New answers tagged

0

First of all, you allocate space for Chrom pointers, not the space for Chrom structures so I am surprised that child1[x].gene works without crashing but to only answer the questions posed as comments in your code, free(child1);//can i free the memory like this? free (child2);// will it automatically do all 'arrays'? child1 is an array of pointers and ...


1

child1 = malloc(num_nodes * sizeof(child1)); this is incorrect. You are allocating space for num_nodes pointers (child1 is a pointer to Chrom). You want to allocate space for num_nodes Chrom instances. Change it to child1 = malloc(num_nodes * sizeof(*child1));


1

This answer is only an interpretation of the standard, because I could not find an explicit answer in C99 n1256 draft nor in C11 n1570. The rationale comes from the C++ standard (C++14 draft n4296). 3.8 Object lifetime [basic.life] says (emphasize mine): § 1The lifetime of an object of type T begins when: storage with the proper alignment and ...


8

(This is not an answer, but an important note on anybody working with large datasets in Linux) That is not how you use very large -- on the order of terabytes and up -- datasets in Linux. When you use malloc() or mmap() (the GNU C library will use mmap() internally for large allocations anyway) to allocate private memory, the kernel limits the size to the ...


22

I believe that your problem is that malloc() does not take a long long int as its argument. It takes a size_t. After changing your code to define petabyte as a size_t your program no longer returns a pointer from malloc. It fails instead. I think that your array access setting petabyte-1 to 10 is writing far, far outside of the array malloc returned. That'...


0

// insert element using recursion Node *insetlinklist(Node *head,Node*mhead,int data,int position) { Node *newNode=NULL; // printf("%d,%d %d %x\n",position,mhead->data,data,mhead); if(position==0 && mhead->next==NULL && head->next==NULL){ newNode = (Node*)malloc(sizeof(Node)); newNode->next=NULL; ...


1

Well, I believe in C11 there is such a beast Defined in header <stdlib.h> void *aligned_alloc( size_t alignment, size_t size );


2

C11 introduces aligned_alloc which supports specifying an alignment. It's implementation defined which alignments are supported, but on POSIX it should be like posix_memalign(3), which supports any power of two that's a multiple of sizeof(void*). Also consider, if regular malloc suffices. malloc has an alignment of _Alignof(max_align_t) for all allocations. ...


0

Your string is not yet terminated with a '\0', so you can't call strlen on it: char * receive_response(SSL *ssl, BIO *outbio) { int bytes; int received = 0; char *resp; // add one extra room if 4096 bytes are effectivly got resp = malloc(4096+1); if (NULL == resp) { perror("malloc"); exit(1); } bytes = SSL_read(ssl, resp, 4096)...


0

You have not allocated enough memory. char *s = (char *) malloc(sizeof(char)); ... while( scanf("%79s",s) == 1){ You allocate 1 byte, sizeof char, and then read 79 bytes into that address. It will not go well for those other 78 bytes. The fact that anything works at all is pure luck of the draw; it only so happens that you're not using any of the ...


0

There are lot of redundancies in the code. First of all you are allocating only one byte for string s and reading a string into it which will cause a undefined behavior (mostly the cause of your problem). The same is true for a. which must be char **a = (char**)malloc(sizeof(char*) * SOME_CONSTANT); Next you are allocating one character at a time for ...


-1

The authors of the C Standard put far more effort into specifying behaviors which weren't obviously desirable than those that were, since they expected that sensible compiler writers would support useful behaviors whether or not the Standard mandated it, and since obtuse compilers writers could produce "compliant" implementations that were fully-compliant ...


1

The memory obtained from malloc can contain anything. It might contain zeroes or it might contain something else. The following example shows (on most platforms) that memory returned from malloc has not been set to 0: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> int main() { char *p; int i; for (i = 0; i < 1024; i+...


6

calloc guarantees you to have a zeroed memory chunk, while malloc not. Then it may happen that malloc does it, but never rely on it.


1

Then how come we cannot use sizeof or some other built-in function to find the size of a pointer array? Do not confuse language with library. sizeof is not a function, and malloc is not built-in. In C, sizeof is an operator, not a function. (Note that you don't need to declare it.) You can say things like: size_t size = sizeof(void*); because you'...


2

The pointer values are the same. When you assign primary to secondary, the two pointers point to the same address of memory allocated by malloc(). You may free either one of them (but not both). This is particularly useful in cases where you don't actually call malloc() or free() yourself. Consider the POSIX functionstrdup(), which copies a string to newly ...


4

Yes, free() will work on any pointer that holds an address that in turn was returned by any of malloc(), calloc() or realloc(). Although doing that is a little bit dangerous since you risk free()ing the pointer twice. Only one of the two shall be passed to free() and after you do you cannot do it again with either of them. It's a common practice to set the ...


