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4

You could apply accumarray. Note that accumarray only works when X is a column. So, if X has two columns, you can call accumarray twice: centroids(:,1) = accumarray(idx, X(:,1), [], @mean) centroids(:,2) = accumarray(idx, X(:,2), [], @mean) Alternatively, if X contains two columns of real numbers, you can use complex to "pack" the two columns into one ...


4

The NumPy function np.std takes an optional parameter ddof: "Delta Degrees of Freedom". By default, this is 0. Set it to 1 to get the Matlab result: >>> np.std([1,3,4,6], ddof=1) 2.0816659994661326


3

You can avoid the bsxfun by using logical indexing, this seems to be a worthwhile performance increase, at least for small matrices X. It is best for small K, and for a small number of rows of X. K = 3; X = [1 2; 3 4; 5 6; 7 8]; idx = [1;2;3;1]; centroids=zeros(K,2); for i = 1:K ids = (idx == i); centroids(i,:) = sum(X(ids,:),1)./sum(ids); end If ...


2

You can use cellfun, A = cellfun( @(x) isequal(x,V), S ); or A = cellfun(@isequal,S,repmat({V},size(S))); will give, A = 0 0 0 0 0 and sum(A) > 0 will give final results.


2

Problem case #1: Assuming you want to find if for each cell in S, there is at least one element that is also present in V, you can use this arrayfun based approach - out = arrayfun(@(n) any(ismember(S{n},V)),1:numel(S)) For the given inputs, you would get - >> out out = 1 1 0 1 1 Or cellfun based approach (though I would bet ...


2

The standard deviation is the square root of the variance. The variance of a random variable X is defined as An estimator for the variance would therefore be where denotes the sample mean. For randomly selected , it can be shown that this estimator does not converge to the real variance, but to If you randomly select samples and estimate the sample ...


2

If your IDs are unique, positive integers, you could do the following: Approach #4 [ With sparse and indexing] Construct a sparse vector that corresponds to the mapping: ID -> rowIndex and evaluate this vector: indexOfID = sparse(A(:,1), 1, 1:size(A,1)); C = A(indexOfID(B),:); This could be beneficial, when you want to query your IDs more than ...


2

I don't think you can do that really but you could 'spoof' it using a sparse matrix perhaps (depending strongly on what your application is): b(1001:1005) = sparse(A) However for what you've mentioned in your comments it makes much more sense to do something like this: study = 1001:1005; results = 1:5; %// This is your A ind = A == 3; %// Now find the ...


1

A few things to note: 400 kB is not a large file. 4000 files in 4 minutes is 0.06 seconds each. You dont appear to use the variable c. Your matrix index starts at 40020 and each loop the next struct index containing data is +10 etc.... This is very sparse which is a waste of memory and a small amount of time. You state you use dlmread and import data -> ...


1

You need to go over each vector in the set and check if it's the same as the vector V: for i=1:length(S) if (isequal(S{i},V)) % V is in S end; end; Take notice that you address S with curly brackets {} to get the value of the cell and not the cell itself.


1

The exception ME is an MException object which contains an identifier, the message, a cause and the stack. The identifier is only there to allow MATLAB an unique identification of an error. The message contains a description of the error. The cause contains an array of MExceptions which have led to the current exception. This allows you to track the ...


1

The idea behind bsxfun is to evaluate a certain function for all possible combinations of two elements (b in bsxfun stands for binary), each coming from one of the arrays. (NB: This is valid if you use it with a row and a column vector. But bsxfun can also do more.) What you want to achieve is simply: For all entries of a single array, evaluate a function. ...


1

You are multiplying two 1xn vectors, that is not possible. This multiplication causes the error: y2= -5*((4-6*x0)*cos(-x0.^3+2*x0.^2+1)-(4*x0-3*x0.^2).^2*sin(-x0.^3+2*x0.^2+1)); ^ ^ | | Using element-wise multiplication .* might be the solution, but ...


1

It's an ugly hack, but you can disable Matlab's plotting before running the eye() function and re-enable it after the function. Something like the following might work: set(0,'DefaultFigureVisible','off'); eyediagram(...); saveas(gcf, 'myfig', 'fig'); # save it in a file myfig.fig set(0,'DefaultFigureVisible','on'); And when you want to show it ...


1

In Octave, you can decrease the size of the marker like this: x = 0:0.1:100; fx = rand(length(x), 1)'; plot(x, fx, ".", "markersize", 1)


1

You could use textscan here for reading first N entries, which is supposedly pretty fast in latest versions of MATLAB - fid = fopen(inputfile); %// inputfile is the path to the input text file C = textscan(fid, '%d %d %d64',N); %// N is the number of first entries to be read fclose(fid); %// Get data into three separate variables (if needed) ...


1

In matlab2014a 64bit windows, you only change [vbar,s,convergence] = eigs_new(@mex_w_times_x_symmetric,size(P,1),nbEigenValues,'LA',options,tril(P)); in line 81 of ncut.m into [vbar,s,convergence] = eigs(@mex_w_times_x_symmetric,size(P,1),nbEigenValues,'LA',options,tril(P)); and then eigs_new.m is useless which don't care. Becaus in 2014 (or more than ...



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