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0

A possible way is to save some variables in an external file. Note that in this case a and b are only in the function workspace (you won't see their values unless you load the contents of test.mat separately). I'm passing the filename in rather than hard-coding it in case you need to switch between multiple settings. Personally I would prefer to have a ...


2

You can set defaults for the inputs: function y = foo(a,b) if nargin < 1 || isempty(a), a = 10; end if nargin < 2 || isempty(b), b = [5,6,7;1,2,8]; end y = b*a end You can call foo() without inputs (and it will use the defaults for a and b) or supply your own values as: foo(12), foo(12,[10,20]), foo([],[23,23]), etc...


0

The shading property does not apply to contourm and contourfm. If you do not want the lines between the different colour regions, add 'LineStyle', 'none' in the parameters of your contourfm function: contourfm(gLat, gLon, varh', 30 , 'LineStyle', 'none' ); and you can delete or comment your call to shading flat;


1

From Mathwork's website (see here in the DisplayRange section): Display range of a grayscale image, specified as a two-element vector [LOW HIGH]. imshow displays the value low (and any value less than low) as black, and the value high (and any value greater than high) as white. Values in between are displayed as intermediate shades of gray, using the ...


0

Consider the following example sparse matrix: x = sparse(10,1); x(3) = 0.04546236; x(7) = 1.726; x(8) = 0.63; Then [row, col, val] = find(x); gives row = 3 7 8 val = 0.0455 %// this appears rounded, but the correct value is stored 1.7260 0.6300 So: str = strcat(num2str(row), ':', num2str(val), {' '}); str = [str{:}]; str ...


4

Another workaround is to copy the full axes object (so all the properties come along) into a new figure. The only property you have left to set yourself is the position according to the rules of subplot(xyz). To start with your example : [f1,a1] = myPlot('Plot #1'); [f2,a2] = myPlot('Plot #2'); Then copy the axis of each figure into the new figure h4 = ...


1

One possible workaround could be the following, not really generic though. Would be interested in a solution solving the original problem. If it is possible to modify the myPlot function one could pass the figure handle and subplot specifier and plot everything correctly from the beginning. function [ fig_handle, axes_handle ] = myPlot(fig_handle, sub, ...


1

This problem is caused by how matlab renders objects for saving. One thing you could try is the HG2 update to MATLAB (link). It is a MAJOR improvement to how visually appealing graphics are, however it can cause matlab to crash. A workaround that you might find good enough is to add a marker plot for each data line. such as ...


2

If you work in Windows, the good option is to export to a windows meta file (.emf) instead of jpeg: print -dmeta figure1 Additionally, it looks much better in MS Office documents (vector format). You can always convert emf to jpeg if required.


0

The reason why ylim doesn't work if you put it before the plot command is that there is no axes object it can relate to. So there are two options: First, you create an axes object and hold it with hold on, so the upcoming plot is plotted on the same axis. ax = axes; hold on; ylim([0, 1.2]) plot(tau,NSS1,'-k*',tau,NSS2,'-k+',tau,NSS3,'-ko'); or second, ...


2

Here is a very custom way using text annotations. You might need to add some minor changes to fit your data. clc clear x = 1:80; HourValues = repmat([0 10 20],1,3); DaysString = {'Mon' 'Tue' 'Wed'}; NumDays = numel(DaysString); plot(x,rand(1,80)) set(gca,'XTickLabel',HourValues) % Set xtick labels xlimit = get(gca,'XLim'); % Get x and y- limits ylimit ...


2

Not sure about the days, but I have a suggestion for the hours. Imagine the following: hours = 0:70; data=rand(size(hours)); plot(hours,data,'*') xlabel('Hours of day') This gives the following plot: Now you need to edit the labels used by the x-axis. Here's one way to do it (not necessarily the most elegant because you are dealing with cell arrays and ...


1

It looks like you want to perform 2 sample (paired) t-test, in which case you want to use the ttest2 function. It's quite easy to compute: Without much information about your data I re-arranged them into single row vectors for comparisons. The code I use is straightforward: clear clc % Define experimental data. Cond1 = [-8 2 -1 3 -1 -1 -1 -2 ...


