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34

Unused memory is not actually unused. It is the job of any heap implementation to keep track of holes in the heap. At a minimum, the manager needs to know the size of the hole and needs to keep track of their location. That always costs at least 8 bytes. In .NET, System.Object plays a key role. Everybody knows what it does, what isn't so obvious that it ...


20

I was looking for an answer to your question since I found it a very interesting question. I found this answer which has an interesting first line: You can't free part of an array - you can only free() a pointer that you got from malloc() and when you do that, you'll free all of the allocation you asked for. So actually the problem is the register that ...


16

To answer your question it has to do with the design of the memory management system. In theory if you were writing your own memory system you could totally design it to behave exactly the way you said. The question then becomes why wasn't it designed that way. The answer is that the memory management system made a trade off between efficient use of memory ...


6

I think this is because the old array is not destroyed. It is still there if it is being referenced somewhere else and it still can be accessed. This is why the new array is created in a new memory location. Example: int[] original = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 }; int[] otherReference = original; // currently points to the same object Array.Resize(ref ...


6

There is a great deal of misinformation on this topic floating around the internet, so read critically. I noticed that unlike C++, C# requires me to instantiate an object on the heap before using its member functions or variables. This is the wrong way to think about it in C#. Don't think of "new" as "the thing that makes storage on the heap". Think ...


5

Your problem is surely caused by virtual address space exhausting. Probably your problem reproduces on 32-bit Android devices, where available to user address space is physically limited to 2GB and cannot be bumped. (Although it may be 3GB (unlikely so) and it is configured during OS build process). Probably ~500 MB is used for system libraries, JVM and its ...


5

If you look at the relevant isocpp paper you can see that the first set you mention is now thought to be better placed in std::allocator_traits. Since the STL (not even standard library) came out, there's been more of a shift to use traits. rebind is also a relic. When the STL first came out, aliases and template-template parameters were not supported. With ...


4

Only the designers of the .NET runtime can tell you their actual reasoning. But my guess is that memory safety is paramount in .NET, and it would be very expensive to maintain both memory safety and mutable array lengths, not to mention how much complicated any code with arrays would be. Consider the simple case: var fun = 0; for (var i = 0; i < array....


4

Does "const" ensure that struct abc,abc->xyz always gets stored in some read-only segment in memory, and hence safe from any memory corruption ? No, not always. With const, diagnostics (warnings/errors) at compile time emit if code knowingly attempts to modify the variable. If an attempt is made to modify an object defined with a const-qualified type ...


4

You are not joining sub processes. After list_of_values done processes created by Pool still alive (kinda, more like zombie, but with alive parent process). They still hold all their values. You can't see their data in main because it in another processes (for same reason gc.collect not working). To free memory allocated by workers you need to manually ...


4

Every memory allocation has to be tracked so that free() can release the space for reuse. In practice, that means there's a minimum memory size that's allocated; it can be 8 or 16 bytes for a 32-bit program and 16-32 bytes for a 64-bit program (it depends on the system and the version of the C library in use). When you allocate the one million integers ...


4

TL;DR No, it's not allowed. In your case, when you got a valid non-NULL pointer to a memory address returned by malloc(), only the requested size of memory is allocated to your process and you're allowed to use (read and / or write) into that much space only. In general, any allocated memory (compile-time or run-time) has an associated size with it. ...


4

This is the sync.Pool implementation mentioned by @JimB. Mind the usage of defer to return object to pool. package main import "sync" type Something struct { Name string } var pool = sync.Pool{ New: func() interface{} { return &Something{} }, } func main() { s := pool.Get().(*Something) defer pool.Put(s) s.Name = "...


4

There are two reasons for the definition of realloc as it is: First, it makes it absolutely clear that there is no guarantee that calling realloc with a smaller size will return the same pointer. If your program makes that assumption, your program is broken. Even if the pointer is the same 99.99% of the time. If there is a large block right smack in the ...


4

Once you delete an object it is available to garbage collected rather than deleted immediately - so just give it some time and it will free up or trigger a gc.collect() to speed things up. python.exe Python 3.5.1 (v3.5.1:37a07cee5969, Dec 6 2015, 01:38:48) [MSC v.1900 32 bit (Intel)] on win32 Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more ...


