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13

No, the pointer did not get copied. The copy constructor of std::string creates a new buffer and copies the data from the buffer of the other string. Edit: the C++ standard used to allow copy-on-write semantics, which would share the pointer (and would require reference counting to go along with it), but this was disallowed starting with C++11. Apparently ...


9

a=b; After this assignment a points to the same location as b ("Secure Coding"). You have lost any reference to the initial location pointed by a, so essentially "Insecure Coding" is garbage that cannot be freed. Another issue is that you are freeing the same pointer twice. After the first free you no longer own that memory. See: What happens when you ...


3

Question 1: Since each new class is being instantiated from within another class, is this a memory leak? No. And I think you are confusing between a few things memory leak and object references not being used. @kindall explains it beautifully in his comment under your question. The best way to understand what is going is to know that the ...


3

The short version: You need to dispose each script engine when you're done with it. A convenient way is to use the using statement: using (var engine = new V8ScriptEngine()) { // do stuff } Longer version: Each V8 instance reserves a large block of address space. These don't show up as used memory, but in a 32-bit process you can run out of address ...


3

In Objective-C, there are many types of leaks that the static analyzer (shift-command-B) can help identify. Beyond simple strong reference cycles, if you're not using ARC with Objective-C, it's extremely easy to leak. And if you're using Core Foundation objects (especially in Objective-C) and aren't careful, you can easily leak. The static analyzer is pretty ...


3

For GCC 4.* There is an internal counter in the string class, to know the number of instances pointing to the buffer. When the counter is turned to 0, the instance has the responsability to free the memory. It's the same behaviour than shared pointer (boost or C++11). Moreover, when the string is modified, then a new buffer is allocated to avoid the ...


3

One way to debug this is to write some code that monitors all memory allocations and all de-allocation. With such monitor code, you'll be able to find "where" the allocated memory is. Since you are using Linux, this may be a place to start: http://www.gnu.org/savannah-checkouts/gnu/libc/manual/html_node/Hooks-for-Malloc.html A first test could be to check ...


3

There are four general cases: If you are using Swift, memory management is done for you across the board, and the only possible way in which you can be responsible for a leak is through a retain cycle. This can happen more easily than you might suppose. Indeed, in my own real life, the hardest cases are those where normal use of Cocoa creates a retain ...


2

As @ozgur, @jtbandes, @Avi, and @Rob explained in the comments, there is no strong reference cycle or leak. Here is an example based upon @Rob's comment that you can run in a Playground: class ClassA { var classB: ClassB? deinit { print("ClassA deallocated") } } class ClassB { deinit { print("ClassB deallocated") } } ...


2

You may want to look at ScalaMeter. In "Learning Concurrent Programming in Scala" there is subchapter about "Performance debugging".


2

In short: As you have different functions used to allocate memory, you'll need to call their counterpart deallocation functions accordingly: malloc(), calloc() and realloc() need to be deallocated with a call to free() X* x = new X(); needs to be deallocated with delete x; X** x = new X[10]; needs to be deallocated with delete[] x; The idiomatic way ...


2

should crash but doesn't This statement should be taken with a grain of salt. C++ has no concept of "must crash". It has a concept of undefined behaviour, which may or may not result in crashes. Even so, your code has no undefined behaviour. c_str's of both instances refer to same place (this I understand, copy constructor copied A bit-by-bit, and ...


2

Your ClassA doesn't implement INotifyPropertyChanged but you are binding to a property in the class MyViewModel, which does! Therefore you should not have memory leaks. For reference: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/micmcd/2008/03/07/avoiding-a-wpf-memory-leak-with-databinding-black-magic/ There is an issue where WPF checks to find things that ...


2

If you don't use ARC then memory leaks are easy to cause. If you alloc/init an object and then don't release it, or have more retains than releases, and then forget about it then the object is leaked. ARC does not memory manage memory that is allocated using malloc/calloc. That's entirely up to you. If you malloc a block of memory, you have to free it when ...


2

Animation slows with each new animation loop @DanielBengtsson, Yes, as you've discovered, use strokeRect. Alternatively, you can add ctx.beginPath before ctx.rect. What's happening is that all previous rects are being redrawn since the last beginPath so you are really drawing hundreds of rects as you animate. // alternative with beginPath so previous ...


2

You have just discovered the concept of demand-zero pages. Let me cite from Windows Internals, 6th edition, part 2 [Amazon Germany], chapter 10, which is about memory management (page 276 in my edition of the book): For many of those items, the commit charge may represent the potential use of storage rather than the actual. For example, a page of ...


1

int** b = (int**)calloc(sizeof(int*) * rows, sizeof(int*)); This is not correct, the first parameter of calloc is "number of elements to allocate". should be int** b = (int**)calloc(rows, sizeof(int*)); /* No need to cast in C */ What is the safe way for creating multidimensional arrays in C and C++ for such scenarios? In C (in order to avoid ...


1

As you said in your comment above, you are wondering why the iPython notebook process doesn't release memory back to the OS. The answer is somewhat complicated, and goes to the heart of how memory is managed in both the OS and in the process. When a process asks for more memory, the OS has to find an appropriately sized chunk to map into the process's ...


1

You have forgotten to invoke the (compiler-generated) setter methods in a few cases: self.message = mess; // in init method self.message = nil; // in dealloc method self.title = nil; // ditto It's crucial that you use the setter/getter methods in non-ARC code.


1

Upgrade Celery, I've just quick scanned master code, they promise max-memory-per-child. Hope it would work with all concurrency models. I haven't tried it yet. Set up process monitoring, send graceful terminate signal to workers above memory threshold. Works for me. Run Celery in control group with limited memory. Works for me.


1

Replace activities with fragment. Activities are heavy and I guess you are keep on craeting new activites on navigation . Before you know things will easily goes out of control and your app will reach OOM threshold. Keep single activity and replace fragments in that. Here is a tutorial about fragment ...


1

I suggest you to read this article about : 1) Managing Your App's Memory. 2) Investigating Your RAM Usage 3) Introduction about Android memor Edit : Try something like this : using Android.Content; using Java.IO; using System; namespace SampleTest.Droid { public class CacheManager { private static long MaxSize = 5242880L; // 5MB ...


1

Ok. The leak is a false report: ==20323== 72,704 bytes in 1 blocks are still reachable in loss record 1 of 1 ==20323== at 0x4C2BBCF: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so) ==20323== by 0x4EC21FF: ??? (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.21) ==20323== by 0x4010609: call_init.part.0 (dl-init.c:72) ==20323== by ...


1

This definitely appears to be somewhat of an edge case that requires special tuning and possibly choosing the garbage collection scheme used. Since you are using Java8, and you know you are loading thousands of temporary classes, you should try to tune and limit the amount of MetaSpace available and tune the frequency of cleanup. Straight from ...


1

I added a function to free your array and checked it with valgrind that there is no memory leak. #include <stdio.h> #include <time.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <memory.h> size_t BUF_LEN = 32; int EXTRA_SPACES = 16; int length = 0; char ** tokenize(const char * s, int * n) { /* Sets array of strings and allocates memory, sized ...


1

I call free(tokens) where appropriate free(tokens); is not enough, you must call free for each allocated item: for (i = 0; i < n; i++) { free(tokens[i]); } free(tokens);



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