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5

Under linux, system and unix do the same: they evaluate their string argument in the shell. For this you have to escape the single quotes due to MATLAB's string syntax, you do this by doubling each single quote: [~,output]=system('du --max-depth 1 | awk -v q=''"'' ''$1 < 30000000 && $2 != "." {sub(/^[0-9\t ]+/, "", $0); print q $0 q}'''); This ...


3

X = input('Enter X please: '); Y = input('Enter Y please: '); Z = input('Enter Z please: '); Cells={} Cells{1}=zeros(X,Y); for i=2:Y-1 Cells{i}=zeros(Y,Y); end; Cells{Y-1}=zeros(Y,Z);


3

You are trying to use fprintf on a sym variable, which isn't allowed. fprintf is for numbers (single values, matrices, vectors), or character arrays / strings. Try converting your sym type variable to double, then display it. Also, change the specifier to %f, not %d, as I highly suspect your answer will be floating-point. In addition, you haven't ...


2

You could do this without using cells, but I strongly advice you not to, so: One way to do this, with each matrix being part of a cell: dims = str2num(input('Type in selected x,y,z: ', 's')); M = arrayfun(@(n) zeros(dims(n), dims(2)), [1 2*ones(1,y-1) 3], 'UniformOutput', 0) %% In the command window: Type in selected x,y,z: 3 4 2 M = [3x4 double] ...


2

I'm not sure how the linked question got the correct answer because you're actually solving a fourth-order equation using their methodology. The right hand-side vector given to the ODE suite should only have n entries for an n-order problem. In your case, the change of variables results in the third order system with the initial conditions . ...


1

Using the rewriting of the Kronecker product given by Daniels answer e=zeros(size(B,1),size(A,1)); for i=1:size(A,2) e = e + B(:,i)*A(:,i).'; end e=reshape(e,[],1); we say that C = A' and thus for i=1:m e = e + B(:,i)*C(i,:); end which is the definition of the matrix product B*C. In conclusion the problem can thus be solved by the simple ...


1

This will be a bit more complex than Phil Goddard's solution. The advantage is that it will allow you to generate standalone code, if necessary, whereas extrinsic functions are not compatible with standalone code generation. The functions ode23 and ode45 are supported for code generation as of MATLAB R2014b so this applies if your MATLAB release is at least ...


1

What you're locking for is anonymous functions objf = @(mb,nb)sum(V(mb)^2+V(nb)^2-2*V(mb)*V(nb)*cos(delta(mb)-delta(nb))) objf = @(mb,nb)sum(V(mb)^2+V(nb)^2-2*V(mb)*V(nb)*cos(delta(mb)-delta(nb))) objf(1,2) There you go (as far as all other variables and functions of this anonymous function are defined).


1

Just to complete Andras Deak's answer the bang operator would also work: !du --max-depth 1 | awk -v q='"' '$1 < 30000000 && $2 != "." {sub(/^[0-9\t ]+/, "", $0); print q $0 q}' Best,


1

What histfit does is plotting a pdf normalized to the scale of the histogram. A scaling factor of numel(p).*mean(diff(x)) is applied to match the curve with the histogram. It scales the area under the pdf to the area the histogram covers.


1

This is another Idea how to solve the problem. I am not absolutely sure if it always produces the correct result. It is based on a assumption: An optimal solution can created sorting both x and y, then circular shifting y. If this is true, this solution is much better, but I am not sure if this is true. x=x(:); y=y(:); %Sort both vector to reduce the ...


1

This is basically RobertSettlers solution, but using the distance metric which is now clear from the discussion, a simple brute force approac: x=x(:); y=y(:); Y=perms(y); [distance,I]=min(sum(bsxfun(absDiffDeg,x,Y.'),1)); best_permuted_y=Y(I,:);



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