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11

This is a pragmatic, rather than purely mathematical answer. I think you have two issues - one with layout, the other with your network. 1. Network You have too many edges in your network for it to represent the unit tesseract. Caveat I'm not an expert on the maths here - just came to this from the plotting angle (matplotlib tag). Please explain if I'm ...


6

The problem is that you're only converting the edges of the array. By converting only the x and y coordinates of the edges, you're effectively converting the coordinates of a diagonal line across the 2D array. This line has a very small range of theta values, and you're applying that range to the entire grid. The quick (but incorrect) fix In most cases, ...


5

You can save the image to memory as a file object (not to disk) and then use that when inserting to Excel file: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from cStringIO import StringIO imgdata = StringIO() fig, ax = plt.subplots() # Make your plot here referencing ax created before results.resid.hist(ax=ax) fig.savefig(imgdata) worksheet.insert_image(row, 0, ...


5

You could try the following to position your ellipses: choose an x-coordinate and calculate the height of the ellipse necessary to enclose the provided list of functions at that coordinate. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from matplotlib.patches import Ellipse x = np.linspace(1,10,1000) flogs = [lambda x, a=a: np.log(a * x) for a in ...


5

You can define a custom scale for the x-axis, which you can use instead of 'log'. Unfortunately, it's complicated and you'll need to figure out a function that lets you transform the numbers you give for the x-axis into something more linear. See http://matplotlib.org/examples/api/custom_scale_example.html. Edit to add: The problem was so interesting I ...


4

Even if I agree with the others that meshgrids are not difficult, still I think that a solution is provided by the Mayavi package (check the function surf) from mayavi import mlab mlab.surf(Z) mlab.show()


4

You can use symlog instead of log, which includes negaive numbers and a small linear region near zero. For your example, #!/usr/bin/env python def test_plot3(): import pylab as pl _graph = {0: 0.25, 1: 0.25, 2: 0.25, 3: 0.25} epsilon = 0.00000000001 x = [ pl.log(k) if k > 0 else pl.log(epsilon) for k in _graph ] y = [ _graph[k] for ...


4

You could set the alpha of the surface to something less than 1 so that its opaqueness can not totally obscure the red dot: ax.plot_surface(WH, WP, Z, rstride=4, cstride=4, cmap=cm.coolwarm, alpha=0.5)


4

When you close the image displayed by plt.show(), the image is closed and freed from memory. You should call savefig and savetxt before calling show.


4

This is the expected behaviour. Widgets will only resize to fit the available space if your hierarchy is widget -> layout -> widget -> layout -> .... Currently you have ApplicationWindow (QMainWindow) -> QMainWindow layout (internally created by Qt) -> main_widget (QWidget) -> viewsStack (QStackedWidget) The last layer has a QWidget ...


4

This does more or less what you want: from __future__ import division import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np def plot_ticks(start, stop, tick, n): r = np.linspace(0, 1, n+1) x = start[0] * (1 - r) + stop[0] * r x = np.vstack((x, x + tick[0])) y = start[1] * (1 - r) + stop[1] * r y = np.vstack((y, y + tick[1])) ...


4

As rth suggested, define x1 = np.linspace(0, 1, 1000) x2 = np.linspace(0, 1, 100) and then plot raw versus x1, and smooth versus x2: plt.plot(x1, raw) plt.plot(x2, smooth) np.linspace(0, 1, N) returns an array of length N with equally spaced values from 0 to 1 (inclusive). import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt np.random.seed(2015) ...


4

According to the docs the first parameter should be a contingency table. The fact that your way of doing things works at all seems to be an undocumented feature. The behaviour you're seeing (including your "funny" looking labels) is because many of the entries in your contingency table are zero, and something in the labelling code of mosiac is having a hard ...


4

Here I find the minimum of the distance between the two curves. Also, I cleaned up your code a bit (eg, vectorize wasn't doing anything useful). import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from numpy import sqrt, pi from scipy import optimize def A(x): return -1/( 8/(pi*x)*sqrt(1-(1/x)**2) - 1j*(8/(pi*x**2)) ) def B(y): return ...


4

For various historical reasons, matplotlib uses an internal numerical date format behind-the-scenes. The actual x-values are in this data format, where 0.0 is Jan 1st 1900, and a difference of 1.0 corresponds to 1 day. Negative values aren't allowed. The error you're getting is because you're trying to set the x-limits to include a negative range. Even ...


4

you can either set plt.legend(loc=...,numpoints =1) directly or create a style sheet and set legend.numpoints : 1 If you use a linux system: place your stylesheets in ~/.config/matplotlib/stylelib/ you can use them with plt.style.use([your_style_sheet]). Additionally, you can e.g. make one sheet for the colors etc. and one for the size: ...


4

When you are calling your figure using matplotlib.pyplot directly you just need to call it using plt.xscale('log') or plt.yscale('log') instead of plt.set_xscale('log') or plt.set_yscale('log') Only when you are using an axes instance like: fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) you call it using ax.set_xscale('log') Example: >>> ...


3

plot is a function of matplotlib.pyplot, so: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt plt.plot(range(20)) EDIT: To see the plot, you will normally need to call plt.show() to display the figure, or plt.savefig('figname.png') to save the figure to a file after calling plt.plot(). As @JRichardSnape pointed out in the comments, import matplotlib.pyplot as ...


3

Question 1 I think you've shown for yourself that the commands are not wholly equivalent and just want some reassurance of this. To do what you want to do - you can pass in projection to the add_subplot() calls that are used 'under the covers' by setting up a dictionary of subplot arguments and passing them in e.g. from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D ...


3

The method name is arange, not arrange. Also, after using plt.plot(...), you need to call plt.show() to draw the plot.


3

Just an example to plot a 3D scatter plot and using an user defined colour map. import matplotlib.cm as cmx from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib import numpy as np def scatter3d(x,y,z, cs, colorsMap='jet'): cm = plt.get_cmap(colorsMap) cNorm = matplotlib.colors.Normalize(vmin=min(cs), ...


3

You could use where=np.array(y)>0 to restrict where the filled region will be drawn and use interpolate=True to have fill_between find the points of intersection: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = np.array([1,2,3,4,5]) y = np.array([0,2,-3,4,-5]) plt.plot(x,y) plt.fill_between(x, 0, y, where=y>0, interpolate=True) ...


3

I have two options you might want to look at. First, set the axis location and size yourself as such: # your imports and data above fig = plt.figure() ax0a = fig.add_axes([0.1, 0.1, 0.8, 0.25]) ax0b = fig.add_axes([0.1, 0.39, 0.8, 0.25], sharex=ax0a) ax0c = fig.add_axes([0.1, 0.68, 0.8, 0.25], sharex=ax0a) ax0a.set_xticklabels([]) ...


3

This is almost a duplicate of a few other questions. The key is that matplotlib needs a ScalarMappable instance (usually an image, scatter plot, etc) to make a colormap from. It's straightforward to fake one if you're not using a plotting method that creates one. You'll need a Normalize instance to define the min/max/scaling/etc of the colormap and a ...


3

Please research before asking. There is a function in Matlab scatterhist which does this x0 = 6.1; y0 = 3.2; n = 50; r = rand(n ,1 ); theta = 2*pi*rand(n, 1); x = x0 + r.*cos(theta); y = y0 + r.*sin(theta); scatterhist(x,y, 'Direction','out', 'Location', 'NorthEast') Edit: Using the data you provided. Is this what you want? FWHM11Avg = ...


3

The documentation outlines that you have to use the edge_labels argument to specify custom labels. By default it the string representation of the edge data is used. In the example below such a dictionary is created: It has the edge tuples as keys and the formatted strings as values. To make the node labels stand out more you can add a bounding box to the ...


3

The problem is that you create two legends. You get nicer results with only one. For that you need to store the line artists: l1, = plot.plot(time, pressure, label=r'\textit{Raw}') # ... l2, = ax2.plot(time, needle_lift, label=r'\textit{Needle lift}', color='#4DAF4A') And then you can use them to create the legend, by supplying the artists and the ...


3

I think this is due to the fact that matplotlib uses anti aliasing when producing the figure. However, this is an artist property which you can set: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np x = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi, 500) plt.plot(x, np.sin(x), label='with anti-aliasing') plt.plot(x, np.cos(x), antialiased=False, label='without anti-aliasing') ...


3

You need to specify when you vectorize the function that it should be using floats: vheaviside = np.vectorize(heaviside, [float]) otherwise, per the documentation: The output type is determined by evaluating the first element of the input which in this case is an integer. Alternatively, make sure heaviside always returns a float, by replacing e.g. y ...


3

As the documentation states fill_between returns a PolyCollection instance. Collections are stored in ax.collections. So ax.collections.pop() should do the trick. However, I think you have to be careful that you remove the right thing, in case there are multiple objects in either ax.lines or ax.collections. You could save a reference to the object so ...



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