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5

How about using bsxfun and permute Assuming M and N are same and equal to A out = bsxfun(@rdivide, permute(A,[1 3 2]), A) Input: A = 1 14 7 80 2 15 8 12 3 16 9 11 Results for your Sample Input: out(:,:,1) = 1.0000 0.0714 0.1429 0.0125 1.0000 0.1333 0.2500 0.1667 1.0000 0.1875 0.3333 0.2727 ...


4

A = 1 2 3 4 2 4 6 7 3 1 9 8 [n,m]=size(A); v=zeros(n+m-1,1); i = 1; for d = -(n-1):(m-1) v(i) = mean(diag(flipud(A),d)); i = i+1; end


4

An alternative to using cell fun as pointed out by @Luis Mendo is to use structfun - that way you keep your variable names for each array. You need to have al your variable in a structure for this to work: myStruct.Date = Data; myStruct.Meter = Meter; myStruct.Model = Model; subStruct = structfun ( @(x) x(idx), myStruct, 'UniformOutput', false )


4

The proper call to receive all three arguments would be: [A, B, C] = something (X), where Tot would be placed into A, Z into B, and Y into C. If you just want Y, you can use the "tilde" operator to ignore other outputs: [~,~,C] = something(X).


3

If A = [1 14 7 80 2 15 8 12 3 16 9 11] Then bsxfun(@ldivide, prod(A,2), A).*A returning ans = 0.0001 0.0250 0.0062 0.8163 0.0014 0.0781 0.0222 0.0500 0.0019 0.0539 0.0170 0.0255 So the idea is to just divide every element by ALL the other elements in that row (i.e. by the product of the row, ...


3

You could to it this way: t = cellfun(@(x) x(idx), {Date, Meter, Model}, 'uniformoutput', 0); [Date, Meter, Model] = deal(t{:}); In recent versions of Matlab you can omit deal, and thus the second line becomes: [Date, Meter, Model] = t{:}; It would be easier if instead of separate variables you had a cell array, such that each cell contained one of ...


2

bsxfun is of course one of the good tools to vectorize things, but if you can somehow introduce matrix-multiplication that would be best way to go about it, as matrix multiplications are really fast on MATLAB. It seems here you can use matrix-multiplication to get exp_xBeta like so - [m1,n1,r1] = size(x); n2 = size(beta,2); exp_xBeta_matmult = ...


2

The difference between Matlab and FFTW comes with the scaling factor applied to the transform. Whereas Matlab's FFT is normalized, the algorithm used by FFTW as described in FFTW's documentation, is not normalized. In other words, the full-circle transform using FFTW (forward followed by backward) scales the result by a factor N. Correspondingly, comparing ...


2

The problem is that you're using the default constructor for the containers.Map class. From the help: myMap = containers.Map() creates an empty object myMap that is an instance of the MATLAB containers.Map class. The properties of myMap are Count (set to 0), KeyType (set to 'char'), and ValueType (set to 'any'). In other words, you ...


2

It can be done without loops (not the most readable code, I admit): B = zeros(size(A,1)+size(A,2)-1, size(A,2)); B(bsxfun(@plus, (1:size(A,1)).', (0:size(A,2)-1)*(size(A,1)+size(A,1)+1))) = A; v = sum(B.')./[1:size(A,1) size(A,1):-1:1];


2

Take a look at this: http://www.mathworks.com/help/comm/ref/comm.rectangularqamdemodulator-class.html hMod = comm.RectangularQAMModulator('ModulationOrder',16); dataIn = randi([0 15],10000,1); txSig = step(hMod,dataIn); You can also use: TxS = (randi(4,N,1)*2-5)+i*(randi(4,N,1)*2-5)


2

The Problem There are many reasons why the implementation of a random forest in two different programming languages (e.g., MATLAB and Python) will yield different results. First of all, note that results of two random forests trained on the same data will never be identical by design: random forests often choose features at each split randomly and use ...


