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4

The source location is nil. Marshal.method(:dump).source_location #=> nil This means that it is a C implemented method, and there is no more Ruby code that you can trace. In other words, it is an atomic/elementary method. If you believe your result is valid, then I suggest you to post that as a bug in Ruby trunk. Several performance issues have indeed ...


3

You'd need a custom marshaller for this callback. But there is little point, you can simply marshal the array yourself: private static double CallbackFunction(..., IntPtr lptr, ...) { var l = new double[n + m]; Marshal.Copy(lptr, l, 0, l.Length); // etc... } Update the delegate signature to match. Do note that all the arrays are getting ...


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The VB6 Declare Lib only works for unmanged DLL exported functions. C# does not expose it's functions as unmanged functions, since it's managed code. The only supported way to exporting classes from C# is to use COM. So you can't use Declare Lib to access C# methods from VB6. There is a library that is supposed to create unmanged exports from your C# ...


2

You are trying to unmarshal XML as if it's JSON. First you do data, err := xml.Marshal(p) and then err = json.Unmarshal(data, &pXml) Line 46 in your code should be err = xml.Unmarshal(data, &pXml)


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You dont know the whole length for Marshal.Copy(), however you know the length of the first string if you perform Marshal.PtrToString(). With that knowledge you can advance to the next string and so on, until you read an empty string, that indicates only \0 was present at that address, which is the end of the multi string. Note that the following code ...


2

It's impossible to call that method with p/invoke. That's because you cannot marshal C++ classes using p/invoke. And string is, presumably, std::string. You'll need to either use a C++/CLI wrapper, or re-design the C++ interface to be p/invoke friendly.


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Because you are are marshaling, and by default, a char will get marshalled to an ANSI char instead of a Unicode char. So "balloon" is 8 characters, which is 8 bytes when ANSI encoded, plus 4 bytes for your int, which is 12. If you want the size to be 20 for marshalling, change your StructLayout and set the ChatSet to Unicode: ...


2

According to the documentation for the UnmanagedType Enumeration, if the string is a fixed-length character array that is stored completely inside the struct (which I'm guessing it is) instead of a pointer to a string stored elsewhere, you should be using UnmanagedType.ByValTStr instead of UnmanagedType.LPStr in the MarshalAs attribute for the Falconview ...


2

In XML representation both arrays and Lists have the same form. When unmarshaling an XML, JAXB will choose the type you have in your Java class. It's possible to unmarshal a collection to an array which was marshalled from a List and vice versa. Both arrays and Lists have their pros and cons. Use what is better for your purpose. In general List are easier ...


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A couple things to consider: A JAXB implementation will likely use a SAX or StAX parser to process the XML. As it can't easily know how many items will ultimately be present in the XML it will most likely put them items in a List first anyways and then convert it to an array. JAXB impls support multi-dimensional arrays but not multi-dimensional lists.


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Instead of: public static class JsonXmlAdapter extends XmlAdapter<XmlJsonEntry[], JsonObject> Do: public static class JsonXmlAdapter extends XmlAdapter<XmlJsonEntries, JsonObject> And then have XmlJsonEntries have a mapped property that is of type List<XmlJsonEntry>.


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Since no one answered and I already found out what was wrong I think I should answer it myself so that anyone that happens to end up here after googling have a easier time. It turns out you cant have a array starting at offsets that are not multiples of 4. On the example above, the QuestCompletationDataHeader is 10 bytes long, so on the ...


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Your question is about byte order not alignment. Byte order or endianness is about the weither or not he most-significant byte is first or last. Marshal.StructurePtr uses the byte order of the underlaying CPU because it assumes you want to call an unmanaged function. This may help you Marshalling a big-endian byte collection into a struct in order to pull ...


1

Yes, that's true. Since MarshallingWebServiceOutboundGateway allows to inject DestinationProvider, you feel free to provide any custom implementation. For your fault-tolerant use-case you should do: new URLConnection(url).connect() to test connection to the target server in that your DestinationProvider implementation. UPDATE But If I how can I test ...


