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1226

First, you have to learn to think like a Language Lawyer. The C++ specification does not make reference to any particular compiler, operating system, or CPU. It makes reference to an abstract machine that is a generalization of actual systems. In the Language Lawyer world, the job of the programmer is to write code for the abstract machine; the job of the ...


158

I will just give the analogy with which I understand memory consistency models (or memory models, for short). It is inspired by Leslie Lamport's seminal paper "Time, Clocks, and the Ordering of Events in a Distributed System". The analogy is apt and has fundamental significance, but may be overkill for many people. However, I hope it provides a mental image ...


55

What it means is that the Standard now defines multi-threading, it defines what happens in the context of multiple threads. Of course, people used varying implementations, but that's like asking why we should have a std::string when we could all be using a home-rolled string class. When you're talking about POSIX threads or Windows threads, then this is a ...


54

As of 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich), Dalvik's behavior should match up with JSR-133 (the Java Memory Model). As of 3.0 (Honeycomb), most of the pieces were in place, but some minor things had been overlooked that would be difficult to encounter in practice (e.g. some edge cases in finalization). As of 2.3 (Gingerbread), Dalvik was generally correct on ...


42

See JLS section 17.7: Non-atomic Treatment of double and long Some implementations may find it convenient to divide a single write action on a 64-bit long or double value into two write actions on adjacent 32 bit values. For efficiency's sake, this behavior is implementation specific; Java virtual machines are free to perform writes to ...


40

Lockfree programming is about progress guarantees: From strongest to weakest, those are wait-free, lock-free, obstruction-free, and blocking. A guarantee is expensive and comes at a price. The more guarantees you want, the more you pay. Generally, a blocking algorithm or datastructure (with a mutex, say) has the greatest liberties, and thus is potentially ...


36

[[carries_dependency]] is used to allow dependencies to be carried across function calls. This potentially allows the compiler to generate better code when used with std::memory_order_consume for transferring values between threads on platforms with weakly-ordered architectures such as IBM's POWER architecture. In particular, if a value read with ...


36

For languages not specifying a memory model, you are writing code for the language and the memory model specified by the processor architecture. The processor may choose to re-order memory accesses for performance. So, if your program has data races (a data race is when its possible for multiple cores / hyper-threads to access the same memory concurrently) ...


34

The purpose of memory_order_consume is to ensure the compiler does not do certain unfortunate optimizations that may break lockless algorithms. For example, consider this code: int t; volatile int a, b; t = *x; a = t; b = t; A conforming compiler may transform this into: a = *x; b = *x; Thus, a may not equal b. It may also do: t2 = *x; // use t2 ...


33

The C++ memory model is the specification of when and why physical memory is read/written with respect to C++ code. Until the next C++ standard, the C++ memory model is the same as C. In the C++0x standard, a proper memory model for multithreading is expected to be included (see here), and it will be part possibly of the next revision of the C standard, ...


28

This is now a 2-year old question, but being very popular, it's worth mentioning a fantastic resource for learning about the C++11 memory model. I see no point in summing up his talk in order to make this yet another full answer, but given this is the guy who actually wrote the standard, I think it's well worth watching the talk. Herb Sutter has a 3 hour ...


24

No one here has provided a correct/safe implementation of this algorithm in Java. I'm not sure how John W's solution is supposed to work since it's got pieces missing (namely the declarations of the ThreadLocals and an explanation of what is supposed to be in his array—primitive booleans don't have get() and set()). Chapter 17 of the Java Language ...


23

I don't care when exactly m_Done will be set to true. My question is do I have a guarantee by the C# language specification and the Task parallel library that eventually m_Done will be true if I'm accessing it from a different thread? No. The read of m_Done is non-volatile and may therefore be moved arbitrarily far backwards in time, and the result may ...


22

Seeing some other answers, it seems many C++ programmers are not even aware what the "memory model" you are asking about means. The questions is about memory model in the sense: what guarantees (if any) are there about write / read reordering (which may happen on the compiler side or on the runtime side)? This question is very important for multithreaded ...


