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142

There are a number of different solutions for finding running median from streamed data, I will briefly talk about them at the very end of the answer. The question is about the details of the a specific solution (max heap/min heap solution), and how heap based solution works is explained below: For the first two elements add smaller one to the maxHeap on ...


88

The problem with the proposed solution (TheJacobTaylor) is runtime. Joining the table to itself is slow as molasses for large datasets. My proposed alternative runs in mysql, has awesome runtime, uses an explicit ORDER BY statement, so you don't have to hope your indexes ordered it properly to give a correct result, and is easy to unroll the query to ...


77

If you're using SQL 2005 or better this is a nice, simple-ish median calculation for a single column in a table: SELECT ( (SELECT MAX(Score) FROM (SELECT TOP 50 PERCENT Score FROM Posts ORDER BY Score) AS BottomHalf) + (SELECT MIN(Score) FROM (SELECT TOP 50 PERCENT Score FROM Posts ORDER BY Score DESC) AS TopHalf) ) / 2 AS Median


65

There are lots of ways to do this, with dramtically varying performance. Here's one particularly well-optimized solution, from http://sqlblog.com/blogs/adam_machanic/archive/2006/12/18/medians-row-numbers-and-performance.aspx. This is a particuarly optimal soluton when it comes to actual I/Os generated during execution-- it looks more costly than other ...


44

Any random-access container (like std::vector) can be sorted with the standard std::sort algorithm, available in the <algorithm> header. For finding the median, it would be quicker to use std::nth_element; this does enough of a sort to put one chosen element in the correct position, but doesn't completely sort the container. So you could find the ...


40

Skewness and Kurtosis For the on-line algorithms for Skewness and Kurtosis (along the lines of the variance), see in the same wiki page here the parallel algorithms for higher-moment statistics. Median Median is tough without sorted data. If you know, how many data points you have, in theory you only have to partially sort, e.g. by using a selection ...


33

I just found another answer online in the comments: For medians in almost any SQL: SELECT x.val from data x, data y GROUP BY x.val HAVING SUM(SIGN(1-SIGN(y.val-x.val))) = (COUNT(*)+1)/2 Make sure your columns are well indexed and the index is used for filtering and sorting. Verify with the explain plans. select count(*) from table --find the number ...


31

I know its been two days, but I'm posting just in case it helps. This problem was once posed at a TopCoder competition. You can find a discussion on several possible solutions in the Match Editorial (scroll down to FloatingMedian). For me, the C++ multiset approach looks easiest to code.


30

If the values are discrete and the number of distinct values isn't too high, you could just accumulate the number of times each value occurs in a histogram, then find the median from the histogram counts (just add up counts from the top and bottom of the histogram until you reach the middle). Or if they're continuous values, you could distribute them into ...


30

I use these incremental/recursive mean and median estimators, which both use constant storage: mean += eta * (sample - mean) median += eta * sgn(sample - median) where eta is a small learning rate parameter (e.g. 0.001), and sgn() is the signum function which returns one of {-1, 0, 1}. (Use a constant eta if the data is non-stationary and you want to ...


28

Its a little unclear how your data is actually represented, so I've assumed it is a list of tuples: data = [('Ram',500), ('Sam',400), ('Test',100), ('Ram',800), ('Sam',700), ('Test',300), ('Ram',900), ('Sam',800), ('Test',400)] from collections import defaultdict def median(mylist): sorts = sorted(mylist) length = len(sorts) if not ...


27

I found this post interesting and as an exercise I created this which ONLY does 6 comparisons and NOTHING else: static double MedianOfFive(double a, double b, double c, double d, double e) { return b < a ? d < c ? b < d ? a < e ? a < d ? e < d ? e : d : c < a ? c : a ...


25

In SQL Server 2012 you should use PERCENTILE_CONT: SELECT SalesOrderID, OrderQty, PERCENTILE_CONT(0.5) WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY OrderQty) OVER (PARTITION BY SalesOrderID) AS MedianCont FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail WHERE SalesOrderID IN (43670, 43669, 43667, 43663) ORDER BY SalesOrderID DESC See also : ...


24

Use numpy's median function.


19

Here is a solution that works on both even and odd length array and won't alter the array: def median(array) sorted = array.sort len = sorted.length return (sorted[(len - 1) / 2] + sorted[len / 2]) / 2.0 end


19

You would use a min-max-median heap to find the min, max and median in constant time (and take linear time to build the heap). You can use order-statistics trees to find the kth smallest/largest value. Both of these data structures are described in this paper on min-max heaps [pdf link]. Min-max heaps are binary heaps that alternate between min-heaps and ...


19

There is the 'remedian' statistic. It works by first setting up k arrays, each of length b. Data values are fed in to the first array and, when this is full, the median is calculated and stored in the first pos of the next array, after which the first array is re-used. When the second array is full the median of its values is stored in the first pos of the ...


19

Immutable Algorithm The first algorithm indicated by Taylor Leese is quadratic, but has linear average. That, however, depends on the pivot selection. So I'm providing here a version which has a pluggable pivot selection, and both the random pivot and the median of medians pivot (which guarantees linear time). import scala.annotation.tailrec @tailrec def ...


18

The streaming median is computed using two heaps. All the numbers less than or equal to the current median are in the left heap, which is arranged so that the maximum number is at the root of the heap. All the numbers greater than or equal to the current median are in the right heap, which is arranged so that the minimum number is at the root of the heap. ...


18

median() 'trips up' data.table because --- even when only passed integer vectors --- median() sometimes returns an integer value, and sometimes returns a double. ## median of 1:3 is 2, of type "integer" typeof(median(1:3)) # [1] "integer" ## median of 1:2 is 1.5, of type "double" typeof(median(1:2)) # [1] "double" Reproducing your error message with a ...


17

It's possible to answer the query without branches if the hardware can answer min and max queries without branches (most CPUs today can do this). The operator ^ denotes bitwise xor. Input: triple (a,b,c) 1. mx=max(max(a,b),c) 2. mn=min(min(a,b),c) 3. md=a^b^c^mx^mn 4. return md This is correct because: xor is commutative and associative xor on equal ...


17

My original quick answer was: select max(my_column) as [my_column], quartile from (select my_column, ntile(4) over (order by my_column) as [quartile] from my_table) i --where quartile = 2 group by quartile This will give you the median and interquartile range in one fell swoop. If you really only want one row that is the median then ...


17

If the set is sorted, finding the median requires O(1) item retrievals. If the items are in arbitrary sequence, it will not be possible to identify the median with certainty without examining the majority of the items. If one has examined most, but not all, of the items, that will allow one to guarantee that the median will be within some range [if the ...


16

I have looked at R's src/library/stats/src/Trunmed.c a few times as I wanted something similar too in a standalone C++ class / C subroutine. Note that this are actually two implementations in one, see src/library/stats/man/runmed.Rd (the source of the help file) which says \details{ Apart from the end values, the result \code{y = runmed(x, k)} simply has ...


16

The median is more complex than Mike Seymour's answer. The median differs depending on whether there are an even or an odd number of items in the sample. If there are an even number of items, the median is the average of the middle two items. This means that the median of a list of integers can be a fraction. Finally, the median of an empty list is ...


15

It's called a selection algorithm and wikipedia has a decent page on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selection_algorithm Also read about order statistics: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_statistic


15

There is no need to completely sort the vector: std::nth_element can do enough work to put the median in the correct position. See my answer to this question for an example. Of course, that doesn't help if your teacher forbids using the right tool for the job.


15

If you are looking for the most efficient solution, I would imagine that it is something like this: if (array[randomIndexA] > array[randomIndexB]) { if (array[randomIndexB] > array[randomIndexC]) { return "b is the middle value"; } else if (array[randomIndexA] > array[randomIndexC]) { return "c is the middle value"; } else { ...


15

If you can't hold all the items in memory at once, this problem becomes much harder. The heap solution requires you to hold all the elements in memory at once. This is not possible in most real world applications of this problem. Instead, as you see numbers, keep track of the count of the number of times you see each integer. Assuming 4 byte integers, ...


14

Do not use that function. It is deeply flawed. Check this out: int[] tempArray = array; Array.Sort(tempArray); Arrays are reference types in C#. This sorts the array that you give it, not a copy. Obtaining the median of an array should not change its order; it might already be sorted into a different order. Use Array.Copy to first make a copy of ...



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