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11

Some alternatives: Using repmat: A = repmat(3, [5 7]); %// 5x7 matrix filled with the value 3 Using indexing: A(1:m, 1:n) = x; Following is a timing comparison between all proposed approaches. As you can see, @Dennis' solutions are the fastest (at least on my system). Functions: function y = f1(x,m,n) %// Dennis' "ones" y = x*ones(m,n); function y ...


11

If time is important (not programming techniques): function f = fib(n) if (n == 1) f = 1; elseif (n == 2) f = 2; else fOld = 2; fOlder = 1; for i = 3 : n f = fOld + fOlder; fOlder = fOld; fOld = f; end end end tic;fib(40);toc; ans = 165580141; Elapsed time is 0.000086 seconds. You could even use uint64. n = 92 is the most ...


9

You can detect inf using isinf(), and you can detect sign using sign(). Combine the two: newc = c; inf_filter = isinf(newc); newc(inf_filter) = 1e6 * sign(newc(inf_filter));


9

The conv function is right up your alley: >> x = 1:8; >> y = conv(x, ones(1,5), 'valid') y = 15 20 25 30 Benchmark Three answers, three different methods... Here is a quick benchmark (different input sizes, fixed window width of 5) using timeit; feel free to poke holes in it (in the comments) if you think it needs to be refined. ...


9

Method 1 The registry keys SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall provides a list of where most applications are installed: Note: It doesn't list all EXE applications on the PC as some dont require installation. In your case I am pretty sure that CMG STARS will be listed and you will be able to search for it by iterating over all subkeys ...


8

Create random integers between -3 and 2, but replace the zeros with 3s: x = randi([-3,2],4);x(x==0)=3


8

The idea is to use texture mapping as @Hoki showed. I tried to implement this on my end, here is what I came up with. First we'll need 6 images to apply on the cube faces. These can be any random images of any size. For example: % just a bunch of demo images from IPT toolbox function imgs = get_images() imgs = { imread('autumn.tif'); ...


8

As mentioned, nchoosek only allows integer inputs for the second argument. If you do want to make an inline function, you can fold the loop into a call to arrayfun, however: nCk = @(n,kVec)arrayfun(@(k)nchoosek(n,k),kVec); And use like this: nCk(5,0:5) ans = 1 5 10 10 5 1


7

Q: Will the same performance hit from growing the array apply, and if so will it be significant when compared to the time it takes to write to disk anyway? A: Yes, performance will suffer if you significantly grow a file on disk without pre-allocating. The performance hit will be a consequence of fragmentation. As you mentioned, fragmentation is less of a ...


7

I have a solution which renders ok by using texture mapping. The idea is to apply an image to the face and let Matlab take care of everything else. The great advantage is that matlab will take care of all the perspective aspects, and the rendering is pretty good. The small disadvantage is that you can only apply texture to surface objects, and since you ...


7

@David provides a neat solution for your specific problem. But the following solution will work for any set of numbers (note, they don't need to be integers), although I've set it up for your specific problem. OutputSize = [20, 1]; %Size of output matrix A = [-3; -2; -1; 1; 2; 3]; %Vector of numbers you want to sample from (can be whatever you want) x = ...


7

There are two basic ways to do this: A = ones(10,1)*3 B = zeros(10,1)+3 The first one is most commonly used in examples, yet if I am not mistaken, the second one performs slightly better. All in all it is just a matter of taste. Of course, if you have an existing matrix, there is another simple way: C = zeros(10,1) C(:) = 3; And for completeness, the ...


7

I think you are looking for something like this - idx = bsxfun(@lt,y1,y2) This will create a logical array of the same size as the input matrix y2 with 1's where the elements in y2 are greater than the corresponding elements in y1 and 0's otherwise. Best thing about bsxfun to solve such a problem is that it takes care of the expansion needed. So, what ...


7

Ok so in a nutshell, typically in microscopy the noise comes from 2 sources: 1) Gaussian/electronic noise This type of noise come from the fluctuations in the detector due to quantum effects in the electronics of the the detector. It is randomly generated and follows a gaussian distribution. Therefore in that case using a gaussian filter might be optimal ...


6

The proper way is of course using nearest-neighbor searching algorithms. However, if your dimension is not too high and your data sets are not big than you can simply use bsxfun: d = bsxfun( @minus, permute( bigList, [1 3 2] ), permute( littleList, [3 1 2] ) ); %//diff in third dimension d = sum( d.^2, 3 ); %// sq euclidean distance [minDist minIdx] = min( ...


6

Disclaimer Some of the other answers contain incorrect/inaccurate claims: you are trying to compare a vector with a scalar, that would never be true. You are asking if your vector == 1 which is not the case. As an example, if [1, 1, 1] == 1 disp("True") end will display "True". See below for an explanation. You write I cant figure out why ...


6

The runge_kutta4 stepper in odeint is nothing like Matlab's ode45, which is an adaptive scheme based on the Dormand-Prince method. To replicate Matlab's results, you should probably try the runge_kutta_dopri5 stepper. Also, make sure that your C++ code uses the same absolute and relative tolerances as ode45 (defaults are 1e-6 and 1e-3, respectively). Lastly, ...


6

This should work for you - A(any(A<200 | A>500,2),:)=[]; To state that generally - range1 = [200 500]; %// changed the variable name as %// range is already a builtin function name A(any(A<range1(1) | A>range1(2),2),:)=[]; If the number of rows to be deleted is a lot, for performance you might as well index into the ...


6

If I correctly understand what this equation is asking for, you are essentially extracting pixel blocks centered at each (x,y) in the image, you determine the minimum value within this pixel block for the red, green, and blue channels. This results in 3 values where each value is the minimum within the pixel block for each channel. From these 3 values, you ...


6

n = 2; fields = fieldnames(struc); getfield(struc, fields{n})


6

Problem is, that you use std::function, that actually use type-erasure and virtual calls. You can simply use template parameter, instead of std::function. Call of lambda function will be inlined, due n3376 5.1.2/5 The closure type for a lambda-expression has a public inline function call operator (13.5.4) whose param- eters and return type are ...


6

1) My first attempt at vectorization: function [Q, R] = Gram_Schmidt1(A, w) [m, n] = size(A); Q = complex(zeros(m, n)); R = complex(zeros(n, n)); for j = 1:n v = A(:,j); QQ = Q(:,1:j-1); QQ = bsxfun(@rdivide, bsxfun(@times, w, conj(QQ)), w.' * abs(QQ).^2); for i = 1:j-1 R(i,j) = (v.' * QQ(:,i)); ...


5

I think this does what you want. I've denoted your cell array as c. n1 = find(cellfun('isempty',c(1,:)), 1); %// first empty cell in row 1 n2 = find(cellfun('isempty',c(2,:)), 1); %// first empty cell in row 2 c(1,n1:n1+n2-2) = c(2,1:n2-1); %// copy the relevant part of row 2 onto row 1 This automatically extends your cell horizontally if the number of ...


5

There is a long discussion here, but, to jump to the answer. You have weighted the numerator and denominator of the R calculation by a vector w. The weighting occurs on the inner loop, and consist of a triple dot product, A dot Q dot w in the numerator, and Q dot Q dot w in the denominator. If you make one change, I think the code will run significantly ...


5

You can do this by using the linear index to each of the elements you want to address. Compute this using sub2ind: >> A = zeros(4) A = 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 >> B = [4 2 3 1] B = 4 2 3 1 >> i=sub2ind(size(A),B,1:4) i = 4 6 11 ...


5

You seem to have a slight misunderstanding of how cross-correlation works. Cross-correlation takes one signal, and compares it with shifted versions of another signal. If you recall, the (unnormalized) cross-correlation of two signals is defined as: s and h are two signals. Therefore, we shift versions of the second signal h and take element by element ...


5

Your question is pretty much fully covered in the docs to the save() command under "Save Structure Fields as Individual Variables". To get there, you only must create that struct. To create that struct(), where you dynamically create its field names, not much of your code must be changed. Once your struct is created in that loop, just save the struct once ...


5

You could do fprintf([repmat('%f\t', 1, size(c, 2)) '\n'], c');, which gave this output: 0.000000 0.818064 1.054641 0.342287 0.668041 0.717356 0.597756 0.804045 0.650459 0.815819 0.818064 0.000000 0.778921 0.485276 0.322136 1.157594 0.833495 0.363079 0.185730 0.060130 1.054641 0.778921 ...


5

The fliplr does only this: if ~ismatrix(x) error(message('MATLAB:fliplr:SizeX')); end y = x(:,end:-1:1); so you could speed up your code a little by just doing y = x(:,end:-1:1); instead of executing fliplr. You could also try @kmundnic suggestion, but it wont work when a is cell of strings, and issorted can operate on the cell of strings as well.


5

The symmetric flag when performing the ifft assumes that your frequency domain signal is conjugate symmetric or Hermitian. A function is conjugate symmetric when you reflect the signal across the y-axis and it is equal to its complex conjugate. In other words: What this actually means is that the sign of the imaginary part of your signal is opposite ...



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