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Yes, you actually can. Computer::with("users")->get(array('column_name1','column_name2',...)); Be careful though if you have the same column name for both tables linked by your pivot table. In this case, you need to specify the table name in dot notation, tableName.columnName. For example if both users and computer has a column name id, you need to do ...


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One way is to create a third table with two columns, one contains CountryID the other RegionID where these are respectively the unique identifiers of Country and Region. A row in this table means a relationship between a Country and a Region. As you can have more than one row in the table, you can store many-to-many relationships. If there is no ...


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You should have many-to-many relations from User to Survey, from User to Feedback, from Question to Survey and from Question to Feedback. As for querying all feedback from a user, it is simple: var feedbackFromUser = session.Query<Feedback>().Where(f => f.User.UserID == userID).ToList();


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You will make it a @manytomany on a List. Use Jointable etc., annotations to get this thing done. Please refer to the solution here


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1. Make TableA.CId and TableB.CId both FKs to Table C.ID. 2. Add a unique index in TableA on columns AId and CId. 3. Add a unique index in TableB on columns BId and CId. 4. Add a CId column to TableM. 5. Then Add two FKs in Table M, a. One using columns (AId, CId) pointing to Unique composite Index in Table A, and b. the other using columns (BId, ...


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It doesn't really make that much difference whether you specify a many-to-many relationship on one table or the other given that the relationship is always represented by a third table. You may wish to experiment with a few code samples to see if either representation appears to make your code more readable.


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Why would you choose a ManyToManyField when you don't actually want a many-to-many relationship? Since they require a linking table, they are significantly less efficient than a ForeignKey which is a simple join between tables. Don't use them unless you actually need the functionality.


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The change tracker of DB context only holds information on changed entities, and not on changed relationships. You were on the right way when trying to use the ObjectStateManager, and someone has doen it successfully: Entity Framework 4.1+ many-to-many relationships change tracking


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Is 'Marca boject id' the primary key? usually you don't modify the primarykey, if you do so, then you can expect the related data to be removed(if Cascade=all). I'd suggest you pull the child collections(Eager load) when you are trying to update the Marca object Id and save it to the db again with new id. (ofcourse you have to delete the data with old ...


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I think this should work: SELECT * FROM account_character ac INNER JOIN account a ON ac.Account_ID = a.ID INNER JOIN character c on ac.Character_ID = c.ID WHERE account.Username = ? AND account.Password = ? ; We start by joining together all the relevant tables, and then filter to get characters just for the current user.


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In case someone comes across the same issue, my solution is to make url the primary key in product table(not sure whether its a good idea). Thus before I start all the insert operations, I know all the keys i have before hand. I then issue two insert update on duplicate(note this step can be done in one sql statement): INSERT INTO product (url,name, ...


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select distinct t.id, t.name from ( select distinct entity_id from entity_tag where tag_id in (1, 2, 3) ) e inner join entity_tag et using (entity_id) inner join tag t on t.id = et.tag_id The subselect gets all entities that have at least one of the supplied tags. Then it is joined to entity_tag to get all ...


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SELECT id FROM tag WHERE EXISTS (SELECT id from entity_tag)


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TypedQuery<MyEntity> query = em.createQuery("select me from MyEntity me" + " where :anotherentity member of me.anotherEntities", MyEntity.class);


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When people use an ORM like EF in their application, many times the application design gets driven by this ORM and the entities defined in its model. When the app is a simple "CRUD" application, that's not a problem, but an advantage, because you spare a lot of time. However when things start to get more complicated, an "ORM guided design" becomes a ...


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Question 1: You're using the JPA annotations here with hibernate. JPA requires the primary key to be wrapped up in a type if you want to get by Id. For most of your entities you're using a standard Java type such as long. In this case though you've got a compound primary key (it's made up of more than one field). This means you have to create a custom type ...


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If you need to map composite keys as primary keys then indeed you will need to create the StockCategoryId class, since the two integers together are your primary key. The id class needs to be annotated with @Embeddable: @Embeddable class StockCategoryId implements Serializable { Integer stockId; Integer categoryId; } while your entity will now have a ...


