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93

I made a Markov chain chatbot for IRC in Python a few years back and can shed some light how I did it. The text generated does not necessarily make any sense, but it can be really fun to read. Lets break it down in steps. Assuming you have a fixed input, a text file, (you can use input from chat text or lyrics or just use your imagination) Loop through the ...


27

Yes, a Markov chain is a finite-state machine with probabilistic state transitions. To generate random text with a simple, first-order Markov chain: Collect bigram (adjacent word pair) statistics from a corpus (collection of text). Make a markov chain with one state per word. Reserve a special state for end-of-text. The probability of jumping from ...


15

Guy who wrote the article speaking. Glad you found it useful! Now, my first implementation of a Markov chain was actually in Python, so this answer will focus on how to write it in a more Pythonic way. I'll show how to go about making an order-2 Markov chain, since they're easy to talk about, but you can of course make it order-N with some modifications. ...


12

The obvious one: Google's PageRank.


10

You're looking for an implementation of markov chains for English sentences. A quick Google search for "markov chain sentence generator" returned: http://www.jwz.org/dadadodo/ http://code.google.com/p/lorem-ipsum-generator/ http://kartoffelsalad.googlecode.com/svn-history/r9/trunk/lib/markov.py


9

Hidden Markov models are based on a Markov chain and extensively used in speech recognition and especially bioinformatics.


9

Absolutely it is possible, and indeed the record of success in identifying an author given a text or some portion of it, is impressive. A couple of representative studies (warning: links are to pdf files): Quantitative Analysis of Literary Styles Stylogenetics: Clustering-based stylistic analysis of literary coroora To aid your web-search, this ...


9

Markov Model is a State Machine with the state changes being probabilities, Hidden Markov Model you don't know the probabilities but you know the outcomes. like when you flip a coin you can get the probabilities, but if you couldn't see the flips and someone moves one of five fingers with each coin flip, you could take the finger movements and use a Hidden ...


8

A while back I wrote a set of functions for simulation and estimation of Discrete Markov Chain probability matrices: http://www.feferraz.net/files/lista/DTMC.R. Relevant code for what you're asking: simula <- function(trans,N) { transita <- function(char,trans) { sample(colnames(trans),1,prob=trans[char,]) } sim ...


8

I would like to generate a random text using letter frequencies from a book in a txt file Consider using collections.Counter to build-up the frequencies when looping over the text file two letters at a time. How do I use markov chains to do so? Or is it simpler to use 27 arrays with conditional frequencies for each letter? The two statements ...


8

Try the following: %# sequence of states x = [1 6 1 6 4 4 4 3 1 2 2 3 4 5 4 5 2 6 2 6 2 6]; N = max(x); %# extract contiguous sequences of 2 items from the above bigrams = cellstr(num2str( [x(1:end-2);x(2:end-1)]' )); %# all possible combinations of two symbols [X,Y] = ndgrid(1:N,1:N); xy = cellstr(num2str([X(:),Y(:)])); %# map bigrams to numbers ...


7

I've seen spam email that was clearly generated using a Markov chain -- certainly that qualifies as a "business use". :)


7

The [0.83205029, 0.5547002] is just [0.6, 0.4] multiplied by ~1.39. Although from "physical" point of view you need eigenvector with sum of its components equal 1, scaling eigenvector by some factor does not change it's "eigenness": If , then obviously So, to get [0.6, 0.4] you should do: >>> v = ...


7

You could use bootstrapping to estimate confidence intervals. MATLAB provides bootci function in the Statistics toolbox. Here is an example: %# generate a random cell array of 400 sequences of varying length %# each containing indices from 1 to 5 corresponding to ACGTE sequences = arrayfun(@(~) randi([1 5], [1 randi([500 1000])]), 1:400, ... ...


7

You can visualize Markov chains like a frog hopping from lily pad to lily pad on a pond. The frog does not remember which lily pad(s) it has previously visited. It also has a given probability for leaping from lily pad Ai to lily pad Aj, for all possible combinations of i and j. The Markov chain allows you to calculate the probability of the frog being on a ...