3

What you are looking for is struct packing, which is platform and compiler dependent, the details are not specified in the C standard. With GCC, on a 32-bit platform, you could do the following to get a struct of size 2: typedef struct __attribute__((__packed__)) { unsigned char msg_id; unsigned char msg_num; } Message_Header_Type; From the GCC ...


3

This error states you trying to access protected memory. Most likely you pass array lesser size then your image required. It's similar to buffer overflow. So when GDI tries to read memory with your image it goes beyond allocated for you process memory and fail occur. By the way, behavior is undefined. For example, if that piece of memory already allocated to ...


3

Welcome to the complex world of C! Basically, you're overwriting your pointer test with an address of "Hello!" (which is static immutable array). And it crashes because you try to free a thing that you have not created. You should use strcpy() or a loop to copy your string into text.


3

As in the comments, this is what going on: int main(void) { char* test = malloc(1024); /* You allocate, great! */ test = "Hello!"; /* Huh, what's this? You point 'test' * to some area in the code section. * Valid, but considering you just ...


2

Registering an event listener all by itself does not keep it from being garbage collected. Something has to actually have a reference to the Bot object itself (so that events could actually be emitted from it) for it to not be garbage collected. In your Controller class, if nothing else has a reference to the Bot instance you create, then it will be ...


2

Having run into this problem many times myself, I wrote up a small function (inspired by @aaron-hall's answer) & tests that does what I would have expected sys.getsizeof to do: https://github.com/bosswissam/pysize If you're interested in the backstory, here it is EDIT: Attaching the code below for easy reference. To see the most up-to-date code, ...


2

There might be many sophisticated data-structures operating "under the hood" in any heap-management system. They might, for instance, store blocks according to their present size. It would add a lot of complications if blocks were allowed to "be split, grow, and shrink." (And, it really wouldn't make things any 'faster.') Therefore, the implementation does ...


2

Note beforehand: Many suggest to use sync.Pool which is a fast, good implementation for temporary objects. But note that sync.Pool does not guarantee that pooled objects are retained. Quoting from its doc: Any item stored in the Pool may be removed automatically at any time without notification. If the Pool holds the only reference when this happens, ...


2

The system needs to do some housekeeping every time a user asks for some memory. That's should come in mind when just calling free with just your pointer suffices for the system to de-allocate its memory. So, in your first example, you request memory n times, while on the second just once. The memory that you intend to use is the same, but the information ...


2

Message_Header_type inside of Raw_Message_Type is still taking 2 bytes as you would expect, but the compiler is padding the structure for alignment reasons, so your Raw_Message_Type is 132 bytes long instead of the 130 bytes you expected. This is probably because 32-bit aligned accesses are more efficient on your processor. If you are using gcc, you can ...


2

As I noted in the comments, Why do you need to free anything? When you merge the two lists, each item in each of the lists should be in the result list, so none of the items should be freed. Since you have a 'list head' structure (struct llist), you have to set the two old list head structures passed into llmrg() so they don't point to anything any ...


2

Say, I allocate some dynamic memory using malloc() function call in a c program and subtract some positive value(say 1000) from the address returned by it. Now, I try to read what is written on that location which should be fine but what about writing to that location? What addresses you can read/write/execute from are based on a processes current memory ...


2

Processes in OS have their own virtual address spaces. Say, I allocate some dynamic memory using malloc() function call in a c program and subtract some positive value(say 1000) from the address returned by it. Now, I try to read what is written on that location which should be fine but what about writing to that location? No, it should not be ...


2

You cannot use said MemoryPool as an allocator for std::vector, since it is intended for fixed-size allocations: A memory pool has just a few disadvantages: Objects have a fixed size which must be known beforehand. This is usually not a problem and mostly the case if you need to allocate them in a bunch. Also see the comment above the ...


2

There is no need for a name at runtime. The name is only necessary for you and the C compiler. The C compiler knows to which file it belongs, the file where it's defined. That's enough information. Both variables are stored in the .bss section with their respective name, but at different memory locations. That's how their distinction is made. You can ...



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