Hot answers tagged

11

I know it's late in the game, but for what it's worth, there is a simpler way. my_matrix : matrix ([a, b, c], [d, e, f]); my_list : args (my_matrix); => [[a, b, c], [d, e, f]]


11

Try this. tex (''%i2); or apply (tex, [%i2]);


9

Note that quote-quote is only understood when the code is parsed. That's OK if you only work in the interpreter but if you put stuff into scripts, it is possible to have unintended effects. Another way to do this. It works the same in the interpreter and in a script. define (g(x), diff (f(x), x) - 8); See 'define'.


9

You can use assume. From Maxima's own documentation: -- Function: assume (, ..., ) Adds predicates , ..., to the current context. If a predicate is inconsistent or redundant with the predicates in the current context, it is not added to the context. The context accumulates predicates from each call to `assume'. `assume' ...


8

Michael's answer is good, but it does the differentiation everytime g(x) is called. (Also, normally you see it wrapped in a block statement to ensure that y is properly localized). There is a way to force the RHS to evaluate at the time of definition and with the general x. The syntax is (%i1) f(x) := 2*x^4; 4 (%...


8

Take a look at let and letsimp. E.g.: (%i2) expr : a + b*c + b*c*d; (%o2) b*c*d+b*c+a (%i3) let (b*c, k); (%o3) b*c --> k (%i4) letsimp (expr); (%o4) d*k+k+a letsimp differs from subst and tellsimp or defrule in that those other functions make only formal substitutions, i.e., replacing subexpressions which are exactly the same as some pattern.


7

Like this? (%i1) x: a+b; (%o1) b + a (%i2) y: c+d; (%o2) d + c (%i3) z: x*y; (%o3) (b + a) (d + c) (%i4) z: expand (z); (%o4) b d + a d + b c + a c (%i5) Assignment in maxima is done by :, not = (which is used for checking for equality)


7

Do you mean symbolically or numerically? Numerically you'd want to perform a Fourier transform: sample the function for at at least twice the expected maximum frequency (even higher if you want more precise measurement of phase) and for as long as at least your maximum expected wavelength perform a Fourier transfomr (searching for FFT should turn up lots ...


7

In Maxima's dialect, the correct name of the constant is %pi. With it, it should simplify correctly.


6

(I probably have no business answering this, but...) Just a guess, but it seems that integrate wants to make the input exact again, and maybe is doing some difficult bignum computations involving rational arithmetic. It rationalize your approximate e (Euler number) so that means it could behave differently from integrate(0 with exact input. Might want to ...


6

Have you looked at the Ryacas package which brings Yacas to R? The SAGE project has a focus on CAS and offers an R integration.


6

Good news: Maxima already has an Allegro port. You should be able to build it using ./configure --with-acl then type make. I haven't used this recently, but I would expect this to work. If you want to know more about how stuff is loaded, look at src/maxima.system. It's a bit archaic because it is written for defsystem, which has now been replaced pretty ...


6

Well, Maxima can be compiled via defsystem or asdf by several Lisps, including Allegro. See INSTALL.lisp for details. The only limitation that I know of is that the Allegro Express version cannot compile the SLATEC-derived code (the functions translated from Fortran are too big or something like that). So you will have to comment out the SLATEC stuff in ...


5

I'm far from a Maxima expert, but since you asked me to look at this question, here's what I have after a quick look through the documentation. First, looking at the documentation on matrices yielded only one way of turning matrices in to lists, which is list_matrix_entries. However, this returns a flat list of the entries. To get a nested list structure, ...


4

You don't say what type of system it is. If it is non-linear, you are in a very serious mess. In the linear case, You are trying to solve the system Ax = y, where A is not invertible. Even though it is not invertible, it admits a pseudo inverse, which you can stably compute using SVD.


4

The backslash operator gives the least-squares solution in Scilab.


4

I know Maxima tries very hard to avoid floats, and I think that's what it's trying to do here, but I'm not enough of a Maxima guru to explain how to prevent it. Pretty much anything numerical can handle this, although you might have to break the interval or transform the integrand manually. Note that you say it's fairly simple, but it's awfully steep: for ...


4

Use quad_qagi to numerically approximate an integral over an infinite interval. ?? quad_ shows info about Quadpack functions. load (distrib); pdflp (x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) := pdf_normal (x, log(p0), sqrt(t1)*v); cdfmaxlp (x, p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) := 1 - erf(x/(v * sqrt(t2 - t1)/sqrt(2))); upandin (p0, v, p1, p2, t1, t2) := block ([integrand], ...


4

Load the noninteractive package, which comes bundled with recent Maxima versions, before solving the ODE. You can load it with: load(noninteractive);


4

There is also rsympy (CRAN): rSymPy is an R package giving R users access to the SymPy computer algebra system running on Jython from within R.


4

Not sure if this is the simplest answer, but it seems to do the right thing for me (%i) g(x) := subst([y = x], diff(f(y), y) - 8); (%i) g(x); 8 x^3 - 8 (%i) g(0); -8 (%i) g(1); 0


4

Try the function mat_unblocker.


4

(1) To suppress output, terminate input expressions with dollar sign (i.e. $) instead of semicolon (i.e. ;). (2) To get just the TeX-ified expression sans the environment delimiters (i.e. $$), call tex1 instead of tex. Note that tex1 returns a string, which you have to print yourself (while tex prints it for you). Combining these ideas with the stuff you ...


4

I think you want coefmatrix and augcoefmatrix.


4

As long as you have an external command that returns the (rendered formula) output to stdout, the :read! {cmd} command will insert the output (below the current line or at the prepended [range]: :read! maxima --very-quiet -r "formula" You can make a custom command for this, too: :command! -nargs=1 -range Maxima execute '<line1>,<line2>read! ...


4

You can declare a variable complex: (%i1) declare(x, complex) $ (%i2) conjugate(x); (%o2) conjugate(x) (%i3) conjugate(realpart(x)); (%o3) realpart(x)


4

My advice is to find the extreme values the same way you would do it by hand: compute the derivative, solve for derivative = 0, and substitute any values found back into the original function. E.g.: (%i1) f(x) := (3*x)/(x^2 - 2*x + 4); 3 x (%o1) f(x) := ------------ ...


3

Just use tex1 instead of tex. This way the output won't be enclosed inside $$ delimiters. You can find more details on these matters in the Maxima reference.


3

Maxima's 'integrate' function does symbolic, not numeric, integration. When it returns a noun form from an integral, that means it can't perform the (symbolic) integration. Changing the parameters of the expression from exact to floating (using 'float') won't change that. I think what you're looking for is a numeric integration routine -- Maxima offers a ...


3

Why not just do (by the definition of definite integral): f(x):=1-2**-x$ gg(x):=''(integrate(f(x), x))$ g(y):=gg(y) - gg(0)$ '' (quote-quote) operator is used to force the evaluation of the :='s right hand side before the assignment.



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