2

The sprintf command you have provided behaves as sprintf('%+d%+di\n', [1, 3], [2, 4]) since real(C(1:2)) returns [1, 3] and imag(C(1:2)) returns [2, 4] which behaves as you've observed. What you want to do is: sprintf('%+d%+di\n', [1, 3; 2, 4]) It should be accomplished by either looping over elements of C or with the following sprinf('%+d%+di\n', ...


2

MATLAB Solution With ismember - C = A; [is_present,pos] = ismember(A(:,1),B(:,1)) C(is_present,2) = B(pos(is_present),2) Or use bsxfun to replace ismember - [is_present,pos] = max(bsxfun(@eq,A(:,1),B(:,1).'),[],2); Sample run - >> A,B A = 1 21 3 4 4 12 5 65 B = 3 56 5 121 4 66 >> C = ...


1

One approach with diff - b = a([true diff(a)~=0]) c = diff(find([1 diff(a)~=0 1]))


1

Assuming that the y-axis points upward, it seems like you are only checking the projection of your vector on the xy-plane. If you are trying to filter all vertical vectors, then you should do the exact same check on the yz-plane as well. % xy-projection x_filter = abs(atan2(P0(:,2)-P1(:,2),P0(:,1)-P1(:,1))<threshold; % yz-projection z_filter = ...


1

You can search for the commas contained in each line and the either use the indexes of their location in the string or their amount to loop till the end of the line.


1

If you can use Matlab functions: function [output] = mysum(a,b,inputfun) output = sum(inputfun(a:b))


1

Here is an example in the same kind, set cbtics ("-2.5" -2.5, "-1.5" -1.5, "0" 0, "1.5" 1.5, "2.5" 2.5) set palette defined (-2.5 "color1", -1.5 "color1", -1.5 "color2", 0 "color2", 0 "color3", ...) plot your data Note:- each color will repeat twice one for starting and another for ending.


1

If you don't care about the intermediate results or the content of your global workspace, you could always kill MATLAB's process. Next time you'll run a script with huge loops, take the advice of including some function calls that will transfer briefly the control to the user interface: drawnow, getframe etc.


1

Ctrl + C? Some heavy Matlab calls may be un-interuptable in this way, but mostly this should work.


1

Inputs: M = [1007 1007 4044 1007 4044 1007 5002 5002 5002 622 622; 552 552 300 552 300 552 431 431 431 124 124; 2010 2010 1113 2010 1113 2010 1100 1100 1100 88 88; 7 12 25 15 12 30 2 10 55 32 12]; X = {[2 5 68 44],[2 10 55 9 17],[1 55 6 7 8 9],[32 12]}; Doing this (what you have ...


1

You can define that function as an anonymous function like this: f=@(idx, varargin) subsref(cellfun(@(x) x(idx), varargin, 'uni', 0), substruct('{}', {':'})); Now >> A=rand(1,3) A = 0.9649 0.1576 0.9706 >> B={'a' 'b' 'c'} B = 'a' 'b' 'c' >> [x,y]=f(2,A,B) x = 0.1576 y = 'b'


1

Do you mean that X and Y labels? xlabel ( 'Apple', 'Color', 'red' )


1

For OpenCV the formula is right there in the document you point to. For Matlab, have a look here http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/newsreader/view_thread/269237: Just dive into the code - they gave it to you. Just put the cursor on the function rgb2hsv() in your code and type control-d.


1

Best way: google more about Matlab's cell array Another way: you can create a 3D (n-by-m-by-3) matrix, i.e: m = zeros(n,m,3)


1

You may also need to specify the CUDA runtime library, and ensure you have all the standard Windows library dependencies linked by checking the "Inherit from parent or project defaults" box: It compiled and linked find for me this way. However, I set up my Visual Studio project using a property sheet (MATLAB.props) as described here. EDIT: I've added ...


1

You need to export with format='table', see docs here. This is can be read by various R packages and should be ok in matlab, as this is plain vanilla HDF5, which some meta-data attached (which is probably not read automatically).



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