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8

Approaches One approach with arrayfun and ismember - Result = A(arrayfun(@(n) any(ismember(B,A{n})),1:numel(A))) Or with arrayfun and bsxfun - Result = A(arrayfun(@(n) any(any(bsxfun(@eq,B(:),A{n}),2)),1:numel(A))) Or with arrayfun and setdiff - Result = A(arrayfun(@(n) numel(setdiff(B,A{n})) < numel(B),1:numel(A))) Or with arrayfun and ...


6

Method #1 - Using (-1)^x Just use a linear increment operator to go from 0 to 200000 and multiply the sequence by (-1)^(x+1) to allow the sign of the sequence to alternate: x = 0:200000; y = ((-1).^(x+1)) .* x; The addition of the +1 is important so that the even positions get a positive sign while the odd positions get a negative sign. Method #2 - ...


5

Do not do this. If you find yourself having lots of variables x1, x2, x3 etc, in MATLAB, you have made a wrong turn. Even more so if you have to try and create them automatically. You will only make your life more difficult when you attempt to do anything with the variables you've just created. The better way is to take NV as a number (how precisely ...


4

To answer "How to achieve the result similar ceil function in JAVA?", you can use idivide with an integer cast on one of the arguments: H = 7; Hp = idivide(H,int8(2)); This will perform the division and round the fractional part toward 0 by default. The ceil function is unnecessary since integer division generates integers. You can wrap this in a ceil ...


4

You could convert to a datenum: tdiff = datenum(sample.tend) - datenum(sample.tstart) remebering that as the docs say: A serial date number represents the whole and fractional number of days from a fixed, preset date (January 0, 0000). so tdiff will be in units of days which is then simple to covert to hours or seconds or whatever you're after. ...


3

You can use ylabel to assign a label to the colorbar. Moreover, in order to print superscripts use ^{Text here}. If you want subscripts, use _{Text here}. Simple example: clear clc close all contourf(peaks) hC = colorbar('eastoutside'); LabelText = 'Label with ^{superscript}'; %// Use superscript ylabel(hC,LabelText,'FontSize',16) Resulting in this: ...


3

Matlab stores hexadecimal number as character arrays (or strings). So a = dec2hex(150) returns: a = '96' concatenating hexadecimal strings as you do: P=[dec2hex(150),dec2hex(151),dec2hex(152)] returns: P = '969798' Therefore, P(1) = '9' You probably want to use cell arrays to separately store hex-numbers: P = ...


3

Search for median in google or matlab (doc median) and you will find the median function. If you want to find the median of row 2, just use row:column indexing syntax: A = [1 2 4; 2 3 4; 6 2 8]; median(A(2,:))


2

You can use arrayfun with dec2hex to work on them elementwise and produce a cell array as the output that uses the format 0x... - P=[150,151,152] %// Input array out = arrayfun(@(n) strcat('0x',dec2hex(P(n))),1:numel(P),'Uni',0) Code run - out = '0x96' '0x97' '0x98'


2

There will not be a colour map in the file if it's a rgb image - only if it's an indexed image. imshow uses a default colour map (jet). If you want a greyscale map, you have to deliberately set colormap gray. im = rgb2gray(imread('filename')); imshow(im) colormap gray


2

See manual for dec2hex dec2hex - Convert decimal to hexadecimal number in string You are getting a string and thus P(1) only gives you the first character of the string. Try something like: >> P=[dec2hex(150);dec2hex(151);dec2hex(152)]; % note the ; instead of , >> P P = 96 97 98 >> P(1,:) ans = 96 However, P is still an array ...


2

Simply rescale the image so that you divide every single element by the maximum possible intensity that corresponds to a 12-bit (or 2^12 - 1 = 4095) unsigned integer and then multiply by the maximum possible intensity that corresponds to an 8-bit unsigned integer (or 2^8 - 1 = 255). Therefore: out = uint8((255.0/4095.0)*(double(in))); You need to cast to ...


2

From the documentation at http://www.mathworks.com/help/coder/ug/functions-supported-for-code-generation--categorical-list.html#bq1h2z8-25 for roots function in MATLAB coder, the output of roots is always variable size and complex. That explains the error and the output from your examples. You might want to change your condition from isreal to a comparison ...