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I would think the basic design should be "Every Model class should have its own DAO class that has all the methods defined, that operate on that particular model". This includes all getters too. DAO methods are based on model. So, you need to put all the getter methods for the Stock in the StockDAO class. And you can define the RowMapper class as a inner ...


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First thing is you should not create a map for mapping a List<A> to a List<B>. You should just create a map from A to B--automapper knows how to map a List<A> to a List<B> if you give it a map from A to B. This means your map should be: Mapper.CreateMap<Cust_ProfileTbl, EFWeb.ViewModels.Profile>(); Second, automapper will not ...


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It is always bet to initialize your maps inside of the startup entry point of the app. In an MVC project this would be in the global.asax and in a WPF application it would be the app.xaml.cs file. If we were initializing in the global.asax, it would look something like this: protected void Application_Startup() { Mapper.CreateMap<Cust_ProfileTbl, ...


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This isn't technically an answer, but it's too long for a comment, and it needs to be said. It looks like you're trying to abstract some of the Entity Framework stuff, but this is the absolutely wrong way to go about it. In one of my projects, for example, I have a service that abstracts away Entity Framework from the rest of my application and here's some ...


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Mapping you created is Normal but use of Include depends upon its usage Use of Include depends on situation of use for example if you want to cache it in memory then you may use include, Where as if you are using only showing properties of Cust_ProfileTbl class in some grid and on click you want show details of Cust_ProfileFamilyTbl then you might don't ...


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OK, here it goes, since the other answer is still wrong. First off, wherePivot won't work in whereHas closure. It's BelongsToManys method and works only on the relation object (so it works when eager loading). $data = ModelA::with(['relation' => function ($q) use ($someDate) { $q->wherePivot('created_at', '>', $someDate); // or // ...


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You are using Eager Loading Constraints, which constrain only, like you said, the results of the related table. What you want to use is whereHas: $data = ModelA::whereHas('ModelB' => function ($q) { $q->wherePivot('test', '=', 1); })->get(); Be aware that ModelB here refers to the name of the relationship.


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Ok well I can conclude the my issue was caused by the way I was handling the session and commit after the save and update. I was closing the session then recreating it within multiple methods in my custom membership library code. For example, each method I was calling I was wrapping it around a using statement for the session and transaction. I should have ...


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@216 got me on the right track with the first suggestion, but because a City can exist in more than one State I needed to tweak the statement slightly: int customersCount = db.Customers.Count(c => c.City.States.Any(s => s.Name == "Texas"));


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You could do something like this: int CustomersCount=db.Customers.Count(c=>c.City.State.Name=="Texas"); or var cities = db.Cities.Where(c => c.States.Any(s => s.Name == "Texas")); int customersCount=Customers.Count(d=>cities.Any(x=>d.CityID==x.CityID);


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1. I recommend using surrogate keys. I find it helpful to separate the database identity of a record from it's business identity. If the two concepts are mixed, it may be cumbersome to model them right and to remodel them later. You reference some good answers, so you are probably aware of the major up- and downsides, no need to reiterate them here. One ...


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You should write custom validation, which is quite easy (please adapt to your code): class Course < ActiveRecord::Base has_and_belongs_to_many :teachers validate :has_one_teacher_at_least def has_one_teacher_at_least if teachers.empty? errors.add(:teachers, "need one teacher at least") end end end That way, you'll only be able ...


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try this : ->add('AttName', 'sonata_type_model', array('multiple' => true, 'by_reference' => false))


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I got the solution through implementing StringBridge as below: @Override public String objectToString(Object value) { if(value != null) { String templateType = null; if(value instanceof Set) { StringBuilder strBuild = new StringBuilder(); Set<TemplateAttribute> setOfTempAttr = ...


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Map required both the one-to-many key and the map-key. In your first example, Hibernate figures out it needs a FK from Group.id to match the GroupUser.group_id to load the associated users. But because you don't specify a Map key it has to figure out where to take it from? So, Hibernate assumed you wanted a @MapKeyColumn and because the column name was ...


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I found my issue. I was creating a data access instance per object. So when DataAccess was saving, it didn't know about DataAccess. I changed the access layer so the methods take in a type and all is well.


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You have to use migration here. You can use south(for django<=1.6). BTW from documentation: Migrations are Django’s way of propagating changes you make to your models (adding a field, deleting a model, etc.) into your database schema. They’re designed to be mostly automatic, but you’ll need to know when to make migrations, when to run them, and ...


