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4

I can't believe that nobody has thought of histc yet: count = histc(v2,v1); gives, in this case count = 1 %// 1 value of v2 is >= v1(1) and < v1(2) 2 %// 2 values of v2 are >= v1(2) and < v1(3) 1 %// 1 value of v2 is >= v1(3) and < v1(4) 0 %// 0 values of v2 are == v1(4)


3

Use pdist2. Assuming (from your code) that your vectors are columns, transposition is needed because pdist2 works with rows: [cmin, match_col] = min(pdist2(vectors.', input_vector.' ,'euclidean')); It can also be done with bsxfun (in this case it's easier to work directly with columns): [cmin, match_col] = min(sum(bsxfun(@minus, vectors, ...


2

You may use strfind as one approach - str1 = num2str(b <10,'%1d') %%// String of binary numbers indx = strfind(['0' str1],'0111') %%// Indices where the condition is met ind = indx(1) %%// Choose the first occurance a_out = a(ind) %%// Index into a c_out = c(ind) %%// Index into c Output - ind = 4 a_out = 4 c_out = 2


2

norm can't be directly applied to every column or row of a matrix, so you can use arrayfun: dist = arrayfun(@(col) norm(input_vector - candidate_vector(:,col)), 1:width); [cmin, match_col] = min(dist); This solution was also given here. HOWEVER, this solution is much much slower than doing a direct computation using bsxfun (as in Luis Mendo's answer), so ...


2

You can use sub2ind to turn index vectors into matrix indices. For example: x = randi(512, 4000, 1); y = randi(512, 4000, 1); val = rand(4000, 1); mat = zeros(512, 512); mat(sub2ind(size(mat), y, x)) = val;


2

The calculations of your eigen solver are performed using finite precision floating point arithmetic. The true eigen values and eigen vectors are not even exactly representable in finite floating point data types. Check for equality against a small tolerance to allow for this. That is check that Ax - λx is small in absolute value. Required reading is ...


2

Call the constructor of superclass A like this: B.m: classdef B < A %derived Class properties (Access=protected) arg2 end methods function obj = B(arg1,arg2) obj = obj@A(arg1); obj.arg2 = arg2; end end end From the documentation: By default, MATLAB calls the superclass constructor ...


2

This is actually a big research problem. You are correct, averaging all the descriptors will not be meaningful. There are several approaches out there for creating a single vector out of a set of local descriptors. One big class of methods is called "bag of features" or "bag of visual words". The general idea is to cluster local descriptors (e. g. sift) ...


1

Could you drop the for and switch statements and do it like this? disp(['counterA is ' , num2str(COUNTER(1,1))]); disp(['counterB is ' , num2str(COUNTER(1,2))]); disp(['counterC is ' , num2str(COUNTER(1,3))]); disp(['counterWaste is ' , num2str(COUNTER(1,4))]);


1

You're misusing case, friend. You're trying to switch by the variable name, but the variable name simply points to value that variable holds. Try this: for n=1:size(COUNTER,2) switch n case 1 disp(['counterA is ' , num2str(counterA)]) case 2 disp(['counterB is ' , num2str(counterB)]) case 3 ...


1

You can use this trick y1 = eye(10)(y,:); or it's two-step version y1 = eye(10); y1 = y1(y,:); Explanation In first step you create a identity matrix >> y1 = eye(10) y1 = Diagonal Matrix 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...


1

You could use sub2ind to do that, like this: a(sub2ind(size(a), table, columns)) Where columns is a matrix like table, but containing the column indexes, like this: columns = 1 2 3 1 2 3 There are many ways you could create that matrix. Here are some ways: columns = cumsum(ones(size(a)), 2) columns = repmat(1:size(a,2), size(a, 1), 1) columns = ...


1

Use a scatter plot with color arguments and a colormap: x = linspace(0,2*pi,100); y = sin(x); a = [1:100]; dotsize=25; clridx = 1:100; scatter(x,y,dotsize,clridx,'fill'); % create the colormap: color1=[25 25 112]/255; % Midnight Blue color2=[135 206 250]/255;% Light Sky Blue numcolors = numel(clridx); % create the gradients clrmap = ...


1

Try cell2mat output = cell2mat(inputImagesCell) You also misunderstood what a "cell array" is, edited your question, maybe it is clearer now. A cell array is an array of cells. inputImagesCell is a cell array containing 12 cells, consisting of a 65536x1 numeric matrix each. And you want to concatenate all cells to one matrix.


1

Your attempt for binary output of array data looks ok so far. However, you need to also write the array dimensions (rows, columns) before the data. Then, assuming these numbers are written e.g. as uint64_t in C++, you can read the file in matlab as follows: function matrix = load_2d(filename, data_type) fid = fopen(filename, 'rb'); rows = ...


1

>> v1 = [12 ;15 ;25 ;29]; >> v2 = [13 ;16 ;17 ;28]; >> diff(find(ismember(sort([v1 ;v2]),v1) == 1)) - 1 ans = 1 2 1 magic!! without loops!! But the logic is quiet easy to understand Using row vectors instead of column vectors as an example I first create a sorted list of combination of v1, ...


1

bsxfun can do all the tests you need, then you can vectorize the combination with & (element-wise AND), and sum: >> low = bsxfun(@lt,V1,V2.'); %' each row of V1 < each row of V2 >> high = bsxfun(@gt,V1,V2.'); %' each row of V1 > each row of V2 >> sum(low(1:end-1,:) & high(2:end,:),2) ans = 1 2 1 NOTE: To ...


1

I think this works without loops: V1 = [12 15 25 29]'; V2 = [13 16 17 28]'; V3 = [V1 zeros(size(V1)); V2 ones(size(V2))]; V4 = sortrows(V3); ret = diff(find(V4(:,2)==0))-1 This first creates the Vector V3 = 12 0 15 0 25 0 29 0 13 1 16 1 17 1 28 1 Then sorts it V4 = 12 0 13 1 15 0 ...


1

The problem is the SO orders the file names using ASCII sorting, as they're strings (it doesn't look to numbers differently). The string "10" is placed before the string "2", because "1" < "2". Instead of relying on the order, you could do something like this: imgs = dir('*.jpg'); for i = 1:numel(imgs) % Change the 'B' to 'image' newName = ...


1

The alpha channel is opacity, the opposite of transparency. MATLAB figures support alpha blending via the AlphaData property: background = uint8(255*rand(size(alpha))); imshow(background) hold on h = imshow(X); set(h, 'AlphaData', alpha) Result: Given another image Y and your image X with it's alpha data, you can use alpha to generate a blended image. ...



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