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41

Don't roll your own, use these handy (and extensible) wrappers provided by Microsoft. For example: #include <msclr\marshal_cppstd.h> System::String^ managed = "test"; std::string unmanaged = msclr::interop::marshal_as<std::string>(managed);


29

Check out System::Runtime::InteropServices::Marshal::StringToCoTaskMemUni() and its friends. Sorry can't post code now; I don't have VS on this machine to check it compiles before posting.


28

Have you take a look at C++/CLI? Let me give a very short example. Here is the source file from a Visual C++ -> CLR -> Class Library project. It basically get Windows username and return it. Please note that, in order to get this compiled, you have to go into project settings and mark "Additional Dependencies" as "Inherit from parent" because we are using ...


27

C++/CLI does have a 'lock' class - all you need to do is declare lock variable using stack-based semantics and it will safely exit the monitor when its destructor is called, e.g.: #include <msclr\lock.h> { msclr::lock l(m_lock); // Do work } //destructor of lock is called (exits monitor). 'm_lock' declaration depends on which members ...


26

When not specified, C++ is unmanaged C++, compiled to machine code. In unmanaged C++ you must manage memory allocation manually. Managed C++ is a language invented by Microsoft, that compiles to bytecode run by the .NET Framework. It uses mostly the same syntax as C++ (hence the name) but is compiled in the same way as C# or VB.NET; basically only the ...


25

Basically, a ref class is a CLR class. It's the equivalent of class in C#. This creates a reference type managed by the CLR. If you want to make a class that's usable from C#, you'd normally create a ref class. (ref struct, by the way, does exactly the same thing, but with C++'s standard class vs. struct default accessibility rules.) Also, just for ...


23

You can easily do this as follows #include <msclr/marshal_cppstd.h> System::String^ xyz="Hi boys"; std::string converted_xyz=msclr::interop::marshal_as< std::string >( xyz);


21

Managed C++ is the version in VS2002 and VS2003. It had race conditions and other serious bugs, as well as being confusing. It's no longer supported. In VS2005, Microsoft introduced C++/CLI, which has also been accepted as an ISO standard. It's also supported in VS2008 and the upcoming VS2010. Both of them had the same goal, which is to create .NET ...


19

The problem was where the DLLs were located. c:\dlls\managed.dll c:\dlls\wrapper.dll c:\exe\my.exe I confirmed this by copying managed.dll into c:\exe and it worked without issue. Apparently, the CLR won't look for managed DLLs in the path of the unmanaged DLL and will only look for it where the executable is. (or in the GAC). For reasons not worth ...


19

The correct pattern is to just delete the object: delete fs; This will be translated into a call to Dispose() See this post for some of the details of what is going on under the hood. The advantage of this idiom is that it allows you to write: { FileStream fs(...) ... } And have the Dispose method called correctly ... equivalent to a using block ...


19

The ref syntax is a Microsoft extension used only in Managed C++. By the sounds of things you have flicked the /clr compiler switch on by mistake when creating your project. If all you want to do is to create real C++ programs, then you will want to revert that.


17

Assuming you mean C++/CLI (not the old Managed C++), the following are your options: (1) Mimic a using-Block with using automatic / stackbased objects: { SqlConnection conn(connectionString); } This will call the Destructor of the "conn" Object when the next enclosing block ends. Whether this is the enclosing function, or a block you manually add to ...


17

The C++/CLI array declare & initialize syntax is not dissimilar from that in C#. Here's an example... array<String^>^ myArray = gcnew array<String^> {"first", "second"};


17

First of all, there are really two Microsoft-specific C++ dialects for .NET: the older "Managed C++" (Visual Studio 2002 and 2003) and C++/CLI (Visual Studio 2005 and later). In C++/CLI, System::String^ is a .NET reference to a string; some authors call this a "tracking pointer" to compare and contrast it with a normal C++ pointer. As in C++, you can pass ...


17

or one of its dependencies That's the usual problem, you cannot see a missing unmanaged DLL with Fuslogvw.exe. Best thing to do is to run SysInternals' ProcMon utility. You'll see it searching for the DLL and not find it. Profile mode in Dependency Walker can show it too.


