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13

Memory warning can be produced by calling an private method of UIApplication. It works fine on iOS 6.1 and below [[UIApplication sharedApplication]performSelector:@selector(_performMemoryWarning)]; NOTE: Remove that selector call before submitting app to iTunes, otherwise it will be rejected.


13

You can manually simulate in the simulator: Hardware -> Simulate Memory Warning You can also simulate it programmatically: - (void)simulateMemoryWarning { #if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR #ifdef DEBUG CFNotificationCenterPostNotification(CFNotificationCenterGetDarwinNotifyCenter(), (CFStringRef)@"UISimulatedMemoryWarningNotification", NULL, NULL, ...


7

Here's a great little class written by Heinz Kabutz that works flawlessly for me "out of the box". Found it in an old "Java specialists" issue: http://www.javaspecialists.eu/archive/Issue092.html import java.lang.management.ManagementFactory; import java.lang.management.MemoryMXBean; import java.lang.management.MemoryNotificationInfo; import ...


6

Well, found a solution I guess..doing various tests I've found out that probably connections were caching something. So I've set the NSURLCache 0byte. My application now seems to run with a very few dirty memory, almost a half. A big improvements. Here are the amazing two lines of code. [[NSURLCache sharedURLCache] setMemoryCapacity:0]; [[NSURLCache ...


5

I don't think it is officially documented by Apple, mainly because it may change between iOS versions, but these are the figures stated in the "Learn iPhone and iPad cocos2d Game Development" book: +-----------------------------------------------------------------+ | Installed Memory | Available Memory | Memory Warning Threshold | ...


4

Every view that you have allocated will take up significant memory. The way to avoid using tons of memory when you have a lot of views on screen (or off screen in a scrollview) is to have a pool of views that you reuse, only having a few more than are on screen at any time. Bad news: This caching and swapping is pretty complicated to set up. Good news: ...


4

After clicking images store images into Document directory. It is most safe option to store images and then use it. Find some tutorial and after click image send image to document directory and then fetch from directory and use it. Hope it helps you.


4

Replace this line UIImage* image = [[UIImage alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:imagePath]; with this and check once UIImage *image = [UIImage imageWithContentsOfFile:imagePath];


4

I didnt find a good solution but I would not store the raw image in a property because the raw image takes up roughly 30MB of memory. So instead of: self.image = [info objectForKey:UIImagePickerControllerOriginalImage]; I changed it to: UIImage * image = [info objectForKey:UIImagePickerControllerOriginalImage]; This way the image is destroyed when it ...


3

From practice and memory... iPad 1 will trigger a level 1 at around 16Mb and probably go to level 2 at about 32mb. iPad 2/3/mini seem to be OK up to about 50Mb to 64Mb. iPad 4 I've not really got conclusive results but from the specs i'd anticipate up to about 100-128Mb before things start to complain. This is what I've observed in instruments at least ...


3

Core Data is designed to give you good tools to be memory friendly but much of it is not automatic. You still need to do some work. General guidelines are a bit tough as different situations might require some very different optimizations. That said, a few notes: Not specific to Core Data but if you need to manipulate a ton of temporary objects (i.e. if ...


3

You need to use NSAutoreleasePools around your image creation code, something like this: void PerformLoadImageTask(CancellationToken token) { if (token.IsCancellationRequested) { Console.WriteLine("Task {0}: Cancelling", Task.CurrentId); return; } using (var pool = new NSAutoreleasePool ()) { current_uiimage_A = ...


3

If you want to avoid memory problems, you should not load them all at once, only when they are needed. To accomplish this, you could just follow the example provided by apple, here. Basically, what you do is load only three images: the one that is showing right now and the ones that are placed to the right and to the left. Then, when you scroll, let's say ...


3

You have very little control of the memory usage of UIWebView objects. You also have very little control of the overall system memory usage. So there is no way to avoid memory warnings. iOS expects your apps to behave properly when receiving memory warnings, so your viewDidLoad method should be written to handle rerunning after a memory warning. The only ...


3

First check in .h file that you property-sythesized with retain or not if with retain then set strong instead of retain like bellow.. @property ( nonatomic, strong) IBOutlet UITextField *yourTextField;;


3

All memory capacity shared through all apps&processes run in iOS. So, other apps can use a lot of memory and your app receive memory warning too. You'll receive memory warnings until it is not enough. To understand what actually happens with memory in your app you should Profile your app with Leaks (ARC is not guarantee that you don't have leaks, i.e. ...


2

If you need all the stuff that you have in memory to be there, just ignore the memory warning (especially the level 1 warning comes quite easily). If you don't need all of it there and can later reload or recreate what you don't need now, remove it from memory until needed (and then reload or recreate it).


2

You can use heap shot analysis (using Instruments) to monitor the memory deltas down to allocation backtrace detail -- that should give you a good enough idea of what is growing and why. Those allocations often indicate what you should have also destroyed during the period. Also be sure there are no leaks in your program.


2

I had problems with UIImage.FromFile. My app is loading a lot of png images using a task, and showing it in the main thread. I added a GC.Collect in the background task, but it hasn't fixed the problem. I had to remove the background task, do all the stuff in the main thread AND call GC.Collect. It seems that Image.Dispose is not releasing the image memory ...


2

Even if you prepare it on other threads it will not solve this issue, what you have to do is to prepare your self for when you recieve a memory warning to act upon it and free some memory that you dont need Try to free some memory up, optimize your application memory consumption, using lazy loading technique and so on, but using another thread is definitely ...


2

I raised this issue with Apple technical support. Their reply was as follows: A search of radar shows that this is a known problem in iOS 5.1 and that engineering is aware of it. At the moment there does not seem to be a workaround for this problem other than making sure that you don't get memory warnings. If you'd like you can file an ...


2

Not all memory "loss" is caused by a leak. Use Heapshot. Use instruments to check for leaks and memory loss due to retained but not leaked memory. The latter is unused memory that is still pointed to. Use Heapshot in the Allocations instrument on Instruments. For HowTo use Heapshot to find memory creap, see: bbum blog Basically there method is to run ...


2

First, as noted before, use ARC. There is no single thing you could do that will more improve memory management. Whether you use ARC or not, you should always use accessors to access your ivars (except in init and dealloc). As noted by @LombaX, you're setting your ivars incorrectly in viewDidLoad. Using accessors would help this. You should run the static ...


2

Don't store Images to Array, that's not a good practice. As the number of images or size of images increase it'll throw memory warnings and crash. Alternatives: Store image names in array Store file path in array Store image url in array and use Async methods to load the image to your UITableView or UICollectionView


1

First: you have a possible and visible leak, but I'm not sure if it is the same leak you have found in instruments: These two lines are in your viewDidLoad method _carouselItems = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:1]; _categorymAr = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:1]; But: viewDidLoad: is called every time the view is loaded ...


1

I just used [sharedCache removeAllCachedResponses]; in conjunction with an autorelease pool....and my cfdata(store) didnt increase beyond 15 MB although i downloaded 4k images.


1

Can you post the definition of InnerScrollView? The most likely problem is that your delegate property is retain, which is keeping your innerScrollViewObj from being deallocated. So, I assume you have something like: @property (nonatomic, retain) id delegate; Which should be: @property (nonatomic) id delegate; Or, if you enable ARC it should be: ...


1

The method that Instruments shows you is the place where the leaked memory is allocated -- not necessarily the place where the memory is leaked. Indeed your method is correct as to memory management. Thus, you better inspect how you handle the returned UIImage object... possibly, if this hint does not help you finding the leak cause, post some more code.


1

Suggestions to remove memory leaks: 1) Use iOS5 feature of ARC. 2) Further checkout the memory leaks in your project using this Hope this helps


1

Is refreshView getting called after the memory warning? Try removing the code that sets the views to nil in viewDidUnload? Does it solve the problem?



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