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7

Your pip is probably using a different python, kind of you have vtk installed using /usr/local/bin/python, while your pip binary uses /usr/bin/python. Check it: $ head -n1 $(which pip) In order to get it solved, you can choose to use a virtualenv, or install pip using /usr/local/bin/python: curl https://raw.github.com/pypa/pip/master/contrib/get-pip.py ...


7

To comment on the visualisation part of your question (not the programming), I have mocked up some example facetted graphs to suggest alternatives you may want to use to explore your data. library("lubridate") library("ggplot2") library("reshape2") dates <- c("2011-01-01","2011-01-04","2011-01-05", "2011-01-06","2011-01-07","2011-01-08", ...


6

The trick is to interpolate over a grid before you plot - I'd use scipy for this. Below R is a (500,3) array of XYZ values and V is the "magnitude" at each XYZ point. from scipy.interpolate import griddata import numpy as np # Create some test data, 3D gaussian, 200 points dx, pts = 2, 100j N = 500 R = np.random.random((N,3))*2*dx - dx V = np.exp(-( ...


6

For this, it's easiest to explicitly create a scalar_field object from the input data. I actually do this quite frequently, as we like to put things in depth (where positive is downwards) in geology. That means that you need a negative increment in the z-direction. It would be nice if it was just an argument to the various mlab functions, but its still ...


6

Thanks Avaris for your response. I have a solution for now (I am not sure of it as a "fix"). I modified the following setting in Tools->Preferences->Console->External Modules->Enthought Tool Suite->ETS_TOOLKIT: change from Qt4 to wx. After changing this setting, I am able to execute code with Mayavi library and Mayavi plots directly from ...


6

Since the example pointed out by TJD seemed "impenetrable" here is a modified version with a few comments that might help clarify things: #! /usr/bin/env python from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np # # Assuming you have "2D" dataset like the following that you need # to plot. # data_2d = [ [1, 2, 3, 4, ...


5

I think you want to use point data instead of cell data. With cell data, a single scalar value is not localized to any point. It is assigned to the entire face. It looks like you just want to assign the t data to the vertices instead. The default rendering of point scalars will smoothly interpolate across each face. point_data = ...


5

Using the script recording of the mayavi pipeline, I found : s.module_manager.scalar_lut_manager.reverse_lut = True


5

It seems the problem is that the default value for the streamline seed widget's clamp_to_bounds property is set to True. You have to set this to False to actually be able to move the widget. st.seed.widget.clamp_to_bounds = False After adding this to the code, the final result looks like this: You may be familiar with this method of exploring Mayavi ...


5

You have a local file named pickle.py; this is being imported instead of the pickle module. This module then tries to import mlab before that module itself has completed importing in a circular import dependency: File "/usr/lib/python2.7/subprocess.py", line 432, in <module> import pickle File "pickle.py", line 4, in <module> from ...


5

The function mayavi.mlab.points3d has the scale_mode argument which can be set to 'none'. For example: In [23]: t = linspace(0, 4*numpy.pi, 20) In [24]: x = sin(2*t) In [25]: y = cos(t) In [26]: z = cos(2*t) In [27]: s = 2 + sin(t) In [28]: mlab.points3d(x, y, z, s, colormap="copper", scale_mode='none') Out[28]: <mayavi.modules.glyph.Glyph at ...


4

What's the problem? You just need to extract the indexes of the cells with values and pass those to the interpolate function with the 'height' values. There's some code that does this below. import numpy as np from numpy import nan from scipy import interpolate import matplotlib.pyplot as plt a = np.array([[nan, 3, nan, 1, nan, 2], [nan, nan, nan, ...


4

Thanks to mwaskon - for suggesting the mayavi library. I recreated the density scatter plot in mayavi as follows: import numpy as np from scipy import stats from mayavi import mlab mu, sigma = 0, 0.1 x = 10*np.random.normal(mu, sigma, 5000) y = 10*np.random.normal(mu, sigma, 5000) z = 10*np.random.normal(mu, sigma, 5000) xyz = np.vstack([x,y,z]) kde = ...


3

Use contours = [0] to get the surface F(x,y,z) = 0: import numpy as np from enthought.mayavi import mlab x, y, z = np.ogrid[-3:3:100j, -3:3:100j, -3:3:100j] F = x**2/3**2 + y**2/2**2 + z**2/4**2 - 1 mlab.contour3d(F, contours = [0]) mlab.show()


3

Given an axes object, you can just set the values of the label_text_property like so: axes.label_text_property.font_family = 'courier' axes.label_text_property.font_size = 10 Similarly, the "legend" font (I assume you mean the axes titles) may be set by: axes.title_text_property.font_family = 'times' axes.title_text_property.font_size = 14 It looks ...