1

If you don't mind changing your plotting code slightly, you could use datetick, which converts the labels on a given axis to dates. You can do the following x = 1:1440; y = rand(1,1440); plot(x/1440,y); % dividing minutes by 1440 is the same as converting to datenum datetick('x','HHPM'); datetick also gives you the option to 'keeplimits' or 'keepticks', ...


0

An option would respect your original tick location but convert them to the format you want: set( gca , 'XTickLabel' , datestr( (get(gca,'XTick')/1440) , 'HH:MM PM' ) ) You can look the datestr help page to see all the other formats you can use (if you want to remove the display of the minutes for example). Note: Be aware that this will only change the ...


2

labels = {'12 AM', '1 AM', '2 AM', '3 AM' ... '4 AM', '5 AM', '6 AM', '7 AM' ... '8 AM', '9 AM','10 AM','11 AM'... '12 PM', '1 PM', '2 PM', '3 PM' ... '4 PM', '5 PM', '6 PM', '7 PM' ... '8 PM', '9 PM','10 PM','11 PM'}; set(gca, 'xtick', 1:60:1440); set(gca, 'xticklabel', labels);


1

What happens if you offset the height variable in the show_text function by a larger arbitrary factor like this: height = length(outstring) * 1.5 * font size; Instead of 1.1? Or try 2.


1

Not a direct answer to your question, but I'd strongly recommend PsychToolbox for this... There are many problems with using the matlab figure for experiments... The problem you describe is just one of many, and that's why PsychToolbox, cogent etc. were written -- and they do make it easier to code this kind of task.


2

cc=hsv(870); for current = 1: 870 hold on; plot(x,y(current,:),'color',cc(current,:)); pause(); end You can try this. Use a colormap such as HSV to create a set of colors.


3

At each angle, the number of bars varies depending on how many measurements exist for that angle. bar3 needs a matrix input. In order to build a matrix, missing values are filled with NaN. Warning: NaNs are usually ignored by plotting commands, but bar3 apparently breaks this convention. It seems to replace NaNs by zeros! So at missing values you'll get a ...


0

An alternative solution is to reference the axes within the plot command (instead of changing the current figure before plot): a=1:10; b=-a; f = figure('visible','off'); fax = gca; %// get handle to axes of figure f g = figure('visible','off'); gax = gca; %// get handle to axes of figure g plot(fax, a) %// plot in axes of figure f saveas(f,'newout','fig') ...


4

I just learned that instead of calling figure(f) one should use set: set(0, 'currentfigure', g); This will change the current figure handle without changing its visibility. The corrected version works as expected: a=1:10; b=-a; % make invisible plot window f = figure('visible','off'); g = figure('visible','off'); % figure makes the plot visible again ...


0

I would suggest making a whole new plot window. By doing that you will get two different plots, and as you say that only one plot works, i think it could work.


0

This is regarding the legend part of your question: In order to have a single legend entry for several, separately-plotted items (the more accurate term would be "children of the axes object"), you should use hggroup. This way, plotted objects (such as lines) are grouped together (technically they become children of the hggroup instead of being children of ...


3

I see two options here: 1. concatenate to the same plot and pad with NaNs to obtain the gap. 2. actually have several plots and use axes in a clever way. Here's an example for option 1, First we'll create some fake data: a1=rand(1,20); b1=3+rand(1,20); c1=6+rand(1,20); a2=rand(1,20); b2=3+rand(1,20); c2=6+rand(1,20); a3=rand(1,20); b3=3+rand(1,20); ...


2

You could use something like %cirlce def circx = sin(linspace(0,2*pi,100)); circy = cos(linspace(0,2*pi,100)); %example data [mgx mgy] = meshgrid(5:5:100, 5:5:100); x = reshape(mgx,[],1); %circles centers x y = reshape(mgy,[],1); %circles centers x r = 2.5*rand(400,1); %radii c = 250*rand(400,1); %colors % draw figure hold on for i=1:numel(x) ...


