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Introduction The debate on whether bsxfun is better than repmat or vice versa has been going on like forever. In this post, we would try to compare how the different built-ins that ship with MATLAB fight it out against repmat equivalents in terms of their runtime performances and hopefully draw some meaningful conclusions out of them. Getting to know ...


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Using poly2mask to create binary sectors and using the resulting sectors for indexing Code: im = imread('peppers.png'); r = 300; out1 = ones(max(size(im,1),r*2)+2,max(size(im,2),r*2)+2,3).*255; xoffset = floor((size(out1,2)-size(im,2))/2); yoffset = floor((size(out1,1)-size(im,1))/2); out1(yoffset:yoffset+size(im,1)-1,xoffset:xoffset+size(im,2)-1,:) = ...


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You can use the efficient bsxfun - Delta = bsxfun(@minus,d,d.') - t


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If you want to save output exactly as displayed, you can use diary: % Save output to this file. diary('file.txt') A = 20 * randn(4, 4) % Stop saving output. diary If you want to save just the matrix, without other output from your script, then you can use dlmwrite with tab \t delimiters and a format of your choice, for example: dlmwrite('file.txt', A, ...


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Assume your image is in a BW array, you can find the center of the main disk with bwdist and then find the pixels that are anormally distributed with respect to the distance to the center. In practice, this gives: tol = 25; % --- Get the center D = bwdist(1-BW); [~,I] = max(D(:)); [y, x] = ind2sub(size(BW), I); % --- Find distances [Y, X] = find(BW); J = ...


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Matlab has a simple function for you to do this. You can use a morphological open operation to achieve this. The code can be found below. I = imread( 'O3Z7j.jpg' ); figure; imshow( I ) D = imopen(I,strel( 'disk', 50 ) ); figure; imshow( D ) The result is shown here. Essentially as Wiki describes it, morphological open is the "dilation of the erosion of a ...


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Check the following code segment. You may have to update as per your requirement. As an example think of how to avoid crossing circles. clear all; i = 0; j = 0; r = 100; nc = 2; figure; hold on; axis equal; viscircles([0 0], r, 'EdgeColor','r') while i < nc rr = randi([-r r]); rc = randi([-r r]); d = pdist([rc rr; 0 0],'euclidean'); ...


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Check the following code. I just did it for a grayscale image. You can now change it to a color image as well. Check and pls confirm this is what you wanted. clear all; i = rgb2gray(imread('hestain.png')); imshow(i); cr = floor(size(i,1)/2); cl = floor(size(i,2)/2); r = min(cr, cl); a = 90; r1 = cr; c1 = size(i,2); v1=[c1 r1]-[cl cr]; i2 = ...


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I might get you wrong. In any case what mkdir does is just creating a folder, hence the folder name must be known (possibly determined at run-time) before the call. A structure like folderName = folderNameLogic([run_time_variables]); % # folderName = 'something_run_time_variables(1)_and_run_time_variables(2)' status = mkdir(folderName) if status == ...


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This solution assumes that a and b are already sorted. If not, then simply replace them with sort(a) and sort(b). a = [ 2; 3; 4; 7 ]; b = [ 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7 ]; % Check each element in b for k = 1: length(b) % If this element of b is not contained in a if (all(a(:) ~= b(k))) % Replace with the next element in a that is greater than b(k) ...


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Pass an extra argument to csvread. If you look at the documentation for csvread, it states: M = csvread(filename,R1,C1) reads data from the file starting at row offset R1 and column offset C1. For example, the offsets R1=0, C1=0 specify the first value in the file. So, you can use an offset of 1 for the row and 0 for the column.


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You can use findobj to programmatically edit all figures. For example: ah = findobj(,'Type','axes'); % get all axes set(ah,'FontSize',Whatever); %this will change all the tick labels for m=1:numel(ah) % go over all axes xlabel_handle = get(ah(m),'xlabel'); set(xlabel_handle,'FontSize',Whatever); % this will change only the label %repeat for other ...


