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0

With the glibc memcpy code you included, there is no way to call the function without the memory already being aligned. If you were to write your own, the way I see it, there are two of possible alignments for the memcpy: 1) Both of the buffers are offset from a four-byte boundary by the same amount, or both are already on a four-byte boundary. (src % 4 == ...


0

...so at first the destination address which was aligned at first properly might not be aligned properly now. So is there any way to align both? I found this article on memcpy optimization which I believe discusses what you are trying to do in length... (see link below code example) modified-GNU algorithm: void * memcpy(void * dst, void const * src, ...


1

Because you need to null terminate titulo. Example char line[] = "PRINCIPAL,1.Liga,2.Clubes,3.Jogadores,4.Relatorios,5.Sair;"; char *pointer = strchr(line, ','); if (pointer != NULL) { char *substr; size_t length; length = pointer - line; /* Perhaps check if `length == 0', but it doesn't matter * because you would end up with an empty ...


3

The buffer you have is not a string. You can't treat it like one by passing it to functions expecting a string such as strcat, strcpy, strcmp, or the %s format specifier of printf. You have an array of characters, so print them as such: int i; for (i=0;i<sizeof(buffer);i++) { printf("%02hhX ", buffer[i]); } printf("\n");


2

For devices with UVA in effect, you can use the mechanism you describe. This doc section may be of interest (both the one describing device-to-device transfers as well as the subsequent section on UVA implications). Otherwise there is a cudaMemcpyPeer() API available, which has somewhat different semantics. How are pointers to memory on different ...


0

When searching a line for an occurrence of a word, you need a pointer to advance over each character in the line, a search term, comparison of the current character with the first character in search term, further comparison if there is a match, and then a set of delimiters to limit the comparisons as required to, for example, if searching for 'the' only ...


3

Additionally to the other suggestions you can also use: snprintf(decimali, sizeof(decimali), "%.4s", cifre); This has the advantage, that no buffer overruns can occur and the string will be guaranteed terminated.


4

Append one more statement char *a = memcpy(decimali, cifre, 4); a[4] = '\0'; and you will get the expected result. Strings must have a terminating zero. The format specifier %s of function printf considers the corresponding argument as a pointer to a string. Otherwise you have to write printf("%4.4s", decimali);


10

This is undefined behavior; the %s format specifier to printf() expects a string, and a string in C is terminated by a character with the value '\0'. Your use of memcpy() doesn't know this, and doesn't terminate the data in decimali. Thus, it's not a string and not valid for printing out like that. The fix is to add termination manually: decimali[4] = ...


3

After copying, there is no '\0' at the end and therefore decimali is not null terminated. %s expects a null terminated string, otherwise using wrong datatype for a format specifier invoke undefined behavior. In this case result could be either expected or unexpected, though a possible explanation for the output can be the case that printf with %s read ...


7

ptr does not point to anything, so attemp to change data it points to leads to crash. You probably want to do memcpy(&ptr, &b, sizeof(b)); (Change value of ptr itself)


2

Others have mentioned that the memcpy is not correct due to using sizeof(void*) as the number of bytes to copy. But changing the sizeof to an appropriate value will just have you hit the next stumbling block with using memcpy. You would probably encounter it as soon as you execute this line: cout<<test.data->name<<endl The reason is that ...


0

Also I suppose it could be problem here cout<<test.data->name<<endl; case data is void pointer so you need cast here cout<<static_cast<product *>(test.data)->name<<endl;


6

Your code has multiple issues, but a direct cause of SIGSEGV is following line: memcpy(data, ptr, sizeof(ptr)); which tries to copy a number of bytes into unallocated pointer data. On a side note, it looks like you are trying to achieve polymorphism in C++ using completely inapproriate methods.


1

memcpy takes pointers as first two parameters. Since it is not obvious from your code what are the data types of scmr0Reg_ and scMem, I assume they are some objects. In this case you need to pass pointers to them as memcpy(&scmr0Reg_, &scMem...


0

Just write readable code and all problems will usually go away: void copy_floats (float* dest, const float* src, size_t items_n, size_t copies_n) { for(size_t i=0; i<copies_n; i++) { memcpy(&dest[i * items_n], src, sizeof(*src) * items_n); ...


3

test is a float pointer, sizeof(tmp) is byte in size. Pointer arithmetic will cause you to go to a wrong offset. try: memcpy(test + ((sizeof(tmp)/sizeof(tmp[0]))*1), tmp, sizeof(tmp))


1

TT - thanks for reply. It led me to experiment. The built-in function unsafe.copyMemory does copy objects from on-heap to off-heap. Here is my sample code. I was only interested in copying elements so I added 16 as primitive array offset. byte b[]=new byte[N]; long addressOfObject=getAddressOfObject(unsafe, b); unsafe.copyMemory(b, 16, null, directOffset, ...



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