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165

It actually is possible to do what you want, but only if you use the functional form of the indexing operator. When you perform an indexing operation using (), you are actually making a call to the SUBSREF function. So, even though you can't do this: value = magic(5)(3,3); You can do this: value = subsref(magic(5),struct('type','()','subs',{{3,3}})); ...


141

The first function in an m-file (i.e. the main function), is invoked when that m-file is called. It is not required that the main function have the same name as the m-file, but for clarity it should. When the function and file name differ, the file name must be used to call the main function. All subsequent functions in the m-file, called local functions ...


136

I can spot a few problems with the code. The main issue is that the target is multi-class (not binary), so you need to either use 3 output nodes one for each class (called 1-of-N encoding), or use a single output node with a different activation function (something capable of more than just binary output -1/1 or 0/1) In the solution below, the perceptron ...


132

Use the class function >> b = 2 b = 2 >> a = 'Hi' a = Hi >> class(b) ans = double >> class(a) ans = char


129

Can you use R to replace MATLAB? Yes. I used MATLAB for years but switched primarily to R in the last 3 years. At this point, they have much more in common than not. It partially depends on your field and use-case. And as Spencer Graves said previously, it also depends on which "church you happen to frequent". It's best if you look at the MATLAB ...


121

With MATLAB Version 7.9 (R2009b) you can use a ~, e.g., [~, ~, variableThatIWillUse] = myFunction(); Note that the , isn't optional. Just typing [~ ~ var] will not work, and will throw an error. See the release notes for details.


118

Silly me. Forgot to import io... import scipy.io mat = scipy.io.loadmat('file.mat')


107

I've been working with OO MATLAB for a while, and ended up looking at similar performance issues. The short answer is: yes, MATLAB's OOP is kind of slow. There is substantial method call overhead, higher than mainstream OO languages, and there's not much you can do about it. Part of the reason may be that idiomatic MATLAB uses "vectorized" code to reduce ...


94

The short answer: the built-in function ARRAYFUN does exactly what your map function does for numeric arrays: >> y = arrayfun(@(x) x^2,1:10) y = 1 4 9 16 25 36 49 64 81 100 There are two other built-in functions that behave similarly: CELLFUN (which operates on elements of cell arrays) and STRUCTFUN (which operates ...


93

As far as I know, there isn't a direct way to do this like you've attempted. The usual approach is to use varargs and check against the number of args. Something like: function f(arg1,arg2,arg3) if nargin < 3 arg3 = 'some default' end end There are a few fancier things you can do with isempty, etc., and you might want to look at matlab ...


85

Writing a naive gaussian blur is actually pretty easy. It is done in exactly the same way as any other convolution filter. The only difference between a box and a gaussian filter is the matrix you use. Imagine you have an image defined as follows: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 ...


80

Actually, a decent shortcut method for getting the colors to cycle is to use hold all; in place of hold on;. Each successive plot will rotate (automatically for you) through MATLAB's default colormap. From the MATLAB site on hold: hold all holds the plot and the current line color and line style so that subsequent plotting commands do not reset the ...


80

Consider using MATLAB's map class: containers.Map. Here is a brief overview: Creation: >> keys = {'Jan', 'Feb', 'Mar', 'Apr', 'May', 'Jun', ... 'Jul', 'Aug', 'Sep', 'Oct', 'Nov', 'Dec', 'Annual'}; >> values = {327.2, 368.2, 197.6, 178.4, 100.0, 69.9, ... 32.3, 37.3, 19.0, 37.0, 73.2, 110.9, 1551.0}; >> rainfallMap = ...


78

Adam is only partially right. Many, if not most, mathematicians will never touch it. If there is a computer tool used at all, it's going to be something like Mathematica or Maple. Engineering departments, on the other hand, often rely on it and there are definitely useful things for some applied mathematicians. It's also used heavily in industry in some ...


77

You could use a colormap such as HSV to generate a set of colors. For example: cc=hsv(12); figure; hold on; for i=1:12 plot([0 1],[0 i],'color',cc(i,:)); end MATLAB has 13 different named colormaps ('doc colormap' lists them all). Another option for plotting lines in different colors is to use the LineStyleOrder property; see Defining the Color of ...


77

The function you're looking for is repmat. v10 = repmat(v, 1, 5)


74

My answer to this is the same as in an answer to your earlier question. For a probability density function, the integral over the entire space is 1. Dividing by the sum will not give you the correct density. To get the right density, you must divide by the area. To illustrate my point, try the following example. [f,x]=hist(randn(10000,1),50);%# create ...


71

MATLAB's FOR loop is static in nature; you cannot modify the loop variable between iterations, unlike the for(initialization;condition;increment) loop structure in other languages. This means that the following code always prints 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 regardless of the value of B. A = 1:5; for i = A A = B; disp(i); end If you want to be able to respond ...


71

I see two ways to solve this: The first way is to add some jitter to the x/y coordinates of the plot features. This has the advantage that you can easily modify a plot, but you have to draw the axes yourself if you want to have them xkcdyfied (see @Rody Oldenhuis' solution). The second way is to create a non-jittery plot, and use imtransform to apply a ...


70

Use numpy.tile: >>> tile(array([1,2,3]), (3, 1)) array([[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]]) or for repeating columns: >>> tile(array([[1,2,3]]).transpose(), (1, 3)) array([[1, 1, 1], [2, 2, 2], [3, 3, 3]])


65

figure; plot(something); or figure(2); plot(something); ... figure(3); plot(something else); ... etc.


61

Because i and j are both functions denoting the imaginary unit: http://www.mathworks.co.uk/help/matlab/ref/i.html http://www.mathworks.co.uk/help/matlab/ref/j.html So a variable called i or j will override them, potentially silently breaking code that does complex maths. Possible solutions include using ii and jj as loop variables instead, or using 1i ...


60

You need to use cell arrays. If the number of iterations are know beforehand, I suggest you preallocate: N = 10; names = cell(1,N); for i=1:N names{i} = 'string'; end otherwise you can do something like: names = {}; for i=1:10 names{end+1} = 'string'; end


60

Here's a function that searches recursively through all subdirectories of a given directory, collecting a list of all file names it finds: function fileList = getAllFiles(dirName) dirData = dir(dirName); %# Get the data for the current directory dirIndex = [dirData.isdir]; %# Find the index for directories fileList = {dirData(~dirIndex).name}'; ...


59

Zach is correct about the direct answer to the question. An interesting side note is that the following two loops do not execute the same: for i=1:10000 % do something end for i=[1:10000] % do something end The first loop creates a variable i that is a scalar and it iterates it like a C for loop. Note that if you modify i in the loop body, the ...


58

Have a look at Determine and count unique values of an array. Or, to count the number of occurrences of 5, simply do sum(your_matrix == 5)


57

One option which greatly improves the quality of the resulting image is to convert to a different color space in order to more easily select your colors. In particular, the HSV color space defines pixel colors in terms of their hue (the color), saturation (the amount of color), and value (the brightness of the color). For example, you can convert your RGB ...


57

You can get the idea by running other versions of your code. Consider explicitly writing out the computations, instead of using a function in your loop tic Soln3 = ones(T, N); for t = 1:T for n = 1:N Soln3(t, n) = 3*x(t, n)^2 + 2*x(t, n) - 1; end end toc Time to compute on my computer: Soln1 1.158446 seconds. Soln2 10.392475 seconds. ...



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