3

This was asked on the scipy mailing list too. You can't do it with triangular_mesh, but you can if you make a generic surface using a triangular mesh as a source. s = mlab.pipeline.triangular_mesh_source(x,y,z,triangles) s.data.cell_data.scalars = .... # Your data here. surf = mlab.pipeline.surface(s) surf.contours.filled_contours = True ...


3

for values in stripped_header: volume_axis += [int(values)] * 100 or using itertools (may be more efficient) from itertools import repeat for values in stripped_header: volume_axis += repeat(int(values), 100)


3

As far as I understand, mayavi is build on tvtk, a wrapper of vtk designed for Traits support and an easier handling of NumPy. ParaView on the other hand is based on pure vtk, which makes it a tad less straightforward to manipulate ndarrays directly. However, some support functions are readily available: >>> from vtk.util import numpy_support as ...


3

You can use delaunay3d filter to create cells from points. Then you can create an iso_surface() for the output UnstructuredGrid of delaunay3d. If you want ImageData, you can use image_data_probe filter. import numpy as np from tvtk.api import tvtk from mayavi import mlab points = np.random.normal(0, 1, (1000, 3)) ug = tvtk.UnstructuredGrid(points=points) ...


3

Mayavi does not support LaTeX symbols sadly.


3

Just change to: ... for (x, y, z) in zip(xs, ys, zs): print('Updating scene...') plt.mlab_source.set(x=x, y=y, z=z) yield ... you don't even need the f.scene.render(), according to documentation mlab_source.set guarantees the refresh. Also since shape of your data doesn't change you don't need to use mlab_source.reset. I ...


3

Today, Mayavi is not supported in python3. http://www.vtk.org/Wiki/VTK/Python_Wrapping_FAQ http://www.vtk.org/Wiki/VTK/Python_Wrapper_Enhancement#Python_3


3

Each VTK source has a dataset for both scalars and vectors. The trick I use in my program to getting the color and size to differ is to bypass the mayavi source and directly in the VTK source, use scalars for color and vectors for size (it probably works the other way around as well). This is pretty much without doubt the easiest way to do it. nodes = ...


3

I guess this partially answer your question, but you could implement an error observer in python as explained here http://public.kitware.com/pipermail/vtkusers/2012-June/074703.html and add it to the vtk class you are interested. In c++ I find much simpler to redirect the output to stderr (this example is for windows): ...


3

Masking works based on scalars and not when you have set a solid color. Try this instead: import numpy as np m = mesh(X,Y,Z, mask=active_region, opacity=0.5) m.mlab_source = ones_like(X) The masking works by setting the scalar to Nan where masked. The geometry drawn is the same but the masked regions are not displayed if the scalars are Nan's. In any ...


3

As you say this is a bug that has to do with the translation between the mayavi layer and the vtk layer. But for now you could use this attribute: >> ax=mlab.axes() >> ax.axes.font_factor 1.5 >> ax.axes.font_factor=2 It only produces a small increase in size, though, as it rejects values above 2.


3

As @HYRY and @nicoguaro suggested in the comments above, Mayavi is much better suited for this type of work. There is a good set of examples here that I used for reference. Here is what I came up with import numpy as np from mayavi import mlab x = np.linspace(0,10,50) y = np.linspace(0,15,50) z = np.linspace(0,8,50) X, Y, Z = np.meshgrid(x, y, z) s = ...


2

I found that the mesh function actually does take a scalars argument, which then colors the corresponding point on the surface in accordance to the chosen colormap. I still however don't know how to map an arbitrary RGB image to the surface.


2

Thank you, gauden. R was in fact part of my research, and I have installed but just didn't go far enough with the tutorial. Unless it's against StackOverFlow rules, I'd appreciate seeing that R code of yours. I have already tried 2D representations, but in many cases the values for Tops1/Tops2/Tops3 (and similarly for Lows) would be equal, so the lines end ...


2

Mayavi does not expose control to other processes using pipes (terminology note: "pipes" not "pipelines"). If you wish to write a Python program that uses Mayavi for visualization, just use it as a library. The "IPython" instructions that you refer to are also valid for use inside of a full-fledged program.



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