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5

With ndgrid it's an easy task. [x,y] = ndgrid(1:n) m = x.*y Alternatively use bsxfun, probably fastest solution, as bsxfun is always the fastest ;): m = bsxfun(@times,1:n,(1:n).')


3

The simpler the better ; multiply the vectors: m = (1:n)'*(1:n); Best,


3

if it is a minimum-length answer you're after, you might want to consider: m = [1:n]'*[1:n]; But I suspect the bsxfun and ndgrid solutions thewaywewalk proposed are more efficient in terms of computation time.


3

OpenCV has a lot of capabilities to process an image but only minimal ones for displaying the result. It has nothing that can display vector graphics like Matlab. When I need to see polygons on image (or just polygons) I am dumping them to file and using third party viewer (usually Giv viewer).


3

Here's one vectorized approach - %// Sum elements of image1 & image2 along the third dimension corresponding %// to s1 and s2 in the original loopy code s1v = sum(image1,3); s2v = sum(image2,3); %// Pre-calculate all image1,image2 operations that lead to the calculation %// of d in the original code allvals = ((image1 - image2).^2)./(image1 + image2); ...


2

For Matlab 2014a and before applies the answer of Phil Goddard and you need to use e.g. freezeColors from FileExchange. In Matlab 2014b the problem got solved with the update of the graphics engine to version HG-2. Now the colormap affects all axes in the figure, unless you set an axes colormap separately. (from doc) figure ax1 = subplot(2,1,1); ...


2

You're getting closer. Here's what I'd do: x(1) = 1; y(1) = 0; %// x(2) and y(2) will be computed in loop %// my a[] vector was off in the comments a=[1, 1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, 0.001, 0.001, 0.0001, 0.0001, 0.0001, 0.0001]; for n=2:16 x(n) = x(n-1) - y(n-1)*a(n); %// multiplier goes here... y(n) = y(n-1) + x(n-1)*a(n); %// ...


2

You have to use strsplit which returns a cell array c=strsplit(test,'\n') As this is a cell indexing is done with {}, for example c{1}


2

In your case, you are interpolating at the points (1,2) (2,3) (3,4) (4,5). First three are elements of your input, they are basically copied. The last one is not within your input range so it's NAN


2

Having volatile data stored in code is bad practice, use a sufficient data structure like a Map instead: %just a helper for shorter code st=@(x,y)(struct('x',x,'y',y)); %initialise the data as defined in your first function T=containers.Map({'type1','type2'},{st(1,4),st(4,1)}); %add another type T('type3')=st(5,3) %get information for a type T('type2')


2

You can either use cell to comma-separated list expansion: %// Build cell: {':', ':', ..., ':', [1]} I(1:ndims(A)-1) = {':'}; I{ndims(A)} = 1; %// Expand cell to comma separated list and delete: A(I{:}) = []; Or convert to cell using num2cell and then convert back using cell2mat: C = num2cell(A,1:ndims(A)-1); A = cell2mat(C(2:end)); I guess that unless ...


2

Another approach is to use bwdistgeodesic to find order the corners by their distance along your edge. This should work for any polygon where you can detect a continuous edge. A = imread('Input Image.jpg'); A_gray = rgb2gray(A); A_bw = im2bw(A); A_bw1 = A_gray <= 100; % Find the edges A_edges = bwmorph(A_bw, 'remove'); [edge_x, edge_y] = find(A_edges'); ...


2

You can write a function: function bc = getBCFromTmpByPlatform(tmp) if ispc bc = fullfile(tmp,'toto'); else bc = fullfile(tmp,'tata'); end end and then just call your function wherever you would have called your original code.


1

The golden rule of speeding up matlab code is to avoid for loops and use vectorised code and matrices where possible. It's possible to do this calculation very quickly using vectorisation and logical indices. I've tested the following in octave and it works fine and is very quick - you may need to replace != with ~= for matlab compatibility. Adjust n and ...


1

The beta had an invalid assignment and you needed the { on the same line as the while: alpha <- 5.5 beta <- 3.1 a <- 0 b <- 1 c <- 2.5 X <- 0 Y <- c while (Y > gamma(alpha + beta)/gamma(alpha)/gamma(beta) * X^(alpha - 1) * (1 - X)^(beta - 1)) { U <- runif(1, 0, 1) V <- runif(1, 0, 1) X <- a + (b - a) * U Y ...


