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5

There are several problems in your code: fzero tries to find a zero of the function supplied as first argument. You are supplying an equation, not a function. Matlab doesn't know what e is. Use exp. The equation x+sin(x)==exp(x) doesn't seem to have real solutions. You probably mean x+sin(x)==-exp(x). Taking these three things into account, the function ...


2

I agree with David Kelley's answer for general MEX files but there is a special consideration for MATLAB Coder generated MEX files. MATLAB Coder generated MEX code is expected to be forward compatible but generally is not expected to be backward compatible. In other words, you are expected to be able to use such MEX code in a newer release than the one with ...


2

That's pretty simple. Create a new array that will store the prime number i (or n-i... can't say for sure) in an array should the value i (and n-i) pass the criterion, then return that array. BTW, you should move your y=0 statement outside of the if statement, because if n is odd, you will never see y being output and you'll get an error. Something like ...


2

While TMW says that mex functions are usually compatible between versions, it's not officially supported and quite common to run into issues with it. The only reliable option is to simply recompile the generated source code that Matlab coder created (i.e.i, the C code) in the version you want to run it in using the mex function.


2

The type emxArray_real_T is created because MATLAB Coder was unable to determine a fixed size or sufficiently small bounds on the size for your array in MATLAB, like 2x3. In this case the generated code allows the size of the array to vary at runtime by using dynamic memory allocation (e.g. malloc) and this data structure to represent your MATLAB array in C. ...


2

Using the code you provided, I added the line print("MyPNG.png", "-dpng") and ran the code from Saturn Fiddle. x=zeros(100); y=zeros(100); x(1)=0; y(1)=0; for k=0:100 x(k+2)=y(k+1)*(1+sin(0.7*x(k+1))-1.2*sqrt(abs(x(k+1)))); y(k+2)=0.21-x(k+1); end plot(x,y,'.') print("MyPNG.png", "-dpng")


2

Another way is to use textscan: fid = fopen('file.txt'); out = textscan(fid, '(%f,%f)\n'); result = [out{1} + i*out{2}]; fclose(fid); Make sure you change file.txt to be whatever your text file is named as. However, if you are using Windows (thanks Luis Mendo!), you need to change the \n delimiter to \r to denote a carriage return rather than a newline: ...


2

This is probably not the fastest approach, but it's simple: Use importdata to read the file. The result is a cell array of strings, each string corresponding to a line of the file. Use regexp to extract the numbers in each line. The result is a cell array of cell arrays. The first level corresponds to lines, the second to numbers detected within each line. ...


1

You could try a loop free approach like this: %generate all random indices at once idx = randomblocks(numel_block , 1000); %generate all Ys at once, organized with blocks along the first dimension, iterations along the second Y = reshape( X(idx) , [numel_block 1000]); %sort along the block dimension Ysort = sort(Y,1); Now depending on what Z = ...


1

You need to switch j and y and make sure that j is the same length as y. You can run the code from my Saturn Fiddle %Logistic model in its discrete form. r=2.5; y = zeros(100, 1); y(1) = rand(1); for j=1:100 y(j+1)=r*y(j)*(1-y(j)); end j = 1:length(y); plot(j, y, '.') print("MyPNG.png", "-dpng") ...


1

I would use dlmread instead of fscanf. Data type is hard since your dimensions vary. I wouldn't pad arrays... any benefit from not using cells would be overcome by the extra complexity and memory hit. Cell arrays are a reasonable choice. I wouldn't worry about preallocation too much in this case actually. Below is a similar option using structs with dynamic ...


1

Although I don't understand why you'd "combine" the rgb planes this way, this'll get you what you're looking for in one command. a = bitshift(img(:,:,1),16)+... bitshift(img(:,:,2,8)+... img(:,:,3);


1

An Array is a collection of same data type whereas a structure is a collection of different data types. In Matlab an array can contain variables of all data types. That's why when you are trying to convert from Matlab array to C array it is converting to a C structure instead of a C array because your Matlab array comprises of different data type.


1

You are missing the third index of the second rBool in your commented line: rBool(d,t,:) = (dU > (smallVal*U_first) | rBool(d,t-1,:)); Although I'd parenthesize it like this: rBool(d,t,:) = (dU > (smallVal*U_first)) | rBool(d,t-1,:); The version you originally had implicitly assumed r==1, I think. And you can simplify your code by setting U = ...


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Answered (hopefully) on the YALMIP forum.


1

You could use ismember instead of multiple uses of strcmp. index = find(ismember(data{:,{'type'}}, {'A','B','C','D'})); An alternative (because ismember will probably be slower than multiple uses of strcmp) would be to factor out the repeated code - x = data{:, {'type'}}; %# This isn't valid MATLAB but whatever... index = find(strcmp(x,'A') | ...


1

Updated: replace 1 character by multiple: Suppose you have x = 'a<bc' and want to replace the second character by ' less than ' You could do it like so: [x(1:1) ' less than ' x(3:end)] It will give a less than bc From here it should be straightforward to create a general solution. If you have the index and want to replace a character it is ...


1

Unless you specify the rows (and their order) with the Name/Value argument InputVariables, Matlab will simply take column 1 as first input, column 2 as second input etc, ignoring eventual grouping columns. Consequently, for better readability and maintainability of your code, I consider it good practice to always specify InputVariables explicitly.



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