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4

This is an active area of research, so this answer may very soon be out of date. :-) To the best of my knowledge, the current fastest matrix multiplication algorithm runs in time O(n2.373), due to a result by Virginia Williams. The algorithm is actually a large family of algorithms that give rise to a complex nonlinear system of equations that give the ...


4

From the description in help("crossprod"): Given matrices x and y as arguments, return a matrix cross-product. This is formally equivalent to (but usually slightly faster than) the call t(x) %*% y (crossprod) or x %*% t(y) (tcrossprod). Thus, use crossprod(M).


3

The reason why your first test is so much faster is because there is a difference in the amount of work each test is doing. Actually, a factor of 50x. Big-O for square matrix multiplication is O(n^3). See: why is the time complexity of square matrix multiplication defined as O(n^3)? As a result, the 10k squared matrix actually takes 1 million times more ...


3

Subsetting rows of a data.frame returns a data.frame. Thus, you need to unlist it to get a vector: df1[,1] %*% t(unlist(df2[1,])) # Albany Birmingham Tuscany NewYork Atlanta Alabama #[1,] 5 10 15 20 25 30 #[2,] 10 20 30 40 50 60 #[3,] 15 30 45 60 75 90 #[4,] ...


3

You have a large number of problems here. First and foremost is this loop: for (int x = 0; x < N; x ++) for (int y = 0; y < N; y++) { thrd[threadCounter] = new Thread(new Threading(matA, matB, matC)); thrd[threadCounter].start(); thrd[threadCounter].join(); threadCounter++; } You run this loop before calling ...


2

the multiplication of the matrices has to be done for all the elements. so it should be in a nested for loop. what you are doing in your code myC[i][j]=myA[i][k]*myA[k][j]; this statement would multiply only one element of the matrix that is represented by the index i,j,k (out of bound in your code). the above statement has to be kept inside 3 nested for ...


2

You can use df1[,1] %o% t(df2) ## same as outer(df1[,1], t(df2), "*") #, , 1 # # Albany Birmingham Tuscany NewYork Atlanta Alabama #[1,] 5 10 15 20 25 30 #[2,] 10 20 30 40 50 60 #[3,] 15 30 45 60 75 90 #[4,] 20 40 60 80 100 ...


1

It can clearly be done. How about something like below for a simple SPMV (Sparse matrix vector multiplication), with the sparse matrix represented in the coordinate COO format (the simplest sparse format out there): class COO { int x, y, value; } public static ArrayList<Integer> spmv(List<COO> values, ArrayList<Integer> v) { final ...


1

When you use np.matrix() it is by definition a 2-D container and the operations must be performed between 2-D entities and will return 2-D entities: np.matrix([[1,2,3], [4,5,6]])*[[1], [2], [3]] #matrix([[14], # [32]]) np.matrix([[1,2,3], [4,5,6]])*[1, 2, 3] #ValueError When you use a np.array() in tha case of dot() between two 2-D arrays the ...


1

Apparently finalResult is a 1x1 matrix. If you print finalResult, you get the "str" or "nice" representation of finalResult. This format of the matrix doesn't include the text matrix( and the closing ); it just shows the numbers in square brackets. If you enter finalResult in a python prompt, it echoes back the "repr" of finalResult; this include the text ...


1

Out-of-core SVD or PCA on sparse data is not implemented in scikit-learn 0.15.2. You might want to try gensim instead. Edit: I forgot to specify "on sparse data" in my first reply.


1

In my opinion the reason why 2. is so much slower is that access pattern of matrix multiplication is not so cache friendly. If you need to get first value of first row and first value of second row, they are stored to memory very far away from each other. If matrix size increases, they are stored even further away from each other. This will lead to lot of ...


1

Or create a a = 1:10; and then set elements at even positions to 0 a(2:2:10) = 0 a = 1 0 3 0 5 0 7 0 9 0 EDIT (thanks to rayryeng for pointing out the rule !) And a one liner: a = (1:10) .* (mod(1:10, 2) != 0) a = 1 0 3 0 5 0 7 0 9 0


1

This only multiplies two elements, where i j and k are all out of bounds. myC[i][j]=myA[i][k]*myA[k][j]; It should be in a triple-loop, where you set i j and k appropriately.


1

A nice question that I asked myself as well. I don't have an answer, but this simple fact can save one of the transpositions: (B^T \times W) ^T = W^T * B so you'd write A = W.transpose().mmul(B)



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