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Your ref byte[] parameter matches unsigned char**. That's one level of indirection too many. The p/invoke should be [DllImport("somecpp.dll")] public static extern byte GetData( ref byte Data_Type, [In,Out] byte[] Data_Content, ref uint Data_Length ); It is plausible that the function uses cdecl. We can't tell that from here. I also ...


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First of all you should study the header file of the C library very carefully (I do not have a C header file for the dpc2lib). Please note I based my answer on the SDK documentation found here. Is the read_rb struct really defined with a data alignment on byte boundaries (you have set the Pack member of the StructLayout attribute to 1). If not you should ...


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In general, Bond has better type system and supports multiple protocols. In particular, pros are: Bond supports generics Bond has different types to represent collections: vector<T>, map<T>, list<T> Bond supports type-safe lazy deserialization (bonded<T>) Bond supports multiple formats (fast binary, compact binary, XML, JSON) + ...


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Are those 2 separate processes? (2 separate exes). If so, you are not going to be able to share memory via direct allocation due to Process Isolation (1 process cannot see another process's memory). Assuming that your answer is "yes" (2 separate processes), consider using Named Pipes to communicate cross process (or wrap it up with WCF) Interprocess ...


1

Yes, you can if you put the library on the inpath in a compile-time weaving scenario, creating modified versions of the 3rd party class files and using them during runtime. In a load-time weaving scenario you can also do it dynamically if the weaving agent is loaded before the Camel classes, which should usually be the case. As a work-around you can change ...


1

When queuing jobs its best to have some kind of Broker like a message queue or a job queue. Redis is a popular choice, as it can also be used for caching, and storing data in memory. RabbitMQ is another common choice. The nice thing about having a Broker is it can hold the job until a worker pulls it out of queue when ever it has available resources. A ...


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You probably should not be so concerned about speed; in my experience concerns like readability and maintainability are more important in almost all projects. For short-lived "remote procedure calls" of at most a few seconds, I would tend to use Apache Thrift, which has libraries for Javascript and the JVM (Scrooge is an alternative Scala implementation, ...


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Write and configure your own adapter? Just as you'd configure CollapsedStringAdapter? <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <jaxb:bindings version="1.0" xmlns:jaxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xjc="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb/xjc"> <jaxb:bindings schemaLocation="myschema.xsd" ...


1

You are dereferencing p with p = (IntPtr)Marshal.PtrToStructure(p, typeof(IntPtr)); and then at the end when trying to increment, all hell breaks loose. Use a fresh local so that the original pointer is not continuously dereferenced. Eg: for (int i = 0; i <= totalDevices - 1; i++) { IntPtr pp = (IntPtr)Marshal.PtrToStructure(p, ...


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Globals are not inserted into the Working Memory, consequently they are not saved with the KieSession's state. Globals have to be inserted every time you restore KieSession's state.


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You can create a specific structure to handle the JSON serialization message: http://play.golang.org/p/d057T7qfVB type Test struct { fieldA string FieldB int FieldC string } type TestJSON struct { FieldA string `json:"fieldA"` FieldB int `json:"fieldB"` FieldC string `json:"fieldC"` } func (t *Test) MarshalJSON() ([]byte, error) ...


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These structs vary on different architectures. The IntPtr values are 32 bits wide, or 64 bits wide depending on the architecture. That has obvious consequences for the size of the members, and perhaps less obvious consequences for alignment. There's no way that you can use the same struct irrespective of architecture. You need to be aware of the ...


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You cannot create Dynamic Link Libraries with c#. However, with a little bit of C++ you can create a bootstrapper for .Net dll's by leveraging the CLR hosting API. CLR Hosting API You can create a Dynamic Link Library in C++ with a method called something like "LoadPlugins". Write LoadPlugins to load the CLR (or a specific version of the CLR), then use ...


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Problem was incorrect format of strings. Switched the lstrcpynW to mbstowcs and it works now.



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