New answers tagged

1

data['artist_hotness'] = data['artist_hotness'].map( lambda x : data.artist_hotness.mean() if x == 0 else x)


1

use pandas replace method: df = pd.DataFrame({'a': [1,2,3,4,0,0,0,0], 'b': [2,3,4,6,0,5,3,8]}) df a b 0 1 2 1 2 3 2 3 4 3 4 6 4 0 0 5 0 5 6 0 3 7 0 8 df['a']=df['a'].replace(0,df['a'].mean()) df a b 0 1 2 1 2 3 2 3 4 3 4 6 4 1 0 5 1 5 6 1 3 7 1 8


2

I think you can use mask and add parameter skipna=True to mean instead dropna. Also need change condition to data.artist_hotness == 0 if need replace 0 values or data.artist_hotness.isnull() if need replace NaN values: import pandas as pd import numpy as np data = pd.DataFrame({'artist_hotness': [0,1,5,np.nan]}) print (data) artist_hotness 0 ...


0

I faced the same problem yesterday and I wrote a solution similar to sifho's one. I used generics in order to calculate the median on every collection of Numbers, you can apply this method to collections of Doubles, Integers, Floats... and so on. Returns a double. Please consider that my method creates another collection in order to not alter the original ...


5

First linearize by indexing with (:). This transforms any array into a column array. Then compute the median: M = median(A(:)); I don't think that indexing with (:) needs any memory reallocation. It just reads the array in column-major order.


0

Here what I came up with during this exercise in Codecademy: def median(data): new_list = sorted(data) if len(new_list)%2 > 0: return new_list[len(new_list)/2] elif len(new_list)%2 == 0: return (new_list[(len(new_list)/2)] + new_list[(len(new_list)/2)-1]) /2.0 print median([1,2,3,4,5,9])


1

... how can they say that the median of the merged arrays would be the median of the merged arrays resulting after pruning the halves of the arrays i.e. the median of merge array of {1, 12, 15, 26, 38} and {2, 13, 17, 30, 45} would be the median of the merge array of {2,13,17} and {15, 26, 38}. This is because of the inequality that you used to ...


0

You can do: $ awk '{split($0,a);asort(a);mid=int(NF/2);NF%2!=0?median=a[mid+1]:median=(a[mid]+a[mid+1])/2;print median}' file.txt 8 20 20


0

The ... argument of the apply() function allows you to pass optional arguments to your function. Alternatively, you can also define a custom function. Assuming that your median weights are identical for all rows, the answer to your question looks like this: x <- rnorm(100) y <- rnorm(100) M <- matrix(sample(x, rep=TRUE, 10^4*length(x)), nrow=10^4) ...


0

This is a great question, especially since you can find the median of a list of numbers in O(N) time using Quickselect. But the dual priority-queue approach gives you O(N log N) unfortunately. Riffing in binary heap wiki article here, heapify is a bottom-up operation. You have all the data in hand and this allows you to be cunning and reduce the number of ...


1

When there is one element, the complexity of the step is Log 1 because of a single element being in a single heap. When there are two elements, the complexity of the step is Log 1 as we have one element in each heap. When there are four elements, the complexity of the step is Log 2 as we have two elements in each heap. So, when there are n elements, the ...


4

Linear time heapify is for the cost of building a heap from an unsorted array as a batch operation, not for building a heap by inserting values one at a time. Consider a min heap where you are inserting a stream of values in increasing order. The value at the top of the heap is the smallest, so each value trickles all the way down to the bottom of the ...


0

There is a trick using group_concat(), but that might not work (because of intermediate string lengths). A better method is simply to enumerate the rows and then use conditional aggregation. Alas, though, this requires two levels of enumeration: SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(DAY, T1.time1, T2.time2) as diff, AVG(CASE WHEN 2*@rn IN (cnt - 1, cnt, cnt + 1 ...


0

Let's say we have two arrays A and B, of sizes m, and n respectively, with m <= n. Then we have the following: Lemma: The median of A and B is the same as the median of A and B', where B' is the middle m or m + 1 elements of B, depending on whether m and n have the same parity or not. Now it only remains to use your O(log(m + n)) algorithm to find ...


0

Just do this ... else everything is correct: return new Double(minHeap.peek() + maxHeap.peek()) / 2.0;


0

The last query in my post on MEDIAN shows how to get the it as OLAP result, you need to add another nesting level: SELECT sales_segment, pickup_yyyymm, ..., MIN(Median_Days) over(partition by sales_segment,pickup_yyyymm) AS Median_Days FROM ( SELECT sales_segment, pickup_yyyymm, Days, COUNT(*) over(partition by ...


1

You can use by to do split the data frame and perform this function on each piece: by(Clean, Clean$State, FUN=function(x) median(rep(x$medicare_average_payment, x$Frequency)) )


1

We can try with dplyr library(dplyr) Clean1 <- Clean[rep(1:nrow(Clean), Clean$Frequency),] Clean1 %>% group_by(State) %>% summarise(Median = median(medicare_average_payment)) Or using data.table library(data.table) setDT(Clean)[, .(Median = median(rep(medicare_average_payment, Frequency))) , State]



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