0

Since you are looping many times, I think arguments about pages not being mapped are irrelevant. In my opinion what you are seeing is the effect of hardware prefetcher not willing to cross page boundary in order not to cause (potentially unnecessary) page faults.


4

Every memory allocation has to be tracked so that free() can release the space for reuse. In practice, that means there's a minimum memory size that's allocated; it can be 8 or 16 bytes for a 32-bit program and 16-32 bytes for a 64-bit program (it depends on the system and the version of the C library in use). When you allocate the one million integers ...


2

The system needs to do some housekeeping every time a user asks for some memory. That's should come in mind when just calling free with just your pointer suffices for the system to de-allocate its memory. So, in your first example, you request memory n times, while on the second just once. The memory that you intend to use is the same, but the information ...


0

When you use new[],delete[] these calls constructor and deconstructor,respectively.This means your class instances are initalized and deinitialized automatically but malloc and free do not call the constructor and deconstructor, respectively. So When you call free() for an object allocated with new, its destructor is not called, you may get memory leaks....


0

A similar difference exists between the free() and the delete functions. With free(), the object's destructor will not be called. With delete, the destructor will be called and the object will be properly cleaned up.


0

I had this issue due to a recursive call in a view controller's viewWillLayoutSubviews. I was invalidating the layout of a collection view causing an endless cycle of repeatedly laying out views.


0

Give your function a name that indicates it will use dynamic memory allocation such as: heap_getSomeStruct(my_struct **value) {} alloc_getSomeStruct(my_struct **value) {} etc...


2

I also need 'a1' to be a 2d array, so I did the following code (not sure if this is right): typedef struct B { int b1; } b; typedef struct A { b **a1; }a; The code provides valid C declarations, but there is no 2d array in sight. Member a1 of struct A is a pointer to pointer to struct B, which is not at all the same thing. If you truly want ...


0

Instead of messing around with 2D dynamic memory allocation, you can fake a 2D array with a 1D array. b *a1; a1 = malloc(sizeof(b) * width * height); for(i = 0; i < height; i++) for(j = 0; j < width; j++) do_stuff(a1[i*width + j]; //simulates a1[i][j] The only thing this requires is that you store your width and height values somewhere, ...


0

The standard library uses the heap before calling main so anything you do won't be on a clean heap. The heap implementation usually uses about 2 pointer at the starting of an allocation, and the total size is usually aligned to 2 pointers. The heap implementation usually uses a lot of bytes at the start of each system allocation, it can sometimes be close to ...


2

I thought that the heap was divided in pages and that the first call to malloc would have given a pointer to the first byte of the page of my process. So why if try to get q[-1] my process is not killed? Most likely because your malloc implementation stores something there. Possibly the size of the block. Then I've tried with another pointer p and I ...


0

A void pointer is a generic pointer and C supports implicit conversion from a void pointer type to other types, so there is no need of explicitly typecasting it. However, if you want the same code work perfectly compatible on a C++ platform, which does not support implicit conversion, you need to do the typecasting, so it all depends on usability.


0

let trimmedString: String = (address as! NSString).substringFromIndex(max(address!.length-1,0)); This is for getting last character from a long string


0

I tried this in playground and it worked fine let longString = "static/res/upload/headImage/2016-7-18/2d2f44bea6384d66828db17a5a7e3490.jpg,static/res/upload/headImage/2016-7-18/50269cabce1f48658ec449bc66594dbb.jpg,static/res/upload/headImage/2016-7-18/12d034621c2d4c238271b0a1abfd97a1.jpg,static/res/upload/headImage/2016-7-18/b3d3367470c843df894f8d967a5c3584....


1

You need to pass the pointer by pointer to b() as well. As it stands, calling b(pointer) cannot modify pointer in main(). Do it the same way you call a(&pointer) instead. Also, do not bother to call free() on pointers you know are null (when malloc has failed). It doesn't do anything.


0

The code mixes the indices. This *(*(dp+j)+i) = i*j; should be *(*(dp+i)+j) = i*j; As both dimensions are the same this is not relevant for the 1st snippet.


0

I just started C almost a year ago and you're not helping this guy one bit. I also wanted to use contiguous blocks of memory to make tensors, which are weird multidimensional objects. Think of three 3x3 matrices printed on 3 ortho faces of a cube. A big problem in C is that when you make a 3D array, arr[number][column][row], which would be "number" of "...


0

The line messageErreur= (char**)malloc(sizeof(char*)); changes where messageErreur points locally, only in the function. It does not change where the corresponding variable in the calling function points to. One easy way to fix it is to change the function slightly. char** imageMsgErr (char* msg) { char** messageErreur = malloc(sizeof(char*)); ...


