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26

Your code is fine, but for lots of variables, I'd prefer: int foo() { char *p = NULL; char *q = NULL; int ret = 0; if (NULL == (p = malloc(BUFSIZ))) { ret = ERROR_CODE; goto error; } // possibly do something here if (NULL == (q = malloc(BUFSIZ))) { ret = ERROR_CODE; goto error; } ...


21

Since it is perfectly OK to pass NULL to free(), you could allocate everything that you need in a "straight line", check everything in a single shot, and then free everything once you are done, regardless of whether or not you have actually done any work: char *p = malloc(BUFSIZ); char *q = malloc(BUFSIZ); char *r = malloc(BUFSIZ); if (p && q ...


12

In the second case your memory usage is not coming from storing the list but from building up unevaluated thunks from the use of succ x. succ is lazy, so calling succ x just allocates a new thunk on the heap. This thunk never gets evaluated because you never need to know the value of any of the list elements. In the third case you are forcing the ...


10

Since char is a primitive type, an array of chars will store those bytes directly in the array with no per-character overhead at all. By contrast, String is an object, so the array will store pointers to String instances elsewhere in the heap, each of which has its own overhead of vtable, length, & other information (including a separate reference to a ...


8

There is already multiple memory regions, but only one Java heap as such. Typically there are; Java heap which might be broken into Eden space, Survivor Spaces, Tenures space. The native memory heap for small direct memory allocation. e.g. ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(4) See missing [heap] section in /proc/pid/maps for an interesting discussion of the ...


8

Store all those array's 1st element's addresses (i.e, pointers to first elements of arrays) in another array, defining an "array of pointers", called pv: void * pv[] = { P1, P2, P3, ..., Pn, NULL }; then loop over this array's elements. size_t i = 0; while (NULL != pv[i]) { function(pv[i]); ++i; } However be aware, you'll lose the size of the ...


8

MSalters was right, and I can't read! The answer is very simple. To me, the growth seems linear. You picked VecSize that increase exponentially. You should expect MemUsage to increase exponentially as well! (in the large n limit-- small size optimizations likely exist, as evidenced by the near constant usage for small n...) I did a linear regression on ...


7

There is no way to erase less than the minimum erasable sector size in flash. However, there is a typical way to handle invalidating small structures on a large flash sector. Simply add a header to indicate the state of the data in that structure location. Simple example: 0xffff Structure is erased and available for use. 0xa5a5 Structure contains data ...


7

In f2(), lolo is uninitialized. It's content is hence undefined. Most often however, the content appears to be the data that was on the stack. By coincidence, you've first called func1(), which has exactly the same memory/stack layout than f2(). So by chance the variable contains the data that was previously stored at the same place. This behavior is ...


6

Why is q smaller than p? I would expect memory to be assigned in ascending order, but q < p. I'm not sure why you'd expect that. What possible difference could it make? Why do addresses rarely change? I ran a similar program a few hours ago, and I remember the address being 0x28fef4 that time too. Apparently your platform doesn't randomize ...


6

You lack a level of indirection, you need char**. Excuse the bad formatting, I write from my phone. Char* array, array is bound to a memory slot (that will contain a value that points to another memory slot that would be interpreted as a char). So you copy that value to the function and modify that value locally in allocate, but the modification never ...


6

It doesn't matter whether the enum can go up to 1000; your array does not have 1000 elements. There is no 1000th eye colour to print out. Here's the testcase you should have constructed: #include <iostream> const char* EYE_COLOR_NAMES[] = { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e" }; const int eyes = 1000; int main() { std::cout << EYE_COLOR_NAMES[eyes] ...


6

Assuming an 8-byte pointer size and alignment requirement on long long and pointers, then: 3 bytes for c1 5 bytes padding 8 bytes for k 1 byte   for c2 7 bytes padding 8 bytes for pt 1 byte   for c3 7 bytes padding That adds up to 40 bytes. The trailing padding is allocated so that arrays of the structure keep all the elements of the structure ...


5

You misinterpret the bytes. On a little-endian machine, the value 0x0031A538 is represented with the sequence of bytes 38 A5 31 00. So, your highlights are shifted. Actually you have four addresses here: 0x00319D00, 0x0031A538, 0x0031A550 and again 0x0031A550. A vector minimally needs three values to control its data, one of them being, obviously, the ...


5

What happens is that the class's assignment operator is called. In most cases that just means that the contents of the old object are updated with values from the new object. So if ClassName is: struct ClassName { int a; int b; ClassName(int a, int b) : a(a), b(b) {} }; In this case the default assignment operator would be called which ...


5

In your case, the best option is to use an STL vector. #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; vector<double> v; int main() { v.push_back(3.0); // Add an item v.push_back(5.0); v.push_back(7.0); v.push_back(8.0); cout << "v[0]: " << v[0] << endl; // Access an item cout ...


5

It's not unusual for platforms to have limitations on stack size. On every modern platform you are likely to use, a process' address space ceases to exist as soon as it terminates. So there's no need to do anything about leaks of allocated address space, backed or unbacked, across process termination. The address space ceases to exist because it belongs to ...


5

Can they really be altered at run time? Yes. Unless you declare them as const, of course. I was under the impression that a static and/or global variable remained immutable throughout an application, I thought this was the point of their existence. No, you're describing constants. Variables with so-called static storage duration have, how the ...


5

Dynamic memory allocation in C sits on the blurry line between abstract mathematics and real-world engineering. Mathematically you say, "put this data in some memory", and indeed malloc() just gives you "some memory", basically pretending that there is an unbounded amount of memory. (And on many real-world systems malloc() does in fact never fail, due to ...


4

It depends on whether you need to search the data structure based on the key alone or both the key and the value. If you search by the key alone (i.e. map.containsKey(key)), you should use a HashMap. If you search for existence of a key-value pair (i.e. set.contains(new Pair(key,value)), you should use a HashSet that contains those pairs. Another thing ...


4

"What exactly does that line of C-code do?" Waste a lot of time having to carefully read it instead just knowing at a glance. If I was doing code review of that, I'd throw it back to the author and say break it up into two lines. The two things it does is save something at e->output, then advance e->output to the next byte. I think if you need to describe ...


4

From [except.throw]/15.1/4: The memory for the exception object is allocated in an unspecified way, except as noted in 3.7.4.1. The final reference, [basic.stc.dynamic.allocation]/4, says: [Note: In particular, a global allocation function is not called to allocate storage for [...] an exception object (15.1). — end note]


4

I can't see any exponential growth in the numbers. Size going from 10^5 to 10^6 (10x) increases memory consumption roughly 5x. Going from 10^6 to 10^7 (10x) increaes memory consumption roughly 10x. So it's linear. The first few numbers (small vector sizes) play little role here - the memory used by the vector is probably dominated by other needs of your ...


4

The runtime growth has to be exponential, for push_back to be amortized O(1). If you'd grow one element at a time, growing a 100.000 element vector would take 100.000 element copies. However, in this case the vector doesn't grow at all. You just initialize a vector with exponentially increasing sizes. Its size is linear in the sire requested. No surprise ...


4

When I compile the code you have now on linux, I get the following warning: t614.cu(55): warning: __shared__ memory variable with non-empty constructor or destructor (potential race between threads) This type of warning should not be ignored. It is associated with this line of code: __shared__ double3c blockmean[THREADS_PER_BLOCK]; Since the ...


4

Your code is producing an intentional buffer overflow by having sscanf copying a string bigger than the allocated space into the memory allocated by malloc. This "works" because in most cases, the buffer that is allocated is somewhere in the middle of a page so copying more data into the buffer "only" overwrites adjacent data. C (and C++) don't do any array ...


4

Dynamic memory allocation is generally banned in embedded systems programming, particularly in safety-critical embedded software. All industry standards for safety-critical software bans it: MISRA-C, DO178B, IEC 61508, ISO 26262 and so on. There are many well-known issues with dynamic memory allocation: slow and possibly indeterministic access time, memory ...


4

By default Sqlite database get stored in app memory (/data/data/pkgname/databases/mydb.db). If you want you can store database on internal phone memory as well as on sdcard also.


4

The relevant parts of the standard are 6.7.2 (5). Each of the comma-separated sets designates the same type, except that for bit-fields, it is implementation-defined whether the specifier int designates the same type as signed int or the same type as unsigned int. ...this explains why you (can) get -1 instead of 1 for the set bits. The other is 6.7.2.1 ...


4

No, that code does not have a memory leak. No, you should not be disposing of those SPWeb objects. If you do dispose of them then when those SPWeb objects are used on subsequent requests, or in subsequent locations of the current request, it will fail. The framework code created the SPWeb object and assigned it to the current context is responsible for ...



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