2

You are performing integer math. You wanted something like int H = 7; double Hp = Math.ceil(H / 2.0); System.out.println(Hp); Output is 4.0 If you expect 3 you would need something like int H = 7; int Hp = (int) Math.floor(H / 2.0); System.out.println(Hp); Output is 3


1

Similar to an answer several months ago, the Statistics Toolbox doesn't support the Symbolic Toolbox currently. Therefore, you can proceed by hard coding the PDF itself and integrating it: d = exp(-(log(x)-mu)^2/(2*sigma^2))/(x*sigma*sqrt(2*pi)); int(d, x, 0, 10); Or you can use the logncdf function, which may be cleaner.


1

Per the documentation of bitxor, "if [both arguments] are double arrays, and assumedtype is not specified, then MATLAB treats integ1 and integ2 as unsigned 64-bit integers." So you just need to supply an assumedtype that can take on negative values (i.e., any int type without a leading u) like Result=bitxor(D(1,1:SYMBOL_SIZE),D(2,1:SYMBOL_SIZE),'int64'); ...


1

Sorry, I noticed you said you looked at the documentation in your question. My fault for not seeing that. As I understand it, with X and Y being your original data matrices, A and B are the sets of coefficients that perform a change of basis to maximally correlate your original data. Your data is represented in the new bases as the matrices U and V. So to ...


1

Let's break your question in parts: First he says that he uses a subset of the MNIST dataset, which contaings 5000 training examples and each training example is an image in a 20x20 gray scale format. With that he says that we have a vector of 400 elements of length that is the "unrolled" of the data previously described. Does it mean that the ...


1

I am assuming that you want to change your sim parameters whilst the simulation is running? A solution is that you run your simulation for inf period and use/change a workspace variable during the simulation period to make the changes take effect. for Example: If you look at the w block, you can set it's value in runtime, by doing this: ...


1

For more complicated printing schemes like this, I always go for fprintf. If your matrix is A with a FileID from fopen, you can get the output by fprintf(FileID,'%d & %d & %d & %d & \\$%d,%d \\\\ \n',A); More details on that format string can be found here. Since the last number should a comma-separated value, you'll need to convert it ...


1

Your regular expression from the first method is fine assuming that you are looking for a number at the end of the string. Because you have an ending ] character in your new string, your regular expression won't work because your string does not end in a number. As such, simply removing the $ character should work, as you want to search for one number that ...


1

Thanks to Fred Senese and rayryeng for the assist. I know someone may need this so here's some example code. This bit of code allows you to directly access maxima's symbolic solver from octave (allows you to execute multiple lines of maxima's commands). Since octave doesn't have a good symbolic solver yet this will come in handy for another person down ...


1

You could try the following (note that it does not check variable type): classdef Ret properties (Access = public) m = [] indcs = [] end methods (Access = public) function obj = Ret(T, ind) obj.m = T; obj.indcs = ind; end function x = getfirst(obj) x = obj.m; ...


1

You can use find: id=5; A(find(A(:,1)==id),:)=[] A = 1 2 3 3 4 5 Note that, as mentioned by Divakar, thanks to logical indexing you can even omit the find: A(3,:) and A(logical([0 0 1]),:) are equivalent so A(find(A(:,1)==id),:)=[] and A(A(:,1)==id,:)=[] will give the same result.


1

If you have only element as id, then I would go with @yoh.lej's solution without the find. But, if you happen to have a number of elements as id, you can use one of the approaches listed next. Approach # 1 (With ismember) A(ismember(A(:,1),ids),:) = []; Approach # 2 (With bsxfun) A(any(bsxfun(@eq,A(:,1),ids(:)'),2),:) = []; If the first ...


1

You could try to use: A = [1 2 4; 2 3 4; 6 2 8]; medianRows = median(A, 2); % to find every rows' median medianRows(2) Or: medianRow2 = median(A(2, :)); % every column of 2nd row


1

Here's a naive approach, where we simply apply the same rotation to a mask and take only the parts of the rotated image, that correspond to the transformed mask. Then we just superimpose these pixels on the original image. I ignore possible blending on the boundary. A = imread('cameraman.tif'); angle = 10; T = @(I) imrotate(I,angle,'bilinear','crop'); %// ...



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