2

Quite simply, to answer the question literally: p = new int[MAXROW][MAXCOL]; This allocates a 2D array (MAXROW by MAXCOL) on the free store and, as usual with new, returns a int(*)[MAXCOL] - the same type as decaying the 2D array. Don't forget to delete[] p;. The last part brings up the importance of std::vector. Presumably, you know the size of the ...


1

Since this is C++ I will recomend using std::array and std::unique_ptr Also when using malloc you should use free un-alloc or free the memory, if you use new you need to use delete; if you new[] you need to use delete[] #include <cstdlib> #include <memory> #include <array> #define MAXROW 3 #define MAXCOL 5 using namespace std; int main() {...


1

The literal question ” How to write the following code using new operator? … means something else than you think it means. The new operator is a simple allocation function roughly directly analogous to C's malloc, except the C++ new operator is replacable by a user defined one. You probably mean a new expression. Such an expression ...


1

In short, when we malloc huge chunk at a time and write few bytes into each page allocated, will it be allocated from free Physical memory available ? If it is allocated, it will be allocated from the system's virtual memory, and any given page of the allocation may or may not be resident in physical memory at any given time. That's how virtual memory ...


0

The OP code has undefined behavior. The array isn't used, so if you use -O2 (gcc), you are just printing a as it increments. Gcc generates: .L2: movq %rbx, %rdx movl $.LC0, %esi movl $1, %edi xorl %eax, %eax addq $1, %rbx call __printf_chk jmp .L2 It won't segfault, but the output will be quite boring. ...


2

You have to allocate the arrays on the heap with malloc. This code will allocate an array of pointers long how_many_strings; and for each pointer it will allocate a string long str_length. char** str = malloc(sizeof(char*)*how_many_strings); for(int i = 0; i < how_many_strings; i++) { str[i] = malloc(sizeof(char)*str_length); } The size is limited ...


4

Allocate the array dynamically via malloc(). #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main(int argc, char const *argv[]) { long a = 0; while(1==1){ char ** str = malloc(sizeof(char*) * a); if (str != NULL){ printf("%ld is good.\n", a); free(str); } else { break; } a++; } return 0; }


1

In your malloc(), you're allocating space for the pointer itself, and then assigning the value to point to that. The next line, you overwrite it. Assuming you need to use tokens as an array of the tokens after the lifetime of this function, what you're looking for is the following. You create the space for the string the token contains in the tokens array, ...


2

Lets take a closer look at these two lines: tokens[token_index] = malloc(sizeof(char*)); tokens[token_index] = token; In the first you allocate space for a pointer and assign it to tokens[token_index]. The next line you reassign tokens[token_index] to point somewhere different, losing the pointer returned by malloc. It's no difference than having an int ...


2

The real answer is: When you are compiling flex-generated .c source in Visual Studio, it doesn't include stdlib.h (where malloc defined as returning void*) and Visual Studio takes some own definition, where malloc returns int. (I think it's for some kind of compatibility) Visual studio prints: 'warning C4013: 'malloc' undefined; assuming extern ...


0

The problem is with your malloc statement. sizeof is used to determine the parameter size - in your case a hard-coded integer. The generated array is of size 4, which is exactly sizeof(20) instead of 20 integers which is 20*sizeof(int). It will be best to allocate the array statically if you know what size you need, see code below: #include <stdio.h> ...


0

You are taking input in char and doing arithmetic operations on it. Use this code, it will give you correct output. #include <stdio.h> int main() { int *value; value = (int *)malloc(20 * sizeof(int)); //float answer; int x; int y; for(x=0; x < 20; x++) { scanf("%d" , value + i); } for(x=0; x < 20; x++...


0

The expression sizeof(20) returns the size of an int (the literal 20 is an int), which is typically only 4 bytes. In other words, you are only allocating a single integer for your array. All access outside of that single integer will result in undefined behavior. You need to allocate sizeof(int) times the number of elements, if you want to dynamically ...


0

#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> int main() { char *names[6] ; char n[50] ; int len, i,l=0 ; char *p ; for ( i = 0 ; i <= 5 ; i++ ) { printf ( "\nEnter name " ) ; scanf ( "%s", n ) ; len = strlen ( n ) ; p = malloc ( len + 1 ) ; strcpy ( p, n ) ; ...


2

You don't need to allocate the array with mxMalloc. mxCreateDoubleMatrix already allocates the array. Once you have your pointer to this data (obtained using mxGetPr), you can then fill the array with the necessary values. double *out; // Allocate memory for the first output plhs[0] = mxCreateDoubleMatrix(1,N,mxREAL); // Get the pointer to the output data ...



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