Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

This will do: sortrows(A,columnNumber);


3

You can do this: [~,order] = sort(A(:,4)); A = A(order,:);


3

Assuming A to be the input array, you have two approaches to play with here. Approach #1 A combination of accumarray and unique - [unqcol2,~,idx] = unique(A(:,2),'stable') [accumarray(idx,A(:,1)) unqcol2] Approach #2 With bsxfun - [unqcol2,~,idx] = unique(A(:,2),'stable') [sum(bsxfun(@times,bsxfun(@eq,idx,1:max(idx)),A(:,1)),1).' unqcol2 ]


3

The matlab function inpolygon does exactly what you want. In addition the function tells you which points are on the frontier of the polygon. Please refer to the matlab documentation.


3

There is a function called inpolygon that does exactly that.


2

Well, probably the simplest option would be to define two different functions. In Matlab, function overloading shadows all functions but one (i.e. only one function with a given name can be used at a time), which is not very interesting in practice. However, if you absolutely want only one function with two different behaviors, then it can be achieved by ...


2

Sounds like you want 3d arrays: groups = permute(reshape(data, [10 100 500]), [1 3 2]); Now groups(:, :, 1) is a 10x500 matrix, group 1.


1

This should work for you - threshold = 50; %// Find unique columns for first three rows of M [unqM,~,IDs] = unique(M(1:3,:).','rows') %//' %// Find the fourth row elements from M that satisfy the threshold matches = M(end,:)>threshold %// Get the counts of the unique columns satisfying threshold criteria out1 = ...


1

I have the same problem as you (R2013a on OSX) with the example by the Mathworks. For some reason it seems we can't use findpeaks with the x-and y-data as input arguments, We need to call the function with the y data and use the [peaks,locations] output to get the peaks/plot them. It looks like in R2014b they changed some stuff about findpeaks that does ...


1

Here is another solution: a = cumsum(A); seriesOnesB = diff( [ 0 a( diff([A 0]) == -1 ) ] ); also possible in one line, but slower than the two lines above! seriesOnes = diff( [0 getfield( cumsum(A),{diff([A 0]) == -1} )] ); seriesOnes = 4 2 5 Elaborated explanation: %// cumulative sum a = cumsum(A); %// find end of series of ones: ...


1

You can try this: A = logical([0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1]); B = [~A(1) A ~A(end)]; %// Add edges at start/end edges_indexes = find(diff(B)); %// find edges lengths = diff(edges_indexes); %// length between edges %// Separate zeros and ones, to a cell array s(1+A(1)) = {lengths(1:2:end)}; s(1+~A(1)) = ...


1

You could use an existing code for run-length-encoding, which does the (ugly) work for you and then filter out your vectors yourself. This way your helper function is rather general and its functionality is evident from the name runLengthEncode. Reusing code from this answer: function [lengths, values] = runLengthEncode(data) startPos = ...


1

The error message you have is perfectly normal. You have defined a function which requires one input: function B = generate_matrix(n) B = zeros(n,n); When you press the Run button (or F5), Matlab attempts to execute the code. Or Matlab does not know what is n, hence the error message. Actually, the Run button only works for scripts or functions with no ...


1

There is a magical function called bsxfun that does almost everything in MATLAB and certainly finds another perfect setup here. The implementation with it would look something like this - y = bsxfun(@and,x1(:)==0,x2(:).'==0) Sample run with x1 as 1x4 and x2 as 1x6 - x1 = 0 -1 -1 0 x2 = -1 -1 -1 -1 0 0 y = 0 0 ...


1

First, matrix = zeros(w, h); creates confusion: you are probably thinking of w as width and h as height. But the first argument of zeros is height: for example, zeros(2,3) is 0 0 0 0 0 0 Generally: row index first, column index second. Then you have for i = 1:test but test is a matrix. You need a number here. Here is a working ...


1

The first piece of code is what you need to get it working. However, your for loop is incorrect. You probably want to iterative over all of the columns, so do for i = 1 : size(test,2), not test. size(test,2) determines how many columns your matrix has. Therefore: test = zeros(w, 3); for i = 1:size(test,2) %// Change here point = ...


1

You code A(S,S)*A(S,C) + A(S,R)*A(R,C) + A(S,C)*A(C,C) (i.e. sum over all possible intermediate states, or Chapman-Kolmogorov equation) is just matrix multiplication: A(S,:)*A(:,C) In general, A2 = A^2 gives the probabilty of all such double transitions, and An = A^n is the probability of n-order transitions (see for example here). So A2(S,C) is the ...


1

This is more a LaTeX problem than a MATLAB problem. If you print $\AA$ in a LaTeX document, it will look the same. A workaround would be to remove the $...$, as you don't need a math environment for \AA: str={'q=0.1\AA'}; annotation('textbox',... [0.45 0.8 0.2 0.1],... 'interpreter','latex','string',str,... 'fontsize',20,... 'fontname','times new ...


1

If you have the image processing toolbox installed you can use: medianBlocks = blockproc(A,[3,3],@(X) ones(size(X.data))*median(X.data(:))) A == medianBlocks



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible