Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

I can't really say that I'd understand the details, but apparently whenever the package python-dap is installed, then trying to import pkg_resources gives this warning. Here is some discussion. Following advice from here (comment 29 at the end of the page), I added dap as the first line in file ...


13

You could consider creating Collections of polygons instead of individual polygons. The relevant docs can be found here: http://matplotlib.org/api/collections_api.html With a example worth picking appart here: http://matplotlib.org/examples/api/collections_demo.html As an example: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from ...


11

You can add a matplotlib.patches.Polygon() directly to your axes. The question is whether you want your rectangles defined the plot coordinates (straight lines on the plot) or in map coordinates (great circles on the plot). Either way, you specify vertices in map coordinates and then transform them to plot coordinates by calling the Basemap instance (m() in ...


9

Yes it is possible thanks to matplotlib's event handling framework. I couldn't find an already written example which does what you are particularly interested in so I wrote one (which I will put forward for inclusion in the matplotlib source). I would read http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/users/event_handling.html thoroughly to best understand what is ...


9

Actually, for this you want to use a somewhat undocumented feature of matplotlib: the matplotlib.offsetbox module. There's an example here: http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/trunk-docs/examples/pylab_examples/demo_annotation_box.html In your case, you'd do something like this: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np import Image from ...


8

With basemap, you can generally just use normal pyplot style commands if you translate your coordinates using the map instance first. In this case, you can just transform the extent into uv coordinates with: x0, y0 = m(x[-1], y[-1]) x1, y1 = m(x[-1] + 0.5, y[-1] + 0.5) And then subsequently you will be able to do: im = plt.imshow(img, extent=(x0, x1, y0, ...


6

For reasons like this i often avoid Basemap alltogether and read the shapefile in with OGR and convert them to a Matplotlib artist myself. Which is alot more work but also gives alot more flexibility. Basemap has some very neat features like converting the coordinates of input data to your 'working projection'. If you want to stick with Basemap, get a ...


6

On Ubuntu, to install GEOS, this worked for me: $ sudo apt-get install libgeos-dev


6

In the modern definition of the -CAR projection (from Calabretta et al.), GLON-CAR/GLAT-CAR projection only produces a rectilinear grid if CRVAL2 is set to zero. If CRVAL2 is not zero, then the grid is curved (this should have nothing to do with Astropy). You can try and fix this by adjusting CRVAL2 and CRPIX2 so that CRVAL2 is zero. Does this help? Just to ...


5

Take a look at this question and demo : from matplotlib.pyplot import figure, show import numpy as npy from numpy.random import rand if 1: # picking on a scatter plot (matplotlib.collections.RegularPolyCollection) x, y, c, s = rand(4, 100) def onpick3(event): ind = event.ind print 'onpick3 scatter:', ind, npy.take(x, ind), ...


5

In case you create vector graphics, have you tried this (taken from http://matplotlib.org/api/pyplot_api.html?highlight=colorbar#matplotlib.pyplot.colorbar): "It is known that some vector graphics viewer (svg and pdf) renders white gaps between segments of the colorbar. This is due to bugs in the viewers not matplotlib. As a workaround the colorbar can be ...


5

As has already been said by @unutbu, Thomas' post here is exactly what you are after. Should you want to do this with Cartopy, the corresponding code (in v0.7) can be adapted from http://scitools.org.uk/cartopy/docs/latest/tutorials/using_the_shapereader.html slightly: import cartopy.crs as ccrs import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import cartopy.io.shapereader ...


4

For questions 2-4, you have to have GEOS installed on your system. If you have homebrew you can do the following: brew install geos Install homebrew here if you don't have it: http://mxcl.github.com/homebrew/


4

How to remove "annoying" rivers: If you want to post-process the image (instead of working with Basemap directly) you can remove bodies of water that don't connect to the ocean: import pylab as plt A = plt.imread("world.png") import numpy as np import scipy.ndimage as nd import collections # Get a counter of the greyscale colors a = A[:,:,0] colors ...


4

In the numpy example that you show, the author is actually using Matplotlib. While there are several plotting libraries, Matplotlib is the most popular for simple 2D plots like this. I'd probably use that unless there is a compelling reason not to. A general strategy would be to try to find something that looks like what you want in the Matplotlib example ...


4

When use map_coordinates, you need transpose the array or change you coordinates to (y, x) format, because the shape of the array is (height, width). from scipy.ndimage.interpolation import map_coordinates from mpl_toolkits.basemap import interp import numpy in_data = numpy.array([[ 25.89125824, 25.88840675],[ 25.90930748, 25.90640068]], ...


4

I know this is a an old question but I thought i would add my solution to this problem. I found your question when I was having the exact same problem as yours, i.e. a white line in my plot and a grid going from -180 to 180. The solution for me was to use the Basemap function addcyclic from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap, shiftgrid, addcyclic ...


4

Here is one way to do it: import networkx as nx import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap as Basemap m = Basemap( projection='merc', llcrnrlon=-130, llcrnrlat=25, urcrnrlon=-60, urcrnrlat=50, lat_ts=0, resolution='i', suppress_ticks=True) # position in decimal ...


4

You will need the python imaging library (PIL) installed. (See here https://pypi.python.org/pypi/PIL). See these answers for examples of ways to install PIL: answer 1, answer 2 Right, with that installed, the following code should do what you ask for: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib.ticker as plticker try: from PIL import Image except ...


4

You can create custom polygons using the keyword argument marker and passing it a tuple of 3 numbers (number of sides, style, rotation). To create a triangle you would use (3, 0, rotation), an example is shown below. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = [1,2,3] for i in x: plt.plot(i, i, marker=(3, 0, i*90), markersize=20, linestyle='None') ...


3

If your interested in doing a frequency count for each lat lon in a gridbox, you can use the numpy function histogram2d. The following code might be what you are looking for: nx, ny = 10, 3 # compute appropriate bins to histogram the data into lon_bins = numpy.linspace(lons.min(), lons.max(), nx+1) lat_bins = numpy.linspace(lats.min(), lats.max(), ny+1) ...


3

This is a very old question, but I thought it might be good to answer anyway. When you said curved lines, I assumed you meant drawing a great circle. There is an example of doing exactly that in the basemap documentation, which I have modified to make a little more easy to modify yourself: from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap import numpy as np import ...


3

You need to draw the polygons yourself. This can be done by reading a shapefile. See the fillstates.py example, which plots the US states (without Mexico or Canada).


3

Sadly not in an entirely integrated way, but most things are possible when you are dealing with an OO plotting library such as mpl. I worked on a change that implemented this functionality in a more accessible form about 3 months ago (https://github.com/matplotlib/matplotlib/pull/956), but we decided not to merge it as there were some fundamental changes ...


3

After generating some random data, it was obvious that the bounds that I chose did not work with this projection (red lines). Using map.drawgreatcircle(), I first visualized where I wanted the bounds while zoomed over the projection of random data. I corrected the longitude by using the longitudinal difference at the southern most latitude (blue ...


3

Inspired by the answer from pelson, I post the solution I have. I will leave it up to you which works best, so I will not accept any answer at the moment. #! /usr/bin/env python import sys import os from pylab import * from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap import matplotlib as mp from shapelib import ShapeFile import dbflib from matplotlib.collections ...


3

two (okay I lied, should be there) problems with your code i, your input longitude should be negative to be within the boundary you defined for your basemap, so add this after before converting to x and y longitude = [-i for i in longitude] ii, your coordinate conversion line is wrong, you should swap lon and lat in the argument list x, y = m(longitude, ...


3

You can use the following code to convert the coordinates, it automatically takes the projection from your raster as the source and the projection from your Basemap object as the target coordinate system. Imports from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap import osr, gdal import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np Coordinate conversion def ...


3

I am not aware of any robust matplotlib technique for doing what you are asking, but I may have a different solution. I often have to fill/extrapolate to areas of a grid where I am missing information. To do this I use a Fortran program that I compile using F2PY (that ships with numpy), which creates it into a python module. Assuming you have the Intel ...


3

Have a look at the matplotlib.markers module. Of particular interest is the fact that you can use an arbitrary polygon with a specified angle: marker = (3, 0, 45) # triangle rotated by 45 degrees.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible