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9

You are looking for the triu function img = triu( ones( 256 ), 1 );


7

If you care about performance, you can try a bsxfun based method - n = 256; %// resolution of img would be nxn img = bsxfun(@le,[1:n]',0:n-1); Benchmarks comparing BSXFUN and TRIU - num_runs = 50000; %// Number of iterations to run benchmarks n = 256; %// nxn would be the resolution of image %// Warm up tic/toc. for k = 1:50000 tic(); elapsed = ...


6

In your comments, you mentioned you wanted to resize an image using bilinear interpolation. Bear in mind that the bilinear interpolation algorithm is size independent. You can very well use the same algorithm for enlarging an image as well as shrinking an image. The right scale factors to sample the pixel locations are dependent on the output dimensions ...


3

you can use regexp to parse the string c = { '0.050822999 3.141592979 ; (1)' }; p = regexp( c{1}, '^(\d+\.\d+)\s(\d+\.\d+)\s*;\s*\((\d+)\)$', 'tokens', 'once' ); %//parse the input string numbers = str2mat(p); %// convert extracted strings to numerical values Example result ans = 0.050822999 3.141592979 1 Explaining the regexp pattern: ...


2

You can use the hist function to get the number of pixels for each frequency value. Then you need to implement the plotting part. The code is shown below: function myimhist(img) img = im2uint8(img); [count,bin] = hist(img(:), 0:255); stem(bin,count, 'Marker','none') hAx = gca; set(hAx, 'XLim',[0 255], 'XTickLabel',[], 'Box','on') ...


2

The command imwrite is used to save an image (=an array of pixel information). The figure generated by bar is not an 'image' in this sense yet. To save any figure as an image, you can use saveas It is good to know the handle of the figure to pass it to the saveas command, so you could use: hfig = figure ; bar(imhist(scene)); saveas(hfig ,'MyFileName.jpg') ...


2

Use print to save a plot as an image file. To save as a jpeg, for example, use print -djepg imageName but you can choose from all sorts of formats, read the documentation.


2

In MATLAB, if you want to create a vector from a number n to a number m, you use the format A = 5:10; % A = [5,6,7,8,9,10] You can also specify the step of the vector by including a third argument between the other two, like so: A = 5:0.5:10; % A = [5,5.5,6,6.5,7,7.5,8,8.5,9,9.5,10] You can also use this to count backwards: A = 10:-1:5 % A = ...


2

The bitcount=8, which means that a colour table (palette) is mandatory - see here. That means that the values in the pixel array (i.e. your variable bmpImageData) are not colours, but actually indexes into the palette. As such, you cannot sensibly directly modify the bmpImageData. So, if pixel[0,0] contains, say, 3, you have to look up the 3rd entry in the ...


2

It's X = tinv(P,V), but you have to have the Statistics Toolbox to use it. Excel TINV computes the 2-sided distribution for 1-P. MATLAB computes the 1-sided distribution for P. So for your example below, tinv(0.95,700) = 1.647. As a sanity check, the table of tabulated values on the Wikipedia page gives 1.645 for the limiting case of infinite degrees of ...


2

You can use something like this (if I understood you correctly) function str_dump(var) info = whos; disp([info.class ' ' mat2str(info.size) ' : ' var]); end This just shows information about the string. If you want to parse it and convert to another Matlab's structure, you have to explain it more carefully.


2

As stated in the comments, you are running into computer precision issues. For more detail see Why is 24.0000 not equal to 24.0000 in MATLAB? and http://matlabgeeks.com/tips-tutorials/floating-point-comparisons-in-matlab/. This is not a Matlab specific thing, it's a computer thing, and you just have to deal with it. In your case, you are trying to see ...


2

You can't assume the red channel is the same as the redness of a pixel by itself. A good estimate of redness of a pixel may be achieved by something like this: redness = max(0, red - (blue + green) / 2); Where red, green and blue are values of different RGB channels in the image. Once you calculated this value for an image, you can estimate the redness ...


2

You can set defaults for the inputs: function y = foo(a,b) if nargin < 1 || isempty(a), a = 10; end if nargin < 2 || isempty(b), b = [5,6,7;1,2,8]; end y = b*a end You can call foo() without inputs (and it will use the defaults for a and b) or supply your own values as: foo(12), foo(12,[10,20]), foo([],[23,23]), etc...


2

%// Input a = [0.050822999 3.141592979]; n = 1; %// Output str = [num2str(a,'%0.9f ') ' ; (' num2str(n) ')'] Result: str = 0.050822999 3.141592979 ; (1)


2

Use dbup to arrive at the workspace. Going back can be done with dbdown. dbstack provides information on the complete function call stack. For more info, see Debugging. Using scripts however allows you to access base-variables directly. So there is no need for assignin() or moving to the base workspace during debugging.


2

try this: [xg,yg,zg]=ndgrid(1:size(arr,1),1:size(arr,2),1:size(arr,3)); arr(xg>zg)=0;


2

To calculate P(X_k=z) for a D-dimensional matrix you can use xD = reshape(x, n*ones(1,D)); B = permute(xD, [k setdiff(1:D, k)]); P = sum(B(z,:)); It first makes it a D-dimensional matrix. It brings the dimension of interest k to the beginning and then chooses the z-th element and sums over elements corresponding to that.


2

I guess that you're trying to associate the set of strings for your legend, {'11-29-2013','07-01-2013','Temperature Difference'}, with the plots made from the variables ['float1winter','float1summer','tempAdiff']. However, this isn't how legend works. MATLAB has no way of associating the plot produced by plot(float1winter.T,float1winter.P,'b'); to the ...


1

It is quit easy, just make a loop and play with the size of the matrix O: A =[ 1 2 3; 4 5 6] O = zeros(size(A)) B = [A O; O A] B =[ 1 2 3 0 0 0; 4 5 6 0 0 0; 0 0 0 1 2 3; 0 0 0 4 5 6] I hope ur looking for this. clc A =[ 1 ...


1

Can you do something like: matObj = matfile('myBigData.mat','Writable',true); matObj.X(10000,10000) = 0; and then matObj.X = matObj.X + 1; or matObj.X = matObj.X * NaN; ?


1

The problem is that MATLAB doesn't, by default, wait for you to be done before moving on from cpselect. So it simply moves on from cpselect to tform before you have a chance to actually select any points, at which point input_points doesn't yet exist. You have to set the Wait parameter, and doing so also affects the outputs. With Wait on, call cpselect ...


1

This method works for me. Note that you have to specify the range for the matrix index (X(1:10000,1:10000)), otherwise you just set the single element at 10000,10000 to NaN. matObj = matfile('myBigData.mat','Writable',true); matObj.X(1:10000,1:10000) = NaN;


1

Well as written in the comments, you need to use real numbers with Delaunay triangulation. So don't forget to use z = real(z) and z_2 = real(z_2) before this part: % triangulation computation dt = DelaunayTri(x,y,z); dt_2 = DelaunayTri(x,y,z_2); [tri Xb] = freeBoundary(dt); [tri_2 Xb_2] = freeBoundary(dt_2); % plot geometry ...


1

Why do you use USRT(universal serial receiver/transmitter) at 9600 Baud rate? Your USRT setup "'BaudRate',9600,'StopBit',1 " means one byte(8 bit) of data is transferred by 10 bits (1 start bit, 8 data bit and 1 stop bi) on wire whose speed is 9600 bit per second, so 960 bytes per second is maximum speed of data. It is about one byte per ms(millisecond). ...



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