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8

The trick in these things is to look for common patterns and use existing efficient routines to speed them up. M.S.B is, as usual, completely right that just flipping your indices will give you substantial speedup, although intel's fortran compiler with high optimization will already give you some of that benefit. But let's peel off the m index for a ...


8

How about just leveraging the built-in functionality? > open System;; > let secs = 266521;; val secs : int = 266521 > let s = (TimeSpan.FromSeconds (float secs)).ToString "d\d\ hh\h\ mm\m\ ss\s";; val s : string = "3d 02h 02m 01s"


4

You can do a nested for loop. Below is what you want: for b in range(0, 56): for a in range(0, 57):


4

Since Fortran uses column-major ordering for the layout of multi-dimensional arrays in memory, memory access can be more efficient if you vary the left indices more quickly, i.e, inner loops for left indices. So if you change the order of the loops so that r is inside to s, etc. the code may execute quicker. The logic of the problem may prevent completely ...


3

Have you considered using libraries? There's Math::LP, for instance. See the Perl and Math tutorial from PerlMonks for more info.


3

Run this and see what you get (before you ask another question) for b in range(56): for a in range(57): print "a:", a, "b:", b Answer to question in comment: You can use b as argument in inner loop for b in range(56): for a in range(b+1, 57): print "a:", a, "b:", b you could try with smaller range to see all results on one ...


2

Save the values into an array: $data=array(); while (odbc_fetch_row($rs)) { $data[] = $this->DtReading = odbc_result($rs, "dtReading"); } $result = $data[0] - $data[1];


2

It's because the values are immutable (cannot change) in F#. Your value "leftover" stays at the value 7321, its first value. This is done to help with threading and data sharing. Either create a new value when changing the value of "leftover" or otherwise make the value mutable: let mutable leftover = sum % 86400 leftover <- leftover % 3600


2

Search for symbolic math on MetaCPAN. Lots of interesting looking options. https://metacpan.org/search?q=symbolic+math


2

If your line is thin and pixels are rectangular (square): then consider using of voxel grid traversal algorithms, for example, see article "Fast Voxel Traversal Algorithm..." by Woo and Amanatides. Practical implementation (in grid traversal section)


2

Instead of P1, P2 and P3, lets assume the points as A,B and C. A(10,30) / \ / \ / \ / P \ P' / \ B (0,0) ----------- C(20,0) Algorithm : 1) Calculate area of the given triangle, i.e., area of the triangle ABC in the above diagram. Area A = [ x1(y2 - y3) + x2(y3 - ...


1

My first suggestion would be to not define your Quaternion rotation using Euler angles: Here are some links that explain it better than I can: http://bitsquid.blogspot.ca/2013/03/what-is-gimbal-lock-and-why-do-we-still.html http://mathoverflow.net/questions/95902/the-gimbal-lock-shows-up-in-my-quaternions ...


1

If you need just constant color (not interpolated by used area of pixel) then use DDA: void line_DDA_subpixel(int x0,int y0,int x1,int y1,int col) // DDA subpixel -> thick { int kx,ky,c,i,xx,yy,dx,dy; x1-=x0; kx=0; if (x1>0) kx=+1; if (x1<0) { kx=-1; x1=-x1; } x1++; y1-=y0; ky=0; if (y1>0) ky=+1; if (y1<0) { ky=-1; y1=-y1; } ...


1

Per utrecht's suggestion, for future references: From the API here: http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-math/apidocs/org/apache/commons/math3/fraction/Fraction.html#doubleValue%28%29, Fractions have a member method doubleValue().


1

I'll add another answer here since it's vastly different than my other one. Starting from the result of regular path finding algorithms, run a stochastic optimization to maximize a fitness function that describes the "relatively straightness" (and shortness and other metrics if you so wish) of a path by adding vertices, moving vertices and deleting vertices ...


1

Run a Rapidly exploring random tree algorithm but restrict the exploration direction within a few degree of directions parallel to an axis, and by choosing a large incremental distance to keep the number of turnings low. Basically add any heuristics at your wish. Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees: A New Tool for Path Planning is a seminal paper on Rapidly ...


1

This is really more of a comment, but I cannot comment since it requires 50 reputation... Otoh, I don't think there is satisfactory answer to this question, since it is not welldefined. But +1 for an interesting question :-) The algorithm giving the red dashed line starts from the straight line between start and end point of your path (which isn't entirely ...


1

You get the X, Y coordinates by the given formulas: x = (index Mod width) y = ((index - x) / width)



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