22

It's safe. Quoting C++11: [intro.memory]p3: A memory location is either an object of scalar type or a maximal sequence of adjacent bit-fields all having non-zero width. [ Note: Various features of the language, such as references and virtual functions, might involve additional memory locations that are not accessible to programs but are managed by the ...


18

Any x86 instruction that has lock prefix has full memory barrier. As shown Abel's answer, Interlocked* APIs and CompareExchanges use lock-prefixed instruction such as lock cmpxchg. So, it implies memory fence. Yes, Interlocked.CompareExchange uses a memory barrier. Why? Because x86 processors did so. From Intel's Volume 3A: System Programming Guide Part 1, ...


17

The Java memory model was an important influence on the C++11 memory model, and was where we pulled the terms happens-before and synchronizes-with from. However, the C++11 memory model offers much more fine-grained control over memory ordering than the Java memory model. Java volatile variables are equivalent to C++11 std::atomic<> variables, if you ...


17

The spinlock mutex implementation looks okay to me. I think they got the definitions of acquire and release completely wrong. Here is the clearest explanation of acquire/release consistency models that I am aware of: Gharachorloo; Lenoski; Laudon; Gibbons; Gupta; Hennessy: Memory consistency and event ordering in scalable shared-memory multiprocessors, ...


16

I thought that until recently. Volatile reads aren't what you think they are - they're not about guaranteeing that they get the most recent value; they're about making sure that no read which is later in the program code is moved to before this read. That's what the spec guarantees - and likewise for volatile writes, it guarantees that no earlier write is ...


16

Yes, because we can not observe the difference! An implementation is allowed to turn your snippet into the following (pseudo-implementation). int __loaded_foo = foo; int x = __loaded_foo; int y = __loaded_foo; The reason is that there is no way for you to observe the difference between the above, and two separate loads of foo given the guarantees of ...


15

The just::thread library has decent documentation and was developed by Anthony Williams, author of C++ Concurrency in Action and maintainer of the Boost thread library.


15

If you use mutexes to protect all your data, you really shouldn't need to worry. Mutexes have always provided sufficient ordering and visibility guarantees. Now, if you used atomics, or lock-free algorithms, you need to think about the memory model. The memory model describes precisely when atomics provide ordering and visibility guarantees, and provides ...


14

The semantics of "volatile" in C# are defined in sections 3.10 and 10.4.3 of the specification. Rather than reproduce them here, I encourage you to look it up in the spec, and then decide that it is too complicated and dangerous to use "volatile", and go back to using locks. That's what I always do. See 3.10 Execution Order and 10.4.3 Volatile Fields ...


14

One of the issues is the definition of "memory location", that allows (and forces the compiler to support) locking different structure members by different locks. There is a discussion about a RL problem caused by this. Basically the issue is that having a struct defined like this: struct x { long a; unsigned int b1; unsigned int b2:1; }; the ...


14

// start with x==0 and y==0 if (x) y = 1; // thread 1 if (y) x = 1; // thread 2 Since neither x nor y is true, the other won't be set to true either. No matter the order the instructions are executed, the (correct) result is always x remains 0, y remains 0.


13

In terms of concurrency, a memory model specifies the constraints on data accesses, and the conditions under which data written by one thread/core/processor becomes visible to another. The terms weak and strong are somewhat ambiguous, but the basic premise is that a strong memory model places a lot of constraints on the hardware to ensure that writes by one ...


12

Short answer: no. However, I am not aware of any situation in which the conservative approach of the compiler will change the number of reads or writes if you follow this approach: When reading a cross-thread visible location, save its value to a local before doing any further manipulation; similarly, restrict writes to a single assignment. The Delphi ...


12

No, it just removes const attribute at compile time.


12

There is a document in the Dalvik source which says: From the point of view of a piece of code written in the Java programming language or targeted in the same way to .class files, the Dalvik VM aims to behave in a way that is fully consistent with the language's definition. That is, the code running in Dalvik will behave the same as it would have ...



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