7

The expressions S.dot(Q).dot(Q) and S.dot(np.power(Q,2)) are not the same thing. The first is the behaviour you desire, while S.dot(np.power(Q,2)) raises each element in Q to the second power. Documenation here. For a more compact notation than repeatedly chaining .dot(Q), use: S.dot(np.linalg.matrix_power(Q,n)) where n is the desired power.


6

We use log-file chain-analysis to derive and promote secondary and tertiary links to otherwise-unrelated documents in our help-system (a collection of 10m docs). This is especially helpful in bridging otherwise separate taxonomies. e.g. SQL docs vs. IIS docs.


6

There is a class of optimization methods based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. These have been applied to a wide variety of practical problems, for example signal & image processing applications to data segmentation and classification. Speech & image recognition, time series analysis, lots of similar examples come out of computer vision ...


6

Extending your own Markov chain generator is probably your best bet, if you want "random" text. Generating something that has context is an open research problem. Try (if you haven't): Tokenising punctuation separately, or include punctuation in your chain if you're not already. This includes paragraph marks. If you're using a 2- or 3- history Markov ...


6

Argh, you found the solution whilst I was writing it up for you. Here's a simple example that I came up with: run = function() { # The probability transition matrix trans = matrix(c(1/3,1/3,1/3, 0,2/3,1/3, 2/3,0,1/3), ncol=3, byrow=TRUE); # The state that we're starting in state = ceiling(3 * runif(1, 0, 1)); ...


6

Tuples are hashable when their contents are. >>> a = {} >>> a[(1,2)] = 'foo' >>> a[(1,[])] Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: unhashable type: 'list' As for collisions, when I try a bunch of very similar tuples, I see them being mapped widely apart: >>> ...


6

Okay, so I skimmed the articles to get a sense of what they were doing. Here is my overview of the terms you asked about: A Markov Chain is simply a model of how your system moves from state to state. Developing a Markov model from scratch can sometimes be difficult, but once you have one in hand, they're relatively easy to use, and relatively easy to ...


6

There are of course other ways to do this, but the distr package makes it pretty darned simple. (See also this answer for another example and some more details about distr and friends). library(distr) ## Construct the distribution object. myMix <- UnivarMixingDistribution(Norm(mean=2, sd=8), Cauchy(location=25, ...


5

Markov chains are used by search companies like bing to infer the relevance of documents from the sequence of clicks made by users on the results page. The underlying user behaviour in a typical query session is modeled as a markov chain , with particular behaviours as state transitions... for example if the document is relevant, a user may still examine ...


5

Make the user retype the secret answer one more time (as when you set new passwords). Also hide the typed-in-text as with passwords [input type = "password"]. This will make it impossible for them to copy the answer and paste in the retype field. So their best way out is to use a secret answer that makes sense to them. I don't think any algorithmic way of ...


5

There are some commercial Ray Tracing systems that implement Metropolis Light Transport (invented by Eric Veach, basically he applied metropolis hastings to ray tracing), and also Bi-Directional- and Importance-Sampling- *Path Tracers* use Markov-Chains. The bold texts are googlable, I omitted further explanation for the sake of this thread.


5

I know AccessData uses them in their forensic password-cracking tools. It lets you explore the more likely password phrases first, resulting in faster password recovery (on average).


5

Consider the following: %# number of states N = 11; %# some random transition matrix trans = rand(N,N); trans = bsxfun(@rdivide, trans, sum(trans,2)); %# fake emission matrix (only one symbol) emis = ones(N,1); %# get a sample of length = 10 [~,states] = hmmgenerate(10, trans, emis) The sequence of states generated: >> states states = 10 ...


5

Markov chains are simply a set of transitions and their probabilities, assuming no memory of past events. Monte Carlo simulations are repeated samplings of random walks over a set of probabilities. You can use both together by using a Markov chain to model your probabilities and then a Monte Carlo simulation to examine the expected outcomes. For Risk I ...


5

Neo4j doesn't provide the functionality you're asking for out of the box, but since you've already come as far as correctly populating your database, the traversal that you need is just a few lines of code. I've recreated your experiment here, with a few modifications. First of all, I populate the database with a single pass through the text (steps 2 and ...



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