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6

Problems like this can often be solved using either diff or cumsum. They are essentially discrete derivative and integration functions. For your problem I believe that Final = cumsum([Starts 0]-[0 Ends]); Final = Final(1:end-1); achieves the desired result.


4

There's a few answers here already, I'll throw my try into the pot. Conversion to string can be expensive, so if it can be avoided, it should be. n = 1:100000; % sample numbers m = 3; % digit to check x = 1; % number to find % Length of the numbers in digits num_length = floor(log10(abs(n)))+1; % digit (from the left) to check num_place = num_length-m; ...


3

By casting to strings, the trick to vectorising is just to make sure x is a column vector. x(:) guarantees this. Also you need to left-align the strings which is done with the format specifier '%-d' where - is for left-alignment and d is for integers: s = num2str(x(:), '%-d'); ind = s(:,3)=='1' and this also allows you to easily solve your first case: ...


2

This looks like you are trying to build a scale-space and displaying the results to the user. This isn't a problem to do. Bear in mind that you will have to do this with for loops, as I don't see how you will be able to do this unless you copy and paste several lines of code. Actually, I'm going to use a while loop, and I'll tell you why soon. In any ...


2

Should you have access to Matlabs Mapping Toolbox, your problem can be solved easily using the function polyxpoly(). It will find the intersections of two graphs. They do not even have to be lines, also polygons work. Here is an example for your case: %graphics_toolkit gnuplot %use this for now it's older but allows zoom freq=[20,30,40,50,60,70,80]; ...


2

I'm assuming you're using the string \n to declare a new line in your output. For Notepad++ this is sufficient, because it interprets a new line just with \n. For the Windows Editor you need to include the carriage return also: substitute: \n with \r\n This way not just a new line is created, it also tells the editor to actually continue on the next line. ...


2

That's quite a mouthful to explain!... nevertheless, I'd love to explain it to you. However, I'm a bit surprised that you couldn't understand the documentation from MathWorks. It's actually quite good at explaining a lot (if not all...) of their functions. BTW, bwlabel and regionprops are not defined for grayscale images. You can only apply these to ...


2

chi2pval is a private function that's part of the Stats toolbox. This function does exist in MATLAB, but you aren't able to call it directly as it's located in a private folder that isn't accessible by you... at least not normally. What you can do is search for where the source file is located. You can do that typing in the following command into your ...


1

The values returned by vpa aren't actual numbers - they're symbolic objects that still contain the original value of the number (before rounding). To compare the two, you should convert them back to double: Y = double(vpa(0.000036856864)) Z = double(vpa(0.000036857009)) eq(Y,Z) which should return 1


1

1) Method #1 You are being very inefficient in the way you build the intermediate variables (arrays changing size and such). Consider this improved implementation: % given some data (longitude/latitude) locs = rand(N,2); % N = 10^5 in your case % pick an appropriate size (guesstimate the number of nonzeros in the sparse mat) nzmx = ...; % compute ...


1

The issue is with eqtn21 and eqtn31. They are of size 1 while x is a vector of a different size. When you plot you need to match their sizes with the size of x if you want to have a constant line (so for all values of x you'll get 1), or eqtn21 = [1 1 1 1 ... 1]; An easy way to do it is to write eqtn21 = 1+0*x; etc. Other ways to do this can be do refine ...


1

Using conv is an excellent way to implement a moving average. In the code you are using, wts is how much you are weighing each value (as you guessed). the sum of that vector should always be equal to one. If you wish to weight each value evenly and do a size N moving filter then you would want to do N = 7; wts = ones(N,1)/N; sum(wts) % result = 1 Using ...


1

Even though you haven't showed us any attempts to solving your code, this is a nice exercise that I wouldn't mind tackling. What you can do first is generate a square grid of co-ordinates centered at the origin that span between -r and +r. Bear in mind that the spacing between each point in your 2D grid is 1, if I'm interpreting your question right. Once ...


1

It looks like you want to perform 2 sample (paired) t-test, in which case you want to use the ttest2 function. It's quite easy to compute: Without much information about your data I re-arranged them into single row vectors for comparisons. The code I use is straightforward: clear clc % Define experimental data. Cond1 = [-8 2 -1 3 -1 -1 -1 -2 ...


