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10

It is not necessary, a language without a unary plus does not allow to write +1. Obviously you could also write 1 but when importing data which always writes the + or - it's very nice to have. Searching some source codes, I found a curious use of + A=+A which replaced the code: if ~isnumeric(A) A=double(A); end It casts chars and logicals to ...


7

In the function datestr(), the 2nd parameter denotes how the output should look like. It doesn't say anything about the input. Essentially, you try to perform 2 steps: parse a string and then format the parsed date again. So you can do n = datenum('19-01-2004','dd-mm-yyyy') datestr(n, 'yyyy-mm-dd') and you'll get an n of 731965 and a final output of ...


6

It can be useful when defining new numeric types. Suppose you define quaternion and overload uplus: classdef quaternion ... end Then in your code you can write: x = quaternion(...); y = [+x, -x]; z = +quaternion.Inf; t = -quaternion.Inf; If you don't you cannot have same syntax as for other numeric. PS: To the question "is it useful" (in the ...


6

bsxfun(@gt,A,B).*A should do it. My result is: 10 10 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 6 10 0 0 8 0 7 0 0 8 12 8 Explanation: The MATLAB function bsxfun lets you perform element-wise operations on arrays (because of this it is one of the language's most useful functions). The first argument is the operation you ...


4

When using datestr to convert a date string from one form to another, the format of the input date string is limit to those listed here. The format of your input '19-01-2004' is 'dd-mm-yyyy' and is not one of the supported formats. If we change the input string to '01/19/2004', which is the supported format 'mm/dd/yyyy', we get the correct output: ...


4

I'm not sure if this fully constitutes "useful" or if it's the best programming practice, but in some cases, one may wish to use the unary + for symmetry/clarity reasons. There's probably a better example, but I'm thinking of something like this: A = [+1 -1 +1; -1 +1 -1; +1 -1 +1]; As for the uplus function, it's kind of a NOOP for numeric ...


3

What you see in "Example 4" is accused as bad programming style. The documentation also contains a section why to avoid eval. I would recommend a struct with dynamic field names to achieve similar. filename='name1'; mydata=struct(); mydata.(genvarname(filename))=load(filename); Besides better performance, you also get additional functionality when ...


3

This should do it: %// Value to check a = 977; %// indices of cells containing a at the first place idx = cellfun(@(x) find(x == a,1) == 1, my_cells) %// first cell containing a cellsWith977atFirst = my_cells(idx) For my_cells = { [977 1 2] [2 977 977] [977 2 1] } it will return celldisp(cellsWith977atFirst) cellsWith977atFirst{1} = 977 1 ...


3

Let me show you how you could do it. I did it just for fun! You can change the size of your input matrix as you wish. A=[0.3 0.2 ; 0.1 0.7]; sA=size(A); Aplot=rot90(A,3); figure;hold on rectangle('Position',[0,0,sA(2),sA(1)],'Facecolor',[1 1 1],'edgecolor','none') for ii=0:sA(1) plot([0 sA(2)], [ii ii],'k','Linewidth',3) end for ii=0:sA(2) ...


3

There are a couple of errors in your code. Notably you are using operations reserved to compare numbers with strings, which is not possible. Moreover, the variable Gender should be a string but is manipulated as a number, which is confusing. Be sure to look into the function strcmp that is used to compare strings together. You can then use if/elseif blocks. ...


2

When performing the integration, MATLAB (or most any other integration software) computes a low-order solution qLow and a high-order solution qHigh. There are a number of different methods of computing the true error (i.e., how far either qLow or qHigh is from the actual solution qTrue), but MATLAB simply computes an absolute error as the difference between ...


2

My strategy would be to convert your string into cells. Here is a solution: % --- Define M M = [sprintf('%s\t%s\n', 'a', 'b') ... sprintf('%s\t%s\n', '011', '10') ... sprintf('%s\t%s\n', '001', '10') ... sprintf('%s\t%s\n', '112', '4') ... sprintf('%s\t%s\n', '015', '2') ... sprintf('%s\t%s\n', '086', '1') ... sprintf('%s\t%s\n', ...


2

You can do it by assigning a handle to your bar plot, and then change the FaceColor property afterward. The handles will actually be an array of handles, each containing the properties of every individual patch object making up the bar plot. That's then easy to change any property you want: clear clc close all xdata = [1 2 3]; ydata = [10 20 30; 40 50 60; ...


2

There is no "matrix" class in python. From your code it looks you're talking about numpy. A possible gotcha for matlab users is that in numpy array operations are elementwise by default, and if you want matrix operations, you need to request them: np.dot for matrix multiplications, np.linalg.inv for inversion etc. np.linalg.inv(np.sqrt(a)) first takes ...


