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I believe you want java.lang.Object the other class is a utility class with methods for manipulating objects.


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ARC (Automatic Reference Counting) will automatically manage memory so you don't need to worry about memory management. You only need to know some basic stuff like the difference between weak and strong references and you have to make sure you don't create strong reference cycles. But besides these things, you don't need to send retain or release messages to ...


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You can install and create Docker containers, allowing you to run processes in isolation. This will allow you to use multiple containers with the same base and without having to install the JDK multiple times. The advantage of this is separation of concerns- Every application can be deployed in a separate container. With this, you can then profile any ...


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It would help if you posted your code, but keep in mind that every device out there will have different memory constraints and you should be sure you are downsampling your images to an acceptable size. hope this helps: http://developer.android.com/training/displaying-bitmaps/load-bitmap.html


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IF you are sure that all your references are set to null at java side then their might be issue with the Drawables, i am posting a simple solution just put that code in your activity classes and then onDestroy call that code it will freeup all memory taken by drawables. protected void unbindDrawables(View view) { if (view != null) { if ...


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First of al, I highly recommend you to use MAT to profile the content of your heap. http://android-developers.blogspot.be/2011/03/memory-analysis-for-android.html Be sure that you provide drawables in the adequat version and size (mdpi, hdpi, xhpdi...)


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There is no way to do this with Java since the Java runtime has no clear way to say "this is application A and this is B". When you run several applications in one Java VM, you're just running one: JBoss. JBoss then has a very complex classloader but the app you're profiling is actually JBoss. To do what you want to do, you have to apply filters but this ...


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That is really a messy code... First do not use scriplets use servlets. Do not throw that amount of code at as identify your problem and then narrow down your question so we can answer it. You can make use of MAT in eclipse take stack dump and analyze what objects take up most amount of memory and therefore what is a cause of the memory leak. Why are you ...


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You could be free from memory leak and as a bonus avoid the garbage collector. All you got to do is object polling. You could do something like var clientsPool = new Array(1000); var clientsConnected = []; When a new client connects, you do var newClient = clientsPool.pop(); //set your props here clientsConnected.push(newClient); That's an ...


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tl;dr If you use a combination of #1 (unsubscribe on unload) and #3 (weak event listener), then I don't think that your control should be at fault for any memory leaks. There is nothing more you can do. Implementing IDisposable doesn't really help, because no-one wants to call "Dispose" on UI elements, and anyway, in those instances where "Unloaded" isn't ...


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As to my Comment... Javascript can't clear up a section of memory should anything be pointing at it about 2 years ago some one found an exploit and it was quickly closed like that and it works like this var someData = ["THIS IS SOME DATA SAY IT WAS THE SIZE OF A SMALL APPLICATION"]; var somePointer = someData[0]; delete someData; they then injected an ...


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public String serialize(Object contextObject) { Gson jsonifier = JSONIFIER_BUILDER.registerTypeAdapter(Config.class, new ConfigSerializer(contextObject)).create(); return jsonifier.toJson(this); } You keep registering new types to your static builder. Which it apparently does not overwrite the previous one. GsonBuilder source


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Nothing ;) Automatic reference counting automatically handles this for you http://clang.llvm.org/docs/AutomaticReferenceCounting.html Edit: The memory may not be going down for other reasons. Check you don't have any strong reference cycles. To be 100% sure your GenericWebViewController is being cleared from memory, override its dealloc method and make ...


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Disclaimer: I'm not a GHCi expert, and also not that good with GHC core. Now that I've lost my credibility, lets try to understand what happens: GHCi and CAFs GHCi retains all evaluated CAFs: Normally, any evaluation of top-level expressions (otherwise known as CAFs or Constant Applicative Forms) in loaded modules is retained between evaluations. Now ...


0

Valgrind also has a graphical user interface, Valkyrie (http://valgrind.org/downloads/guis.html), to visualize the memory management output. You can use the options valgrind options "--xml=yes --xml-file=.xml" for generating the xml file, and then use valkyrie to display the xml file.


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You are freeing n, but that doesn't point to the beginning of the linked list... Try adjusting the free_node call to: free_node(root);


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You should try free_node(root) because by calling free_node(n) you only delete the nodes after n (in this case only the last one) and in result all the nodes before it will be considered lost for Valgrind because they are not getting deallocated.


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After inspecting the code of writeFile, it seems that it depends on the hPut function of Data.ByteString.Lazy: -- | Outputs a 'ByteString' to the specified 'Handle'. -- hPut :: Handle -> ByteString -> IO () hPut h cs = foldrChunks (\c rest -> S.hPut h c >> rest) (return ()) cs hPut constructs the IO action that will print the lazy ...


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Are you using blkid_put_cache()? For the README of libblkid: If you have called blkid_get_cache(), you should call blkid_put_cache() when you are done using the blkid library functions. This will save the cache to the blkid.tab file, if you have write access to the file. It will also free all associated devices and tags: ...


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Check your variable declarations (weak, strong) to be sure that the topView object hasn't retain somewhere else. Such as IBOutlet's usually declared with a Weak Key: @property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet UIView * topView;


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As much as I understand your question, yes you can use memory allocation hooks to check for memory allocation, in a program. If you meant _HOOK_ALLOC and such ones, then they are available in windows which you can refer here. If you are on linux, you could still use the malloc hooks. Or you can even write your own hooks in kernel or system call level.


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As commented in several places, this looks like a bug in the implementation of SKPhysicsBody, which persists at least until iOS 7.1. The reason for this is: SKPhysicsBody holds an instance variable, '_path', which holds a copy of the initial CGPathRef passed when calling 'bodyWithEdgeChainFromPath' or similiar constructors. This instance variable never gets ...


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Please vote for the issue to be resolved, you will have to login. https://javafx-jira.kenai.com/browse/RT-38058 Java 7 and 8 code calling pagination.setPageFactory(...); pagination.setPageCount(...); will incur this leak. There appears to be a leak in the PaginationSkin class. To verify copy the source from ...


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I'm not sure, but here's a thought. When you call this line: [[self.topView subviews] makeObjectsPerformSelector:@selector(removeFromSuperview)]; It removes all of the subviews which declare self.topView as a superview. The next line: self.topView = nil Doesn't remove the top view itself, but rather nil's your pointer to it. Because views are ...


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Your onDestroy method isn't called when you open a new activity because the only time onDestroy is called is when your system is low on resources such as memory etc. Rather you should use the onStop() method which is called when the activity is "hidden". You can read more about the android lifecycle by clicking here.


1

This is not a memory leak. If you open an Activity A and then an Activity B, the first one will continue in memory until Android needs memory or Android considers that that Activity A potentially won't be open again. Further more, in your case the activity A is playing something which will consume more than an usual activity.


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use a flag like boolean isActibityKilled=true //when in onstop use it in the runnable to check if activity is running or not if activity is not running , or it is stopped then kill your thread


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According to MDN, terminating a worker implies that "[the] worker thread is killed immediately without an opportunity to complete its operations or clean up after itself" (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Guide/Performance/Using_web_workers#Terminating_a_worker), so I guess "killing" a worker isn't a reasonable option ATM if you want your web app ...


1

JavaScript implementations haven't had a problem with circular references for a long time. (IE6 did have a memory leak from circular references if I recall correctly, which wasn't shared by any other major browser from that period.) Modern JavaScript implementations perform garbage collection through a "mark and sweep" algorithm. First they scan through ...


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Ok, the solution its in the link that i posted: import org.apache.commons.logging.Log; import org.apache.commons.logging.LogFactory; public static void doStuff(...) { Log log = LogFactory.getLog("stuff"); log.warn(...); } https://wiki.apache.org/commons/Logging/StaticLog The references to the private static Logger log = ...


1

You have correctly identified a drawback of using pthread_cancel(): any resource not released/freed by the thread cleanup routine will subsequently leak. In your case, it appears that the thread library, itself, might have allocated some memory that isn't being freed. A better approach, IMO, would be to create a mechanism for notifying the threadhandler ...