1

the function mean and the kernel you are using are both linear and do not represent the non-linear operation you are trying to achieve. One way of using conv and mean is by computing the 8 differences as different output channels ker = cell(1,8); for ii=1:8 ker{ii} = zeros(3); ker{ii}(2,2) = 1; %// for a(5) if ii < 5 ker{ii}(ii) = -1; ...


1

Try fullRecon = reshape( fullRecon, size(fullRecon,1), [], 3 );


1

In general, if you have N bit long value, one possible value, let say (in binary, i.e. epxressed using 2 bits (1's and 0's), where each bit, depending on its position represents a power of 2) is:1000 1111 0000 1010 The most significant bits are the ones counting from left to right, i.e.: the four most significant bits in the example are: 1000. So, truncating ...


1

The easiest thing would be to read in the two lines as separate strings and parse out the data yourself using regular expressions. Then from there, you can convert each date into a date number, plot the dates and if you want, you can plot the actual dates on the horizontal axis. Best thing would be to use fgetl twice once you open up your file using ...


1

In general, you consult first the documentation. If not available, use the search engine of you choice, for instance https://www.google.de/search?q=matlab+ode45+example to find as first result https://de.mathworks.com/help/matlab/ref/ode45.html There you find a multidimensional example function dy = rigid(t,y) dy = zeros(3,1); % a column vector ...


1

You can do this with input. While the command line is waiting for an input, the user can still modify the figures at will (zoom, pan, etc.). Here is a minimal exemple: % --- Load and display sample image rgb = imread('pears.png'); imshow(rgb); input(''); % [ Press any key when you are ready ] imfreehand You can also use this trick to do a little ...


1

calcHist works fine. Try the below way of choosing the histSize and range. Hope it helps !. float ary[9] = { 0.00598881028540019, 1.56120677124307,0.00598881028540019, 0.00669537049433832,1.37723800334516, 1.37723800334516, 1.36424594043624,1.56120677124307, 0.0152220988707370 }; cv::Mat srcMat = cv::Mat(1, 9, CV_32FC1, ary); int histSize = 2; float ...


1

You could do have done it in two stages, one for each loop of the original code. But because of the data dependency in the second loop, you need to break the second loop further into two stages and thus have a vectorized code corresponding to those three stages. Here's the final implementation - %// Initialize a new array with a copy of the input array ...


1

The function uiimport is used for importing data interactively. This seems to be what gets called by Matlab's toolbar's "import data" button. Excerpting from the documenatation, uiimport opens a dialog to interactively load data from a file or the clipboard. MATLABĀ® displays a preview of the data in the file. uiimport('-file') presents the file ...


1

There are many ways to tackle your problem. However none of them will ever be perfect. I'll give you 2 approaches here. Moving average (low pass filter) In Matlab, one easy way to "low pass" filter your data without having to explicitly use FFT, is to use the filter function` (available in the base package, you do not need any specific toolbox). You ...


1

Colormap is a property of the figure, not the axes, so changing it for a subplot changes it for all subplots. Have a look at Using multiple colormaps in a single figure for an example of a solution.


1

Use the third output of unique to get unique labels for each column of a, and then apply accumarray with a custom function: [~, ~, kk] = unique(a.', 'rows', 'stable'); %' result = accumarray(kk, (1:numel(kk)).', [], @(x) {sort(x).'}); For your example a = [2 1 5 3 2 1 2 1 3 4 3 2 4 4 3 4]; the result is result{1} = 1 7 result{2} = ...


1

%random example data data=rand(10,1) %create bar plot bar(data) %insert mean m=mean(data) %draw mean line line(xlim,[m,m]) %add mean to yticks to show on axis. set(gca,'YTick',union(get(gca,'YTick'),m))


1

Extend Ratbert's nice answer to arrive at a more general one which addresses the "edited" request: [~, ~, J]= unique(a.', 'rows'); Res = accumarray(J,[1:numel(J)]',[],@(x){x}); Edit: The above is a more elegant answer with accumarray (see the MATLAB documentation for more details) - equivalent to LuisMendo's answer.



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