17

This worked for me: #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #include <msclr\marshal_cppstd.h> //.. using namespace msclr::interop; //.. System::String^ clrString = (TextoDeBoton); std::string stdString = marshal_as<std::string>(clrString); //String^ to std //System::String^ myString = marshal_as<System::String^>(MyBasicStirng); ...


16

The equivelent to a lock / SyncLock would be to use the Monitor class. In .NET 1-3.5sp, lock(obj) does: Monitor.Enter(obj); try { // Do work } finally { Monitor.Exit(obj); } As of .NET 4, it will be: bool taken = false; try { Monitor.Enter(obj, ref taken); // Do work } finally { if (taken) { Monitor.Exit(obj); } } ...


14

I am familiar with some Java and C# A callback is an event or delegate in those languages - a way to get your code run by somebody else's code in it's context. Hence, the term "callback": You call some other piece of code It runs, perhaps calculating an intermediate value It calls back into your code, perhaps giving you that intermediate value It ...


12

Visual Studio (or the free version, Visual C++ Express) is a perfectly fine choice on Windows. On Linux, you'll probably end up using GCC. Both are fine compilers. Visual C++ supports both "real" native C++ and C++/CLI, the managed .NET version, so if you want to learn C++, simply create a regular C++ project. If you're concerned with learning "proper" ...


12

It is possible - the easy way is to add an AssemblyInfo.cpp file and put: #include attributes.h //your attribute decl [assembly: MyCustomAttribute()]; It can be in any file you want, though. edit - added required semicolon for assembly attribute


11

I had the same issue with a dll yesterday and all it referenced was System, System.Data, and System.Xml. Turns out the build configuration for the Platform type didn't line up. The dll was build for x86 and the program using it was "Any CPU" and since I am running a x64 machine, it ran the program as x64 and had issues with the x86 dll. I don't know if ...


10

If you are using the lastest WPF bits check out WriteableBitmap, you'll have to do more of the leg work but you'll really fast updates. Do a quick google and you'll get some samples.


9

<cstdint> If your compiler supports it, will get you int32_t, the C99 fixed width integer type. Never heard of no bool32 and I can't imagine what kind of sense it would even make. Yes, you can just replace int with your type so long as your type remains fundamental and/or has a default constructor/non-implicit constructor...depending on use.


8

How can they do that? Like most of the numerical libraries for .NET, NMath is little more than a wrapper over an Intel MKL embedded in the .NET assembly, probably by linking with C++/CLI to create a mixed assembly. You've probably just benchmarked those bits that are not actually written in .NET. The F#.NET Journal articles Numerical Libraries: special ...


8

Here are some conversion routines I wrote many years ago for a c++/cli project, they should still work. void StringToStlWString ( System::String const^ s, std::wstring& os) { String^ string = const_cast<String^>(s); const wchar_t* chars = reinterpret_cast<const wchar_t*>((Marshal::StringToHGlobalUni(string)).ToPointer()); ...


8

Here's some code I wrote* for aliasing (sharing memory) between a WPF BitmapSource and a GDI Bitmap (for my own project) Obviously, you'll need to tweak it for your own needs, it'll probably end up with a less "hacky" feel in the end. class AliasedBitmapSource : BitmapSource { private Bitmap source; public AliasedBitmapSource(Bitmap source) { this.source = ...


8

Visual Studio has a very good debugger. It has support for STL types (version 2008 is better) which will help you while debugging. Visual Studio insists with the Microsoft specifics from the very first console project you make (New->Project->Win32 Console Application) // test123.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application. // #include ...


8

C++ wrapper should be faster, have a look at this MSDN page: C++ Interop uses the fastest possible method of data marshaling, whereas P/Invoke uses the most robust method. This means that C++ Interop (in a fashion typical for C++) provides optimal performance by default, and the programmer is responsible for addressing cases where this behavior is not ...


7

The point about C++/CLI is correct. To complete the picture, just two additional interesting points: .NET memory management (garbage collector) obviously is not the problem here, as NMath still depends on it The performance advantage is actually provided by Intel MKL, which offers implementations extremely optimized for many CPUs. From my point of view, ...


7

String^ is a pointer to the managed heap, aka handle. Pointers and handles are not interchangable. Calling new will allocate an object on an unmanaged heap and return a pointer. On the other hand, calling gcnew will allocate an object on a managed heap and return a handle. The line username = "XYZ" is merely a compiler sugar. It is equivalent to username ...



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