0

You can access the Index value using the output you get when you load the image, for instance if you store the image data in a structure called s: s = load('clown') s = X: [200x320 double] map: [81x3 double] caption: [2x1 char] Pixel values are stored in X, whereas the associated colormap is stored in map. Since indices in Matlab ...


0

Look at imsave. It allows you to save the content of a figure using its handles: imsave(Figure_handles)


3

You can use the option to directly insert vertices to streamtube w = sqrt( px.^2 + py.^2 + pz.^2 ); hh = streamtube( { [xx; yy; zz]' }, {w'} ); set( hh, 'EdgeColor', 'none' ); Here's what you get


2

Generally, this is one way to do it: %// example data rng(0,'twister') data = randn(1000,3); x = linspace(-4,4,100); y = 16 - x.^2; %// generate two axes at same position ax1 = axes; ax2 = axes('Position', get(ax1, 'Position'),'Color','none'); %// move second axis to the right, remove x-ticks and labels set(ax2,'YAxisLocation','right') set(ax2,'XTick',[]) ...


3

Usually streamtube and streamline works on vector fields, in particular in MATLAB they works only for structured meshes (i.e. those generated by meshgrid). What you have is an unstructured vector field, but since you have a set of trajectories you actually have already the streamlines computed, indeed the trajectory are streamlines (you defined the vector ...


0

Your question is too specific, but to give you an idea. Images in Matlab are saved as a matrix so you have a column and row of values. You can alter or access a column or a row of an image easily using the : operator. For instance, to get the first row of data you can do img(1,:), that is to mean all elements in the first row. I hope with this hint you ...


1

You likely need to use this line: set(gcf,'PaperPositionMode','auto') to make sure Matlab does not resize the figure. If it does not work please show the code you use.


1

Since MATLAB uicontrols have underlying Java Swing GUI controls, I can think of two "Java solutions": Associate a FocusGainedCallback with the Java object of editbox (using FindJObj - see below) (and possibly other UI elements), and update some handle \ persistent \ global variable from this function to hold the currently focused object handle. This type ...


0

If you have the current figure open, you can try the getframe idiom. Once you have access to this, you can access the frame's image data by looking at the cdata field in the structure. After you have this, you can use the imwrite command from MATLAB's image processing toolbox (let's hope you have it...) to write the image to file. Here's an example: x = ...


2

You're probably just seeing the edges around the color pixels. As this answer points out, the easy solution is to remove the edges. This is relatively easy: h = pcolor(X,Y,C); set(h, 'EdgeColor', 'none')


2

Since pcolor gives You a 'checkboard' style of plot the lines separating neighboring elements can get too dense for high resolutions and shade the original picture. I'd suggest using imagesc instead: % working example % x = -1:0.0075:1; [X Y] = meshgrid(x,x); g = exp(-X.^2 - Y.^2); close all % can't see a thing with pcolor ' figure pcolor(g) % clear and ...


1

As suggested in this post: To get all 'line' objects on the current set of axes: lines = findobj(gca, 'type', 'line'); For patches, it's similar. What was also helpful was displaying the types of objects under the current axes. For example: >> mesh(magic(5)) >> get(findobj(gca), 'type') ans = 'axes' 'surface' If there are many ...


1

I would personally use subplot or figure and hold all in this situation. Therefore, your code would look like: clc;clear; a = [ 1.8 2.5 6.4 ] ; % acceleration t = 0:.01:15 ; n = 1 ; figure; while n < 4 velocity = a(n)*t ; position = 0.5*a(n)*t.^2 + velocity.*t ; figure(1);plot(t,velocity); hold all; figure(2);plot(t,position); n = n + 1 ; hold ...


0

As you suggest in your question the difference is in focus. KeyPressFcn is evaluated only when the figure has focus (but not its children). WindowKeyPressFcn, on the other hand, is evaluated whenever the figure or any of its children has focus. This can be illustrated with following code: function test_keypress_vs_windowkeypress h.hf = figure(); ...


0

If you are able to write your individual frames to images in headless mode*, VideoWriter will take image data directly, there's no need to use im2frame. However, you will have to loop over the written out images, read them in, add them to the movie, and so on, so slightly clunky. Assuming here that fnames contains all the frames in order (frame001.jpg and ...



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