs to call with delete[]) and returns a memory block just after it.


2

In order for operator delete[] to work correctly with non-PODs, the size of the array (a single size_t) is usually placed at the beginning of the whole block, and the first object at the first appropriately-aligned address. For PODs, operator new[] (without an initializer) is generally the same as a malloc. With an initializer (again, with a POD type), the ...


2

On my Linux machine: Malloc //malloc.cc #include <cstdlib> int main() { char* block = (char*) malloc(1000000000); } Runtime: $ make malloc $ valgrind ./malloc 2>&1|grep total ==23855== total heap usage: 1 allocs, 0 frees, 1,000,000,000 bytes allocated New //new.cc int main() { char* block = new char[1000000000]; } Runtime: $ make ...


1

Short answer: #define INTEGER_STRING_SIZE(t) (sizeof (t) * CHAR_BIT / 3 + 3) unsigned long x; char buf[INTEGER_STRING_SIZE(x)]; int len = snprintf(buf, sizeof buf, "%lu", x); if (len < 0 || len >= sizeof buf) Handle_UnexpectedOutput(); OP's use of sizeof(unsigned long)*8 is weak. On systems where CHAR_BIT (the # of bits per char) is large (it ...


1

You want to know how many characters are needed to represent the largest possible unsigned long. Correct? To that end, you are trying to calculate the largest possible unsigned long: sizeof(unsigned long)*8 That is faulty in several ways. For one, sizeof returns multiples of char, which need not be 8 bit. You should multiply with CHAR_BIT (from ...


3

Don't even try to calculate the buffer size. Start with snprintf, which will tell you safely how many characters are needed. Then you know how many bytes to allocate to print safely. Since this is a few lines of code that you don't want to repeat again and again, write a function malloc_printf that does exactly what you want: In that function, call ...


1

No, this is not the right way to calculate the buffer size. E.g. for 4 byte unsigned longs you have values up to 2^32-1 which means 10 decimal digits. So your buffer needs 11 chars. You are allocating 4 * 8 = 32. The correct formula is ceil(log10(2^(sizeof(unsigned long) * CHAR_BIT) - 1)) + 1 (log10 denotes the decimal logarithm here) A good (safe) ...


1

The C standard doesn't put an upper limit to the number of bits per char. If someone constructs a C compiler that uses for example 2000 bits per char the output can overflow the buffer. Instead of 8 you should use CHAR_BIT from limits.h. Also, note that you need (slighly less than) 1 char per 3 bits and you need 1 byte for the string terminator. So, ...


4

If you're using a C++ compiler (and Arduino sketches are C++), you should probably prefer new. It's unlikely to matter for doing a simple int array but I'd leave C legacy stuff only for code that has to run in a C environment. There's absolutely no reason nowadays for C+ programmers to exist :-)


6

In C, you can't allocate memory by new, because there is no such thing. For C++, you may prefer new for couple of reasons such as: exceptions (unless you add (std::nothrow) explicitely) initializer lists (since C++11) better safety as it returns pointer of proper type (specifically not void *) cleaner syntax (but that is pure-subjective) See In what ...



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