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210

I believe the OP is long gone, but in case this answer is able to help future searchers, I thought I'd post a solution that I have found. I have added this code into my onCreate() method: EDITED: 07/05/11 to include code from comments: final TextView tv = (TextView)findViewById(R.id.image_test); ViewTreeObserver vto = tv.getViewTreeObserver(); ...


46

If you just want to measure the elapsed wall-clock time between two points, you could use time.time(): import time start = time.time() print "hello" end = time.time() print end - start This gives the execution time in seconds. edit A better option might be to use time.clock (thanks @Amber): On Unix, return the current processor time as a floating ...


40

I'll just add an alternative solution, override your activity's onWindowFocusChanged method and read them from there. @Override public void onWindowFocusChanged (boolean hasFocus) { // the height will be set at this point int height = myEverySoTallView.getMeasuredHeight(); }


23

The Stopwatch class is specifically designed to measure elapsed time and may (if available on your hardware) provide good granularity/accuracy using an underlying high-frequency hardware timer. So this seem the best choice. The IsHighResolution property can be used to determine whether high resolution timing is available. Per the documentation, this class ...


19

I just addressed this exact same issue a few weeks ago. Since someone is asking now, I'll share the code. In my exhaustive tests my code is about 10x faster than the C# example on Wikipedia even when no maximum distance is supplied. When a maximu distance is supplied, this performance gain increases to 30x - 100x +. Note a couple key points for performance: ...


17

In order to trigger a measure pass for a custom View you must call the requestLayout() method. For example, if you are implementing a custom view that extends View and it will behave like a TextView, you could write a setText method like this: /** * Sets the string value of the view. * @param text the string to write */ public void setText(String text) { ...


15

Given a function you'd like to time, test.py: def foo(): # print "hello" return "hello" the easiest way to use timeit is to call it from the command line: % python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.foo()' 1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.254 usec per loop Do not try to use time.time or time.clock (naively) to compare the speed of functions. They ...


14

I think it should be sufficient to call the UIElement.Measure(Size) method and subsequently check the UIElement.DesiredSize property. For more information, check the provided MSDN links.


13

It looks like I was using the wrong words - when I ask for request/response (as opposed to upload/download), I get a ton of hits. Here is the answer: curl -X POST -d @file server:port -w %{time_connect}:%{time_starttransfer}:%{time_total} All of the variables used with -w can be found in man curl.


12

It's not just that StopWatch is more accurate, but also that DateTime.Now will give incorrect results in some circumstances. Consider what happens during a daylight saving time switch-over, for example — using DateTime.Now can actually give a negative answer!


11

You are trying to get width and height of an elements, that weren't drawn yet. If you use debug and stop at some point, you'll see, that your device screen is still empty, that's because your elements weren't drawn yet, so you can't get width and height of something, that doesn't yet exist. And, I might be wrong, but setWidth is not always respected, ...


8

The same way you would measure anything. System.nanoTime() returns a Long you can use to measure how long something takes: Long start = System.nanoTime(); // do your read Long end = System.nanoTime(); Now you have the number of nanoseconds it took to read X bytes. Do the math and you have your download rate. More than likely you're looking for bytes per ...


8

There is a big number of string similarity distance algorithms that can be used. Some listed here (but not exhaustively listed are): Levenstein Needleman Wunch Smith Waterman Smith Waterman Gotoh Jaro, Jaro Winkler Jaccard Similarity Euclidean Distance Dice Similarity Cosine Similarity Monge Elkan A library that contains implementation to all of ...


7

Using time.time to measure execution gives you the overall execution time of your commands including running time spent by other processes on your computer. It is the time the user notices, but is not good if you want to compare different code snippets / algorithms / functions / ..... More information on timeit: Using the timeit Module timeit – Time the ...


6

Check out the timer function in the F Sharp Programming wikibook. It allows you to write code like this: let main() = printfn "fib 5: %i" (duration ( fun() -> fib 5 )) printfn "fib 30: %i" (duration ( fun() -> fib 30 )) with a typical result being: Duration (ms): 0.976500 fib 5: 5 Duration (ms): 24.412500 fib 30: 832040 See the link for ...


6

What you are looking for is called edit distance or Levenshtein distance. The wikipedia article explains how it is calculated, and has a nice piece of pseudocode at the bottom to help you code this algorithm in C# very easily.


6

Your original code can still work. How people will call it is what changes when you have parameters: With_Stopwatch(MethodWithoutParameter); With_Stopwatch(() => MethodWithParameters(param1, param2)); you can also call the method with parameters with the second syntax: With_Stopwatch(() => MethodWithoutParameter()); With_Stopwatch(() => ...


6

Each CUDA device has multiple streaming multi-processors (SMs). Each SM can have multiple warp schedulers and multiple execution units. CUDA cores are execution units not "cores" so I will avoid them for the rest of the discussions. The NVIDIA profiling tools CUDA command line profiler nvprof command line profiler (new in CUDA 5.0) Visual Profiler Nsight ...


6

You can use time.clock for that. import time start = time.clock() #your code here print time.clock() - start First call turns the timer on, and second call tells how many seconds has elapsed. There are better profiling tools like timeit and profile, however this one will measure the time and this is what your are asking about


5

I generally use StopWatch for this kind of situation. From MSDN page: StopWatch Provides a set of methods and properties that you can use to accurately measure elapsed time. In the following post I use it to compare the execution time of LINQ vs PLINQ: Parallel LINQ (PLINQ) with Visual Studio 2010


5

Neither will hurt the performance, because you say it is not that critical. StopWatch seems more appropriate - you are only subtracting time from time and not one date from another. Date stuff takes a tad more memory and CPU time to deal with. There are also ways to make the code cleaner, in case you plan on reusing it in several places. Overloading using ...


5

I don't think you need to specify types for variables yourself, let F# do type inference. So the below declaration is enough: let my_var = {X = 1.0<m> ; Y = 1.0<m> ; Z = 1.0<m>} If you don't want to specify record field names (which I think is nice to make your program clear), you can change your record to a class (like in @Tarmil's ...


5

Edit your code as below : Display display = getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay(); int maxWidth = display.getWidth(); int widthSoFar=0; int allItems = 50; int currentItem = 0; while(currentItem < allItems) { FrameLayout view = (FrameLayout) inflater.inflate(R.layout.fl, null); linearLayout.addView(view); view .measure(0, 0); widthSoFar = widthSoFar + ...


5

Whenever you design a fact table, the first set questions to ask yourself is: What is the business process you're analysing? What are relevant facts? What are the dimensions you'd like to analyse the facts by? What does the lowest (least aggregated) level of detail in the fact table represent, i.e. what is the grain of the fact table? The process seems ...


5

When you benchmark, you never benchmark just one run. Your timer is not precise/accurate enough to give meaningful results across that tiny amount of time. For example, the documentation for GetTickCount says: The resolution of the GetTickCount function is limited to the resolution of the system timer, which is typically in the range of 10 milliseconds ...


4

You have two options. Use System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch for specific methods. This is a high resolution timer in .NET which you can use for specific parts of your code. Use a profiler if you need to measure performance for your entire application. You can use the build in profiler of the Ultra edition of Visual Studio, or a tool like EQATEC.


4

From what I can see the Kindle app appears to use a similar algorithm to the one you suggest. Note that: it generally shows the % position through the book - it doesn't show total number of pages. if you change the font size, then the first word on the page remains the same (so that's where the % comes from) - so the Kindle app just does one page worth of ...


4

avoid the measure unit specification (1.0), is this possible? isn't m implicetly derivable from the declaration my_var : Vector3 ? Actually, 1.0 is equivalent to 1.0<1>, so you cannot use it in a context where a measure other than 1 (dimensionless) is expected. You can, however, use the inference by using 1.0<_>. avoid the use of record field ...


4

Several problems here: cos is expecting a unitless value, so you have to take the units off angle; given that velocity is expecting float and not float32, you might as well just convert directly to float (which removes the units). Then, you need to put the units back on. In first versions of units of measure, you could do this by simply multiplying by 1 in ...


4

If you can sacrifice ability to have default value for numberOfExecTime argument you can do it like that: from timeit import Timer from functools import partial def get_execution_time(function, numberOfExecTime, *args, **kwargs): """Return the execution time of a function in seconds.""" return round(Timer(partial(function, *args, **kwargs)) ...



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