2

You need to use permute there to "send" the elements of ABB to the third dimension creating singleton dimensions in dim-1 and dim-2. Thus, the final result after applying bsxfun (for singleton expansion) would be an expanded 3D array covering the comparisons for each element of the 2D array ABV against each element of 1D array ABB. So, do something like this ...


2

Yes there is. The solution is called global variables and is in almost every case not recommended. I strongly recommend that you keep passing the vector to foo by arguments. Global variables are not evil, but they can cause a serious amount of troubles. Matlab have actually tried to make globals easier to use, but it is not possible to solve all the problems ...


2

This is absolutely bad practice ... but you can define x as global in main.m and then use it in foo.m main.m function [] = main() %[ global x; x = [72 5 8 42]; y = foo(4); disp(y); %] end foo.m function [y] = foo(i) %[ global x; y = x(i); %] end Again, this is bad practice and I strongly encourage you to avoid doing this and ...


2

I now understand what you want. The link that you posted from Wikipedia is very useful. You are trying to build what is known as an Esri grid. Here is a pictorial representation found on Wikipedia: What you are given is a N x 3 matrix where the first column denotes the row IDs of this matrix, the second row denotes the column IDs of this matrix, and ...


2

A solution is to work from a linear index and transform it to some coordinate in the alphabet using ind2sub. Code being more clear than long explanation here is my brute force solution: function [testpass] = BruteForcePassword(realpass) %[ if (nargin < 1), realpass = 'hello'; end maxPassLength = 8; alphabet = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'; ...


2

You can use matlab's table data structure as in T = table( rand(4,3) ); and modify the metadata properties with T.Properties.VariableNames = {'c1' 'c2' 'c3'}; % columns T.Properties.RowNames = {'A' 'B' 'C' 'D'}; % rows Column names can't be pure numbers though, because you need to access them as in T.c1 % get the column c1 T{'A',:} % get ...


1

The Taylor series you use needs x to be expressed in radians. After the input multiply x by π/180 to convert degrees to radians. Also you need to have many iterations, not just x. Try for i=1:1:10 because factorial grows very fast.


1

Assuming A and B to be the first and second arrays respectively, this would be one approach - %// Split the first column of B with "-" as the delimiter Bcol1_split = cellfun(@(x) strsplit(x,'-'),B(:,1),'Uni',0) %// Extract the first split string which would be the state codes Bcol1_first_string = cellfun(@(x) x{1},Bcol1_split,'Uni',0) %// Detect IDs of ...


1

Since you talk about strings, I assume you have a cell array: A = {'001' '0' '111' '5' '234' '6' '000' '0' '101' '5'}; Then the desired output can be obtained with A(strcmp(A(:,2),'0'),:) = [];


1

I think this is largely to do with making copies of the data variable. If you arrange things so that MATLAB's copy-on-write behaviour works in your favour, you can get pretty decent times. I wrote a simple version using linear indexing function data = dealiasing2d2(where_dealiased, data) [n1, n2, nk] = size(data); where_li = find(where_dealiased); for idx = ...


1

This should work: sizeA = size(A,1); % check how long array A is index = 1; for ii=1:sizeA if ~(A(index,1) == B(1,1)) || ~(A(index,2) == B(1,2)) % if either entry doesn't match A(index,:) = []; % clear the line else index=index+1; % else: move to ...


1

It looks like using Python you calculated the inverse of the square root of the matrix (sounds weird sorry) instead of raising the matrix to the power -0.5. For instance, running this command with Matlab I get your output with python: m = [34.502193 27.039107 24.735074 27.039107 36.535737 26.069613 24.735074 26.069613 32.798584] A = inv(sqrt(m)) A ...


1

I also get that error running your code (R2013a). Since C1 and C1 are cell arrays of size 8x1 you actually need to transpose both of them to avoid the error (and thus get cell arrays of size 1x8 as requested by strjoin). That's a bit stupid that it does not do the transpose by itself. Add these 2 lines before the loop providing the error and it runs fine: ...


1

You can always use open() function to open a specified file in python but you will need to modulate the path a little bit, you have 2 options either use \\ in place of \ to skip the escape characters or you can simply use raw text format as r'C:\Users\user1\Documents\python\data.txt' open_file = open("C:\\Users\\user1\\Documents\\python\\data.txt") contents ...


1

MATLAB have decided that this is ugly. I do not think that you can do so much about it. Also, each column would indeed get fairly wide. Try `fprintf('%f ',t(1:10:161), B(1:10:161), G(1:10:161) ); fprintf('\n')`. However, to get the printouts, try to use column vectors T = table(t(1:10:161).', B(1:10:161).', G(1:10:161).') Where .' is used instead of ...


1

I am not sure about your question. Are you trying to implement imhistmatch? Then probably your function is in the wrong folder or you have a typo in the functions name. use addpath('Pathto/imhistmatch') to ensure that matlab can find your implemented function. But maybe you want to use the function imhistmatch provided by the image processing toolbox. ...



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