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58

The Mercator map projection is a special limiting case of the Lambert Conic Conformal map projection with the equator as the single standard parallel. All other parallels of latitude are straight lines and the meridians are also straight lines at right angles to the equator, equally spaced. It is the basis for the transverse and oblique forms of ...


12

use point1.distanceTo(point2) var Geographic = new OpenLayers.Projection("EPSG:4326"); var Mercator = new OpenLayers.Projection("EPSG:900913"); function distanceBetweenPoints(latlng1, latlng2){ var point1 = new OpenLayers.Geometry.Point(latlng1.lon, latlng1.lat).transform(Geographic, Mercator); var point2 = new ...


7

You cannot merely transpose from longitude/latitude to x/y like that because the world isn't flat. Have you look at this post? Converting longitude/latitude to X/Y coordinate UPDATE - 1/18/13 I decided to give this a stab, and here's how I do it:- public class MapService { // CHANGE THIS: the output path of the image to be created private static ...


7

The geoserver pointer for this is continuous map wrapping. In geoserver 2.0.1+ and above this problem can be resolved by starting geoserver with the following JVM options: -DADVANCED_PROJECTION_HANDLING=true -DUSE_STREAMING_RENDERER=true In the upcoming geoserver 2.1.X, this settings are turned on by default. example image of a map projected in ...


7

Both formulas are equal. sec(x) + tan(x) = [ 1 + sin(x) ] / cos(x) tan(pi/4 + x/2) = sin(pi/4 + x/2) / cos(pi/4 + x/2) = = [cos(x/2) + sin(x/2)] / [cos(x/2) - sin(x/2)] = = [cos(x/2) + sin(x/2)]^2 / [cos(x/2) - sin(x/2)] / [cos(x/2) + sin(x/2)] = = [1 + 2*cos(x/2)*sin(x/2)] / [cos^2(x/2) - sin^2(x/2)] = = [1 + sin(x)] / ...


5

GPS Coordinates to Pixels Assuming this map does not cross prime meridian Assuming pixel 0,0 is upper left, and pixel 600,800 is lower right. Assuming map is Northern Hemisphere Only (no part of map is southern hemisphere) Determine the left-most longitude in your 800x600 image (X) Determine the east-most longitude in your 800x600 image (Y) Determine ...


5

This is a GIS question and would not be solved easily unless you're using the proper tools. Use QGIS to open the US Shapefile data EDIT In the case the shapefiles I linked to are not exactly the ones you were looking for then Google for "US shapefiles". Shapefiles are actually a group of geospatial (and not just one file). Reproject your layer to the ...


5

Java version of original Google Maps JavaScript API v3 java script code is as following, it works with no problem public final class GoogleMapsProjection2 { private final int TILE_SIZE = 256; private PointF _pixelOrigin; private double _pixelsPerLonDegree; private double _pixelsPerLonRadian; public GoogleMapsProjection2() { ...


3

I created a bl.ock with the NYC boroughs here. You were on the right path with WSG84/Mercator as that was what the original data was in, as a quick check in QGIS demonstrated. QGIS was also good checking the centre of the data, again which came out to be [-73.94, 40.70]. Note that these are the opposite way round to your co-ordinates which were lat and ...


3

Problem solved. Changing the order to LeftLon UpperLat RightLon BottomLat in my second approach gdal_translate did it for me!!


3

Kevin McCurley has created some maps of the United States, including a map of all 50 states, in the Mercator projection. If you look at the source of that final link, it consists of (latitude, longitude) pairs for the outlines of the states, which are then transformed into (x, y) pairs for display in the svg format. His allowed usage is Feel free to ...


3

A new map from scratch It's easy to create a map from the free shapefile which is provided in pretty high resolution by the USGS. Actually, some guy has already created a shapefile->svg translation script that does just that for you but note that the project has been moved to GitHub. Unfortunately the shapefile is in the NAD83 projection so it needs to ...


2

Unfortunately the only solution here is to reproject data from one projection to another. Most logical would be of course to reproject EPSG:26912 to EPSG:900913. Geoserver can help you out with this as it can reproject both WMS and WFS


2

The map you want to use doesn't have any geographic information attached to it, i.e. you would have to translate geocoordinates to map coordinates manually. You might be better off using a GeoJSON file with data for India in it. Have a look at the examples at the D3 wiki to get an idea how to do that.


2

Here: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/geodata/catalog/national/html/us_state.htm you can download a shp file with the data. The shape format includes a dbf with some attributes, including coordinates for each state. Also, you can use shp2text to extract all the information. Edit: Data in the map is in North American Datum of 1983, but you can use the Spreadsheet ...


2

If you know the map coordinates (left, right, top bottom), you can easily work out how much each pixel represents. Using this and the GPS lat long, just draw a circle at the correct pixel. So for the X location: (this is not code) Map left = 10 Map Right = 15 Image Width = 1000 pixels Therefore: each pixel = (15-10)/ 1000 = 0.005 You are ...


2

I'd like to point out that the code in the procedure bounds should read double bound(double val, double valMin, double valMax) { double res; res = Math.max(val, valMin); res = Math.min(res, valMax); return res; }


1

I will assume that the points are A: (0, 50), B: (0, 40), C: (10, 50) and D: (10, 40). The feature enclosed by the points (A, C, D, B) will look as a square using the equirectangular projection. Now, the points are longitude, latitude pairs, you can compute the great-arc distance between the points using d3.geo.distance. This will give you the angular ...


1

You can put vector-effect="non-scaling-stroke" on the line but beware, it won't work on IE.


1

Javascript has it's lat and long round the opposite way to the rest of the world, so what you've given D3 is a longditue of 19 and a latitude of -99. Obviously there is no latitude of -99 hence the NaN. Now if you just reverse your geo variable to var geo = [-99, 19] all should be good.


1

From what I understood, you are facing a few problems here. Use a map controller with offline tiles Mark the current location on the map Route the user from point A to point B Map controller Basically, the location providers on Android will be feeding your application with some global positioning coordinates (longitude and latitude) and you want to ...


1

you can use Libraries to convert form WGS84 (lon/lat) to Mercator: for Java use eg. geotools or proj4j if you whant to implement that by yourself: the article at Wikipedia is quite useful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercator_projection


1

But something's not quite right. Can anyone tell why I'm not getting the viewport coordinates when I pass in swlg,swlat,nelg,nelat and the zoom level You want to solve the space-filling-curve equation first with all 4 bounds coordinates. list($lng, $lat) = array ($row['lng'], $row['lat']); list($mx, $my) = $mercator->LatLonToMeters($lat, $lng); ...


1

If you're planning to use normal graphics techniques to wrap this around a sphere I don't think you strictly want to use Mercator projection as that doesn't work at the poles. The normal 3D texture mapping for spheres is simply a 2:1 aspect ratio bitmap, where the X axis maps directly to [0, 360) degrees of longitude and the Y axis to [-90, +90] degrees of ...


1

Thank you all for your suggestions & assistance. What I eventually found out is that it's not a formula or technical problem, I believe it's a methodology problem. You can't define the viewing area in Lat/Lng format, and expect to populate it with the appropriate Mercator projections. That's where the distortion happens. Instead, you have to define ...


1

You will need to define the projections and a suitable transform in OpenLayers. In turn, you will need to include the Proj4JS library (which is used by OpenLayers to perform these projection transformations)


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Here is a stackoverflow response with the JS math from lat long to mercator http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1019997/in-javascript-convert-lat-longs-to-x-y-co-ordinates download one of those shapefiles listed above and then use OGR to do ogr2ogr for converting to CSV get OGR here http://www.gdal.org/ogr/index.html Here is the doc for OGR ...


1

Indieprojector should be able to generate the files you need. It's a free online tool that reprojects any shapefile and exports it again to .svg. They even have US States included online so you won't need to mess with the Shapefile.


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Have you looked at NIMA products? http://egsc.usgs.gov/nimamaps/ and https://www1.nga.mil/ProductsServices/Pages/default.aspx They have a variety of maps, formats, etc. and all paid for by us taxpayers, so much is available to the public. Good first stop for maps.



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