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30

.NET applications will have a bigger footprint compared to native applications due to the fact that they both have to load the runtime and the application in the process. If you want something really tidy, .NET may not be the best option. However, keep in mind that if you application is mostly sleeping, the necessary memory pages will be swapped out of ...


27

In C, an "int" is defined as the most efficient integer type for the current machine. It usually match the registers of the CPU, that's how it is the most eficient. Using a smaller type of integer value may result in some bit-shifting or bit masking at the CPU level so you would get no gain...


25

You might want to check out Stack Overflow question .NET EXE memory footprint. The MSDN blog post Working set != actual memory footprint is all about demystifying the working set, process memory and how to perform accurate calculations on your total in-RAM consumption. I will not say that you should ignore the memory footprint of your application -- ...


13

One thing you need to consider in this case is the memory cost of the CLR. The CLR is loaded for every .Net process and hence factors into the memory considerations. For such a simple / small program the cost of the CLR is going to dominate your memory footprint. It would be much more instructive to construct a real application and view the cost of that ...


11

With the first variant you reallocate the vector's buffer on each iteration – that's usually quite costly. With the second variant you only reallocate occasionally. The second variant is better since speed is a priority for you. It's unclear from you question where the number of elements is know from. Maybe you even can quickly calculate the maximum number ...


10

I think what you need is BitArray class


8

Accessing an integer size that is the same size as the native word size is going to be the most efficient. Using a byte will almost certainly require as much space as the native word size and require shifting and masking to access, so there is nothing to gain. In practical terms, unless you have a very, very large loop or severe timing restrictions, it ...


7

No specific suggestions per se, but you might take a look at the CLR Profiler (free download from Microsoft). Once you've installed it, take a look at this how-to page. From the how-to: This How To shows you how to use the CLR Profiler tool to investigate your application's memory allocation profile. You can use CLR Profiler to identify code ...


7

I almost always use int unless there is a very good reason not to, just because everyone always uses it. This is to avoid the next developer having to spend time thinking Why didn't he use an int here, is there some special reason I need to know about. The more standard my code is, the easier it is to read in the future.


7

It does not work like that. The number of blocks which will be scheduled to run at any given moment on a single SM will always be the minimum of the following: 8 blocks The number of blocks whose sum of static and dynamically allocated shared memory is less than 16kb or 48kb, depending on GPU architecture and settings. There is also shared memory page size ...


6

Might want to look at the memory usage of a "real" application. Similar to Java there is some fixed amount of overhead for the runtime regardless of the program size, but memory consumption will be much more reasonable after that point.


6

You could use the IIBtree from Zope


6

In many cases, the loop counter consumes exactly one processor register. Changing the type to an 8- or 16-bit integer doesn't change that, as the registers have fixed size (32 bits on a 32-bit platform, etc.). Sometimes, the loop counter may be placed in RAM, e.g. when you are calling a function from the loop. Then, yes, you may be wasting a few bytes, but ...


5

If every single word you can squeeze out of the storage is critical, then I have to recommend optimizing the struct by hand. A tool could arrange the members optimally for you, but it doesn't know, for example, that this value here that you're storing in 16 bits actually never goes above 1024, so you could steal the upper 6 bits for this value over here... ...


5

The second one could be slightly faster, but I find the first one cleaner.


5

I forsee that predicting vector sizes and reserving enough memory for the vectors in advance will help me a lot with reducing memory usage. Try and act like an engineer not a fortune teller. Create a test, and measure the difference.


5

There is a Perl script called pstruct that is usually included with Perl installations. The script will dump out structure member offsets and sizes. You could either modify pstruct or use its output as a starting point for making a utility that packs your structures the way you want. $ cat foo.h struct foo { int x; char y; int b[5]; char ...


5

I don't know if this is a one-shot solution, or part of an ongoing project, but if it's the former, is throwing more ram at it cheaper than the necessary developer time to optimize the memory usage? Even at 64 bytes per pair, you're still only looking at 15GB, which would fit easily enough into most desktop boxes. I think the correct answer probably lies ...


5

Use a reference to the variable in the foreach loop using the & operator. This avoids making a copy of the array in memory for foreach to iterate over. edit: as pointed out by Artefacto unsetting the variable only decreases the number of references to the original variable, so the memory saved is only on pointers rather than the value of the variable. ...


4

In terms of the Java Language Specification there is an interesting point to note about the use of long and double: For the purposes of the Java programming language memory model, a single write to a non-volatile long or double value is treated as two separate writes: one to each 32-bit half. This can result in a situation where a thread sees ...


4

8 bytes per key/value pair would be pretty difficult under any implementation, Python or otherwise. If you don't have a guarantee that the keys are contiguous then either you'd waste a lot of space between the keys by using an array representation (as well as needing some sort of dead value to indicate a null key), or you'd need to maintain a separate index ...


4

This obviously isn't the fastest solution, but have you tried: m, inner = input_array.shape n = 300 out = np.empty((m, n)) for i in xrange(n): out[:, i] = np.dot(input_array, np.random.normal(size=inner))


4

Since you know for a fact that you're dealing with 16-bit values, any lookup algorithm will be a constant-time algorithm, since there are only O(1) different possible values. Consequently, algorithms that on the surface might be slower (for example, linear search, which runs in O(n) for n elements) might actually be useful here. Barring a perfect hashing ...


4

The guy seems to be confused about the StructLayoutAttribute that can be applied to C# structs. It allows you to specify how the struct's memory is laid out, and you can, in fact, create a struct that has fields of varying types that all start at the same memory address. The part he seems to have missed is that you're going to only use one of those fields ...


3

The paper B-tries for disk-based string management answers your question. It makes the observation: To our knowledge, there has yet to be a proposal in literature for a trie-based data structure, such as the burst trie, the can reside efficiently on disk to support common string processing tasks.


3

I've only glanced at it briefly, but Shang's "Trie methods for text and spatial data on secondary storage" discusses paged trie representations, and might be a useful starting point.


3

There are still ways to reduce the private working set of this simple program: NGEN your application. This removes JIT compilation cost from your process. Train your application using MPGO reducing memory usage and then NGEN it.


2

Most C compilers won't do this based on the fact that you can do weird stuff (like taking the address of an element in the struct and then use pointer magic to access the rest, bypassing the compiler). A famous example are the double linked lists in the AmigaOS which used guardian nodes as head and tail of the list (this makes it possible to avoid ifs when ...



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