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You have to sync the database in order to reflect any changes you made to your models after the last sync. Just run python manage.py syncdb manage.py is your project directory.


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SQL Fiddle with v as ( select a.id as actor_id, a.name as actor_name, m.id as m_id from actor a inner join movie_brats mb on a.id = mb.actor_id inner join movie m on m.id = mb.movie_id ) select v1.actor_name as "Name", string_agg( distinct v2.actor_name, ', ' order by ...


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Your query's main problem, that you (cross) join movie_brats only once, so every actor will be printed by every movie (where he/she played) -- this is more obvious, if you change your query, to use inner joins (instead of cross joins + where). Tips: there is no need to join the movie table, unless you want print all movie titles by actor use distinct to ...


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What you need is has. And by the way, use eager (or lazy) loading in order to avoid n+1 queries problem. $role->load('categories'); // lazy load categories, for a single model works just like $role->categories; $roleId = $role->id; $role->categories->load(['questions' => function ($q) use ($roleId) { $q->whereHas('roles', function ...


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I would try with: OrganizationUser.where(user_id: current_user.id).joins(:user).where(user: {admin: true}).includes(:user).map(&:user) Get all the OrganizationUser matching current user, to get all its organizations Joins on the users table and select only admins (I assumed there's a boolean in the users table, change if it's different) Get the User ...


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You didn't say how you are defining admins, but assuming a simple admin boolean on the User model, you can query for all admins in the current user's organization like this: User.includes(:organizations).where('organization_users.organization_id' => current_user.organization_ids, :admin => true)


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You need to provide more information on what specifically you're trying to do. See below for an action that creates a profile with 2 roles, persists the profile (and roles), finds all profiles, logs the found profiles and their associated roles and then renders them as JSON: public class Profiles extends Controller { public static Result create() { ...


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No. That is not the correct way to go about it. You can model a many-to-many relationship with only one repeated property: class Person(ndb.Model): guilds = ndb.KeyProperty(kind="Guild", repeated=True) class Guild(ndb.Model): @property def members(self): return Person.query().filter(Person.guilds == self.key) def add_person(self, ...


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Transactional is a database think and mean: - If you have a update in a Database with more than one table the database-software do a automatically rollback if one part of the update dont work. Thats useful for bank accounts for example. To transfer money from one bank account to another you have to updates 2 items (update bank account 1 set money = money ...


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Collection Rails has a special piece of functionality which allows you to populate associative collections by using collection_ids. I can't find any documenation on this, but it's there because we've used it before: #app/controllers/posts_controller.rb class PostsController < ApplicationController def create @post = Post.new post_params ...


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The association itself will give you methods you can use. In your association a post will have a tag_ids method which you can give an array of tag ids. This means you can do this: <%= form_for @post do |f| %> <div class="field"> <%= f.label :tag_ids %><br /> <%= f.select :tag_ids, Tag.order(:name).pluck(:name, :id), ...


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Ok keep many to many field relation as you wish :). Just loop over CollegeSpecificCourseDetails object to get college,course and fees college_course = CollegeSpecificCourseDetails.objects.all() for college_course_detail in college_course: college = College.objects.filter(id=college_course_detail.college_id) course = ...


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As @DanielRoseman said, you really need to show your models. But it sounds like your confusion is rooted in having both a ManyToManyField between Course and College, and a separate College_Specific_Course_Details table. If I'm understanding you correctly, these are redundant. Instead, make College_Specific_Course_Details your M2M table by using the through ...


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Read this doc about association I debug instance all time then i have problem with this, he have custom name method (set[As]) for association children (if use option "as"): for(var method in company) { console.log(method); } i refused from "option.as" because you need all time write it instead dao model


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You have to change the names of these columns in the Entity Designer DDL script (which is generated from the EDMX file and has ModelName.edmx.sql name) before executing it. -- Creating table 'TownAuthor' CREATE TABLE [dbo].[TownAuthor] ( [TownID] int NOT NULL, [AuthorID] int NOT NULL ); GO


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You need to use cascade @OneToMany(cascade={CascadeType.ALL}) There are different cascade type. You can select the one that fits your requirement.



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