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89

Use anyListOf(Class<T> clazz): when(mock.process(Matchers.anyListOf(Bar.class)));


70

Two more ways to do it (see my comment on the previous answer by @Tomasz Nurkiewicz): The first relies on the fact that the compiler simply won't let you pass in something of the wrong type: when(a.method(any(Class.class))).thenReturn(b); You lose the exact typing (the Class<? extends A>) but it probably works as you need it to. The second is a ...


65

matcher.find() does not find all matches, only the next match. You'll have to do the following: int count = 0; while (matcher.find()) count++; Btw, matcher.groupCount() is something completely different. Complete example: import java.util.regex.*; class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { String hello = ...


41

assertThat (result, anyOf(equalTo(1), equalTo(2), equalTo(3))) From Hamcrest tutorial: anyOf - matches if any matchers match, short circuits (like Java ||) Moreover, you could write your own Matcher, what is quite easy to do.


41

The { and } are special in Java's regex dialect (and most other dialects for that matter): they are the opening and closing tokens for the repetition quantifier {n,m} where n and m are integers. Hence the error message: "Illegal repetition". You should escape them: "\\{\"user_id\" : [0-9]*\\}". And since you seem to be trying to parse JSON, I suggest you ...


37

Just ran into this post trying to fix it for myself. Gave me just enough information to work it out. You can give the compiler just enough to persuade it to compile by casting the return value from hasItems to a (raw) Matcher, eg: ArrayList<Integer> actual = new ArrayList<Integer>(); ArrayList<Integer> expected = new ...


34

marcos is right, but you have a couple other options as well. First of all, there is an either/or: assertThat(result, either(is(1)).or(is(2))); but if you have more than two items it would probably get unwieldy. Plus, the typechecker gets weird on stuff like that sometimes. For your case, you could do: assertThat(result, isOneOf(1, 2, 3)) or if you ...


31

You're the first to ask for such a feature. One way to achieve this is with withClue. Something like: withClue("NumberOfElements: ") { NumberOfElements() should be (5) } That should get you this error message: NumberOfElements: 10 was not equal to 5 If you want to control the message completely you can write a custom matcher. Or you could use an ...


29

It doesn't have to be regex. Since I think there's no standard method to handle this thing, I'm using something that I copied from somewhere (and perhaps modified a bit): public static Map<String, List<String>> getQueryParams(String url) { try { Map<String, List<String>> params = new HashMap<String, ...


21

The javadoc for FileSystem#getPathMatcher() has some pretty good examples and explanations *.java Matches a path that represents a file name ending in .java *.* Matches file names containing a dot *.{java,class}} Matches file names ending with .java or .class foo.? Matches file names starting with foo. and a single character extension ...


16

There is now an option to use Capybara matchers (without Webrat baggage) when testing controllers (and views too). I'm using it this way: describe GlobalizeTranslationsController do render_views let(:page) { Capybara::Node::Simple.new(@response.body) } describe "PUT :update" do before do put :update end it "displays a flash ...


15

I see this already has an accepted answer, but it is not fully correct. The correct answer appears to be something like this: .appendReplacement("$1" + process(m.group(2)) + "$3"); This also illustrates that "$" is a special character in .appendReplacement. Therefore you must take care in your "process()" function to replace all "$" with "\$". ...


15

This problem of identifying names is very culture-centric, and it really has no hope of working reliably. I would really recommend against this, as there is NO canonical form for what makes up a person's name in any country, anywhere on Earth that I know of. I could legally change my name to #&*∫Ω∆ Smith, and that's not going to fit into anyone's ...


14

describe 'Hash' do let(:x) { { :a => 1, :b => 2 } } let(:y) { { :b => 2, :a => 1 } } it "should be equal with ==" do x.should == y end end Passes. I'm not sure what's going on in your specific case. Do you have some failing examples you can share? Programming Ruby has this to say: Equality — Two hashes are equal if they have ...