1

The -largeArrayDims option is a switch to the mex command in MATLAB that simply indicates not to define MX_COMPAT_32. So, in Visual Studio, you don't have to do anything since this is not defined by default. If you want the opposite behavior (-compatibleArrayDims), then define MX_COMPAT_32 in the Preprocessor section. From tmwtypes.h: tmwtypes.h #ifdef ...


1

You can do the conversion manually: uint32(floor(toc*1000)); %// or "round" instead of "floor" Example >> tic, randn(1000); t = uint32(floor(toc*1000)) t = 49 >> whos t Name Size Bytes Class Attributes t 1x1 4 uint32


1

Assuming you don't have access to the built-in function findpeaks in the signal processing toolbox... You can find peaks using the diff function like so: peaks = [false; diff(diff(y) > 0) < 0; false] e.g.: x = 1:100; y = sin(0.2*x)+sin(rand()*x)*0.2; peaks = [false, diff(diff(y) > 0) < 0, false]; plot(x,y); hold on; plot(x(peaks),y(peaks), ...


1

You can compute the indices of the peaks easily as follows: ind = 1+find((input_args(2:end-1)>input_args(1:end-2)) & ... (input_args(2:end-1)>input_args(3:end))); Example_ >> input_args = [1 2 5 4 7]; gives ind = 3 meaning that only the third value is a peak.


1

Firstly, if you use matrices of class logical, then you don't need to test for equality to 1. Indexing aside, the best approach would be: bFlag = any(A(:) & B(:)); If you need indexing, you have two options. You can use a small vectorising anonymous function: fhVec = @(T)(T(:)); bFlag = any(fhVec(A(rowIndices, colIndices) & B(rowIndices, ...


1

Try this function from the File Exchange, it seems to work just fine in Octave. x0 are the frequencies of interest: >> [x0,y0,iout,jout] = intersections(freq,amp_orig,freq,amp_inv) x0 = 30.000 30.000 42.500 55.000 64.286 80.000 y0 = 4.0000 4.0000 4.0000 4.0000 4.0000 4.0000 iout = 2.0000 2.0000 3.2500 ...


1

pricesfile = fopen('Prices.txt'); data = textscan(pricesfile, '%s %d d'); fclose(pricesfile); You were on the right track but after this (through a bit of hackery) you don't actually need a loop: plot(repmat(data{2},1,2)', repmat(data{3},1,2)', '.') legend(data{1}) What you DO NOT want to do is create variables named after strings. Rather store them in ...


1

If you open the HTML code of the URL in your question, you'll see that figure is generated by the following part: <iframe src='/charts/statsplus/1821403/' style='width: 550px; height: 300px; overflow-y: hidden;' frameborder='no' allowtransparency="true" scrolling="no"> </iframe> So all you have to do is save that file, using its full URL: ...


1

depthMap is not an indexed image, but every pixel codes the distance from the focal plane in mm, as you correctly believe. To show such an image using imshow, I suggest to use auto-scaling by default, i.e. imshow(depthMap,[]), or use a fixed scale (as you're currently doing) if there is a useful meaning to the minimum and maximum. Turn on the colorbar to ...


1

Code %// Input array array1 = [-94341 1234 4321 6515 847251737 6218473 541846 3115473 175846] N = numel(array1); %// number of elements in input array digits_sep = num2str(array1(:))-'0'; %//' Seperate the digits into a matrix %// Simple case output1 = array1(any(digits_sep==1,2)) %// More complex case output col_num = 3; %// Get column numbers for ...


1

One way of getting there is to cast your numbers as strings and then check if the 3rd position of that string is '1'. It works perfectly fine in a loop, but I am confident that there is also a vectorized solution: numbers = [6218473, 541846, 3115473, 175846]' returned_numbers = []; for i = 1:length(numbers) number = numbers(i); y = sprintf('%d', ...


1

This kind of question assumes you know how to index into a matrix. Let's tackle each part of this question one part at a time, shall we? Copy matrix A into a matrix g: Well this is pretty straight forward. You would just need to do this: g = A; Here, you are copying the matrix A into a variable called g Allocate a 2 x 2 matrix h using the zeros ...


1

The problem is you test fora root to exist. You have z1 = coolfun(a, L); z2 = coolfun(b, L); if z1 * z2 > 0 disp('Root may not exist') however since the function you are trying to solve is not monotonic, you can have both end-points positive, but intermediate points negative (or vice-versa). In this case multiple zeroes exist but your test says ...



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