0

From my recent experience with Groovy template engine in Play framework, Groovy does not clean the Meta Class Registry when its compiled classes are not reachable from application code. https://hoangx281283.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/unload-groovy-classes/


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This is neither a memory leak nor a crash as far as I can tell. Xpressive is throwing an exception because this is an invalid pattern. The following program: #include <iostream> #include <boost/xpressive/xpressive_dynamic.hpp> namespace xpr = boost::xpressive; int main() { const char pattern[] = ...


0

This will not cause any memory leaks because when you return from any loop or method, it ends the process and "returns" out of it. break; works the same way. The only way you would possibly have a data leak is if you were dealing with pointers, and you left the loop without destucting them.


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There is one variable in scope here, i. As this would seem to be part of a method, and therefore allocated on the stack, so when the method returns, the memory is reclaimed. As only a single integer value is involved, I suspect you can cope without that space between the for loop ending and the method exiting.


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No, this will not leak memory.


0

the best way by far to look for memory leaks is use valgrind. As far as I know it only works on linux, but it is well worth the time to investigate and use.


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I would get that information from the operating system by grepping ps aux for the phantom process.


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That perf counter doesn't actually display the number of pinning handles. It displays the number of objects that could not be moved during the last garbage collection. Which is a very different number. For one it is stale of course so your minidump is not necessarily a good match. For another, it also shows pins that don't require a handle. You can't ...


0

C++ does require you to manage the lifetime of objects. It's not nearly as hard as many Java or C# books might lead you to believe. But, yes, without using a garbage collector, you need to be sure that delete gets called appropriately. There are two ways I can imagine doing this for the code you posted. The first is, as others have suggested, to use ...


1

Yes you should always delete any dynamic memory which you allocate. You could implement a simple RAII container to handle your memory cleanup. Just create a class to act as a handle which news the memory in its constructor. deletes it inside its destructor and provides some kind of access mechanism. That way any memory is automatically cleaned up at the end ...


1

In case View is getting destroyed, you need not to worry about unhooking these event handlers. Garbage collection will take care of this. For event handling, memory leak occurs in case Publisher life time is more than it's subscriber (Publisher holds on to the subscriber instance via Invocation list). But, in your case publisher and subscriber are same. ...


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In general, you will indeed need to perform a delete (or delete[] for arrays) once for each allocation with new. If you are on linux, valgrind can help detect memory leaks, by the way. Recent versions of C++, as well as the Boost library, provided various sorts of smart pointers, which basically will free the memory automatically when the object is no ...


0

public static class IImageExtensions { // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/20825497/difference-between-using-and-dispose-call-in-c-sharp public static void FreeMem(this IImage image) { using (image) { using (image.Bitmap) { } } //image.Bitmap.Dispose(); ...


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I found the reason for the problem. Like you, I thought that their "demo code" was supposed to work as is. Not understanding that this line GMSCameraPosition *camera = [GMSCameraPosition cameraWithLatitude:-33.868 longitude:151.2086 ...


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I decided not to use DelegatingDriver as well as DriverManager anymore. Plus I created a subclass of a URLClassLoader to make it possible to add URLs dynamically. Here's my solution: public class Database { private static final class InstanceHolder { static final Database INSTANCE = new Database(); } private static final class ...


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When using Struts2, you should use Actions instead of Servlets whenever it's possible. Actions are Thread-Safe, while Servlets are not; Actions are "surrounded" (intercepted before and after Action execution) by ready-to-use Interceptors, while for Servlets you need to write your own Servlet Filters from scratch. By the way, if for some reason you ...


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You should never rely on GC.Collect() to reclaim the memory. .NET is a managed environment, you give control of memory management to the runtime in exchange for not having to write code that manages it directly, with all the considerations that brings. Calling GC.Collect() simply advises the runtime that it may wish to run a collection cycle when it next ...


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You have a reference to a string, which since it is a constant, is probably interned and will never be collected: string strBook = wr.Target as string; if(strBook != null) { Console.WriteLine("again -> Book is alive"); if(string.IsInterned(strBook) != null) Debug.WriteLine("Because this string is interned"); } else ...


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Perhaps it's because string literals are stored in an internal dictionary to prevent duplication? See here for details: String interning and String.Empty Try allocating a POCO class (e.g. a StringBuilder) instead of a string literal for your test.



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