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Strings of symbols that violate the rules of syntax are not well-formed and are not valid mathematical expressions. For example:

would not be considered a mathematical expression but only a meaningless jumble.

In algebra an expression may be used to designate a value, which might depend on values assigned to variables occurring in the expression; the determination of this value depends on the semantics attached to the symbols of the expression.

These semantic rules may declare that certain expressions do not designate any value; such expressions are said to have an undefined value, but they are well-formed expressions nonetheless.

In general the meaning of expressions is not limited to designating values; for instance, an expression might designate a condition, or an equation that is to be solved, or it can be viewed as an object in its own right that can be manipulated according to certain rules. Certain expressions that designate a value simultaneously express a condition that is assumed to hold, for instance those involving the operator to designate an internal direct sum.

Being an expression is a syntactic concept; although different mathematical fields have different notions of valid expressions, the values associated to variables does not play a role. See formal language for general considerations on how expressions are constructed, and formal semantics for questions concerning attaching meaning (values) to expressions.

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