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6

As soon as you re-assign your pointer without using delete[] to de-allocate that allocated memory on the heap, you create a memory leak. This will happen if you loop your aFunction() as it re-assigns the pointer every time it is called. As for your second question, your destructor will only delete[] the last array assigned to the pointer.


5

Java's GC is smart enough to deal with circular references, it starts from GC roots down to objects to check if they are still alive or not. So if you have an object of type A that is not referenced from anywhere ( ie: GC root) it will be eligible for garbage collection even if it references B. A circular linked list does something similar all the time.


5

You are never freeing the pointers passed to your objects, so their destructors will never be called. You need to delete the pointers in your destructor, to make sure the destructor of the stored object is called too: class D: public P { P *q; public: D(P *p) : q(p) { cout << "D()" << endl; } ~D() { delete q; cout << "~D()" ...


4

Just because you free memory does not mean that it is immediately returned to the operating system. Your standard library likely has a pile of memory that it has obtained from the OS but which is not current in use in your program. This is not leaked memory, and it is usually not a problem in practice.


3

The leaks are not from your code Transcribing comments with minimal editing. Add suppressions; they're 'leaks' caused by the startup code that can't be fixed by you and probably won't be fixed by the developers of the C++ runtime. This is an extensive problem on Mac OS X. There are typically many allocations and a few tens of kilobytes of memory that ...


2

I would say it depends. As long there there are no references kept and the garbage collector can do his job, you don't have to. But otherwise it is good practice to do so to prevent memory leaks. So I prefer doing this. To unsibscribe lambda events, just store it in a variable or field EventHandler buttonOnClick = (sender, args) => button.Text = ...


2

I think I got a repro for this problem although I can't tell what your MainWindow.Open/CloseWindow() methods look like. Using a thread is certainly part of the problem, there is one non-intuitive thing you have to do to prevent leaking internal WPF plumbing objects that have thread affinity. It is imperative to shutdown the dispatcher for the thread. This ...


2

Only delete[] frees the memory that was allocated by new. And every time you use new, you need a delete. For the other question, based on the Documentation: MyClass * p1 = new MyClass[5]; // allocates and constructs five objects


2

It is possible using nodrop, but it could leak. fn map_inner<I, S, F, T, N>(list: I, f: F) -> GenericArray<T, N> where I: IntoIterator<Item=S>, F: Fn(&S) -> T, N: ArrayLength<T> { unsafe { // pre-leak the whole array, it's uninitialized anyway let mut res : NoDrop<GenericArray<T, N>> = ...


2

Yes, there is a memory leak when you call the function more than once, without explicitly deallocating handler.ptrToInts after each call; void aFunction() { handler.ptrToInts = new int[20]; } //-----somewhere we see the caller while(!quit) { aFunction(); } However, this is a trivial case of detecting leaks... You should learn to use ...


1

You have to autorelease the call to scaledImage. autoreleasepool { previewImage = scaledImage(originalImage: originalImage, scaledToSize: desiredSize) }


1

This might be it: for(i = 0; i < hash->numValid - 1; i++) { If you have numValid set to 0 at start, I'm presuming that you increment it each time you add an entry to the array. So if numValid is 1, then you will never loop, which means you will leak one of your entries. It seems that each time you free the hash, you will leak one entry, unless the ...


1

This may not fix your problem, but .. There is a mismatch between the number of allocations and deallocations for freq->fileNames. Allocation: else { freq->fileNames[j] = calloc(strlen(argv[i]) + 1 ,sizeof(char)); strcpy(freq->fileNames[j], argv[i]); j++; freq->numFiles++; } Deallocation: for(i = 0; i < argc - 1 ; ...


1

From what you show the memory management seems OK and does not seem to leak memory. Am I freeing the space allocated to the pointer old Yes, the code deallocates, frees to memory old points to, which is commonly referred to as the memory being allocated to a pointer. free(*old) wouldn't work, as it wouldn't compile, because you tried to pass a ...


1

Of course there is a memory leak. You allocate the ints in void aFunction() { handler.ptrToInts = new int[20]; } without deallocating the old ints first, like void aFunction() { delete [] handler.ptrToInts; handler.ptrToInts = new int[20]; } would do. Calling aFunction() will lead to "infinite" memory allocations. And your destructor, ...


1

You need only to use: self.dismissViewControllerAnimated(true, completion: {}) The rest of work is doing by ARC To help you during your debug you can add also this code: if let app = UIApplication.sharedApplication().delegate as? AppDelegate, let window = app.window { if let viewControllers = window.rootViewController?.childViewControllers { ...


1

At the moment I've no comment about the ActiveX part (will double check and let you know), but I can suggest something related to the WPF code. This should make the combo items disposable public class DispCombo : ComboBox, IDisposable { public void Dispose() { GC.SuppressFinalize(this); } } public class DispGrid : Grid, IDisposable { ...


1

Before showing the AlertDialog you can check if the Fragment is added to an Activity if (getActivity != null) { // Show dialog } or if (isAdded()) { // Show dialog }



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