13

hasItems checks that a collection contains some items, not that 2 collections are equal, just use the normal equality assertions for that. So either assertEquals(a, b) or using assertThat import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat; import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.is; ArrayList<Integer> actual = new ArrayList<Integer>(); ...


12

Change the leading and trailing '/' characters to '"', and then replace each '\' with "\\". Unlike, Javascript, Perl and other scripting languages, Java doesn't have a special syntax for regexes. Instead, they are (typically) expressed using Java string literals. But '\' is the escape character in a Java string literal, so each '\' in the original regex ...


12

Also, is there any way to optimize this regex? Yes, don't use regex for this task, use Apache StringEscapeUtils from Apache commons lang: import org.apache.commons.lang.StringEscapeUtils; ... String withCharacters = StringEscapeUtils.unescapeHtml(yourString); JavaDoc says: Unescapes a string containing entity escapes to a string containing the ...


11

Let's say your entire pattern matches "(prefix)(infix)(suffix)", capturing the 3 parts into groups 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Now let's say you want to replace only group 2 (the infix), leaving the prefix and suffix intact the way they were. Then what you do is you append what group(1) matched (unaltered), the new replacement for group(2), and what group(3) ...


11

Capybara currently does not work with view specs (there are plans to make it work in the future). The simplest answer is to just add gem 'webrat' to the Gemfile and you're basically set. You might not have have_button but you'll have have_selector, have_tag and similar available. Btw: as far as I know capybara and webrat can co-exist in one project.


11

By all means reuse the Matcher. The only good reason to create a new Matcher is to ensure thread-safety. That's why you don't make a public static Matcher m—in fact, that's the reason a separate, thread-safe Pattern factory object exists in the first place. In every situation where you are sure there's only one user of Matcher at any point in time, it ...


11

Yes there is. You can combine a negative lookahead and a backreference: "(\\[[^\\[\\]]*\\])(?!.*\\1)" That will only match if that, which was matched by your actual pattern, does not occur again in the string. Effectively, that means you always get the last occurrence of every match, so you would get them in a different order: [inputString] [userName] ...


11

Try the Underscore _.isEqual() function: expect(_.isEqual(obj1, obj2)).toEqual(true); If that works, you could create a custom matcher: this.addMatchers({ toDeepEqual: function(expected) { return _.isEqual(this.actual, expected); }); }); So you can then write specs like so: expect(some_obj).toDeepEqual(expected_obj);


11

This syntax works: expect(@line.filter_results_and_display_them).to eq @processed


9

Slightly simpler than Pawel's answer, but the gist is the same; the following works for me with rails 3.1.0, rspec 2.6.0, capybara 1.1.1: page = Capybara::Node::Simple.new( rendered ) page.should have_content( "blah" )


8

String.split does not use capturing groups as its result. It finds whatever matches and uses that as the delimiter. So the resulting String[] are substrings in between what the regex matches. As it is the regex matches the whole string, and with the whole string as a delimiter there is nothing else left so it returns an empty array. If you want to use ...


8

You are comparing ArrayList<Integer> with int. The correct comparison is: ... assertThat(actual, hasItem(2)); -- Edit -- I'm sorry, I've read it wrong. Anyway, the signature of hasItems you want is: public static <T> org.hamcrest.Matcher<java.lang.Iterable<T>> hasItems(T... elements) i.e., it accepts a variable number of ...


8

Use Matcher.group(int), not Matcher.group(). With the given regex and input, group(1) should be "1" and group(2) should be "23".


8

Not sure how you used find and group, but this works fine: String params = "depCity=PAR&roomType=D&depCity=NYC"; try { Pattern p = Pattern.compile("depCity=([^&]+)"); Matcher m = p.matcher(params); while (m.find()) { System.out.println(m.group()); } } catch (PatternSyntaxException ex) { // error handling } ...


8

What about simply String result = input.replaceAll("\"", "");


8

Your regular expression matches either a single digit, OR any single char that is NOT a word OR any single char that is a white space char. Any of those three alternatives must start at the beginning of the subject because you have ^ in each alternation. Based on your description, i think you want an expression like this: ^[\w#$]+$ Which will match ...



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