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You can do it this way: m = dec2bin(1:2^numel(someStrings)-1)-'0'; %// each row contains indices of a combination [~, s] = sort(sum(m,2)); %// compute sum of each row, sort and get sorting indices m = m(s,:); %// sort rows according to sum [jj, ii] = find(m.'); %'// find column indices (jj), ordered by row (ii) result = accumarray(ii, jj, [], ...


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You can achieve it as follows: intermResults=cellfun(@(x) num2cell(x,2),results,'uni',0); finalResults=vertcat(intermResults{:}); Explaination: If you look at your results variable, you have those 15 cells. You just need to extract out each row and make it a cell. This is what num2cell(x,2) does. By wrapping it into cellfun, I apply it to each cell in the ...


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if you know how many datasets you have, you encapsulate everything in a for loop like this: Data = [DATA_1, DATA_2,....DATA_N] ; outMat = [] ; for i = 1 : length (Data) [s v] = find_final_speed(Data(i)); outMat = [outMat ; s,v] end


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PCA extracts the most important information from the data set and compresses the size of the data set by keeping only the important information - principal components. The first principal component is constructed in such a way that it has the largest possible variance. The second component is computed under the constraint of being orthogonal to the first ...


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You can use following code newA = [zeros(5,1); A] About another case. You need something like inds = [2 5 7]; elems = [1 3 4]; W = zeros(7,1); W(inds) = elems


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Basically the extrinsic parameters are used to transform homogeneous world coordinates into camera coordinates. Afterwards the intrinsic parameters are used to map points in camera coordinates onto the image plane, which leads to pixel coordinates. Wikipedia quotes R and T and they are equivalent to the R and t of your projection matrix P. R basically ...


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The DCT alone effectively doubles the amount of storage required for an image. 8-bit samples require 16-bits after the DCT.


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Since all of "Undefined function or variable" errors were on variables, and all variables were 1 x 1 doubles, you have to just define them all as 0 prior to them being defined in a for loop. It seems you can not define them in a for loop.


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Given that your matrix is in X, it's as simple as: plot3(X(:,1), X(:,2), X(:,3), 'b.'); plot3 takes in three arguments as a base. The first argument are the x coordinates, the second are the y coordinates and the third are the z coordinates. Because you have all three coordinates conveniently in a matrix and each are in separate columns, you just have ...


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I created a file called turkish.txt with the characters you mentioned (ş,ç,ı,ö,ğ). Trying to read it gave me the following: fid = fopen('turkish.txt','r','n','UTF-8'); str=fread(fid); native2unicode(str') ans = ÿþ_, ç , 1, ö , As you can see, ş,ı,ğ are not rendered correctly. If you type help slCharacterEncoding You can see a list of most commonly ...


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After running with N = 1e4 on the code below you can see my results from the code profiler. N = 1e4; M = 10; needed = randn(23,1); choose_set = randn(33,8); pos = ceil( rand(N,M) * size(choose_set,1) ); for j = 1 : N testset = unique( choose_set( pos(j,:)', : ) ); if sum( size( setdiff( needed, testset ) ) ) < 2 no_solution = 0; ...


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This answer answers the original version of the question, not the updated version This is exactly what nchoosek does, when you input a vector. nchoosek([1:n],m) . >> m=2 m = 2 >> n=5 n = 5 >> nchoosek([1:n],m) ans = 1 2 1 3 1 4 1 5 2 3 2 4 2 5 3 4 ...


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As documented in the save function, you can save variables to file. As documented in the load function, you can load variables from file. methods(Static) function obj = loadFromFile( filename ) obj = load( filename ); end end methods function saveToFile( obj, filename ) save( 'test', 'obj' ); end end Caveat Note that you ...


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This option use a low memory a = rand(1000,1); Limit = 20; Acu = 0; N = 1; while Acu < Limit Acu = Acu + a(N, 1); N = N +1; end disp(N-1);



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