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0

you need to join on both columns merge into party_type p using (select 1 party_id, 'Buyer' party_type from dual) t on (t.party_id = p.party_id and t.party_type = p.party_type) when matched then update set party_type = 'Service Provider' when not matched then insert (party_id,party_type) values(1,'Service Provider');


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#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN #include <windows.h> #undef WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN This can prevent windows.h from including the old winsock header file.


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I found the solution here: branch_to_revert="fix1"; git log --all --pretty=format:"%H %s" | grep -i "Merge branch '$branch_to_revert'" | grep -v "Revert" | awk '{print $1}' | xargs git revert -m 1


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As minitech comments, git merge --log does list the files to be merged (and append them to the actual message you could specify in git merge -m "..."). But the actual command to use is: git merge --log=1000 <other options depending on your merge> Don't forget to use a large enough number for the --log option: by default, only 20 commits are listed: ...


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All my branches are named in the form of Fix/fix- or Ftr/ftr- etc. Using Tower as my git front end, it neatly organizes all the Ftr/, Fix/, Test/ etc. into folders. Once I am done with a branch, I rename them to Done/...- That way the are still there (which can be handy to provide history) and I can always go back knowing what it was (feature, fix, test ...


1

While I probably would also transpose the dataset, it is possible to do so without transposing. data babies_doctors; set babies; do _i = 1 to nobs_doctors; set doctors point=_i nobs=nobs_doctors; array days day1-day6; if days[birth_Day] then output; end; run; This will not be fast, as it checks all rows in the dataset, but it's possible. ...


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I might shift the second dataset and then merge on day. Something like (in untested pseudo code): data new_1-new_6; set doctor; array day_1-day_6 day_{6} for i in 1 to 6: if day_{i} = 1 then do; day = i; output new_{i}; end; end; run; data stacked; set day_1-day_6; run; Then simply ...


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To merge a A within B: 1) In the project A git fast-export --all --date-order > /tmp/ProjectAExport 2) In the project B git checkout -b projectA git fast-import --force < /tmp/ProjectAExport In this branch do all operations you need to do and commit them. C) Then back to the master and a classical merge between the two branches: git checkout ...


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This should do the job. You first need to install a couple of packages: install.packages("dplyr") install.packages("tidyr") * Data * ed <- data.frame(experiment_num=rep(50, 6), timepoint=rep(c(10, 20, 20), 2), type=c("7a,b4", "7a,b4", "10a,b4", "7a,b6", "7a,b6", "10a,b6"), value=c(90, 89, 93, 85, 87, 88)) db <- ...


1

You did two things wrong. First to create the new branch you should do git checkout -t origin/test This would avoid any need to pull in the first place. Also when you run git checkout -b test while in master it creates a branch named test with master as base that has no relation to origin/test. When you pull origin/test onto that branch it will try ...


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If you want to overwrite your local changes which have not been committed, you can: git reset HEAD --hard git pull origin test If your changes have been committed, you can: git checkout <commit number> git pull origin test where commit number is the commit that origin:test branched from.


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You haven't pushed the changes after the merge. So effectively the remote contains changes before the merge. The next pull would mark conflicts just like it did when the original merge occurred. One way to avoid it would be to enable rerere Also IMHO, I thing rebasing master would be a better strategy than merging


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Reverting a merge on the branch is as simple as determining which commit was the previous one. First, checkout on the branch you want to modify. It's a git-golden-rule: you can only modify the branch you're on. git checkout master Then, figure out the previous-master commit it, and force master back into its previous state git reset --hard ...


0

Ideone.java: import java.util.*; public class Ideone { public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception { ArrayList<Interval> x = new ArrayList<>(); x.add(new Interval(1, 3)); x.add(new Interval(2, 6)); x.add(new Interval(8, 10)); x.add(new Interval(15, 18)); ...


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Here is your refined code: import java.util.*; import java.lang.*; import java.io.*; class Interval { int start; int end; Interval() { start = 0; end = 0; } Interval(int s, int e) { start = s; end = e; } } public class Ideone { public static void main(String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception { ...


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Script it maybe? #!/bin/bash # git-merge-upstream-to-master-and-rebase original_branch=$(git symbolic-ref --short HEAD) git checkout master && git merge upstream/master && git checkout "$original_branch" && git rebase master You can save it somewhere in your bin path and make it executable. After that, you can start using ...


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is there a way to prevent auto-staging of any (all) files in a merge? Yes. Use git merge --no-ff --strategy=ours to leave a no-op merge uncommitted, that's baseline for doing a hand-roll merge, then use git read-tree's merge setup to do all the low-level prep except conflict resolution, selecting options for which situations you want it to handle for ...


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You can use join, but you first need to set the index: dropData=pd.read_csv('.../inputDrop.csv', header=0, index_col='Date_Time', parse_dates=True) deosData=pd.read_csv('.../inputDeos.csv', header=0, index_col='Date_Time', parse_dates=True) dropData.join(deosData)


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You need to parse_dates when reading csv file, so that Date_Time columns in both dataframes are of pd.Timestamp object instead of raw strings. (if you look at your csv file, one is in ISO format YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS whereas the other is in MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM) Try the following codes: #read in CSV to dataframe dropData = pd.read_csv("inputDrop.csv", header=0, ...


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Won't that do the trick? $result = []; foreach ($originalArrays as $array) { $result[$array[0]][] = $array; }


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$keys = array_keys(array_merge($array1, $array2)); // get all the keys foreach ($keys as $key) { // set each key in the result array to the value from the input array or a default '' $result[$key][] = isset($array1[$key]) ? $array1[$key] : ''; $result[$key][] = isset($array2[$key]) ? $array2[$key] : ''; } echo json_encode($result);


1

Use array_merge with an array of default values $array1 = array("color" => "red","size" => "32"); $array2 = array("color" => "blue","width" => "40"); $arrayInit = array("color" => "","width" => "","size"=>""); $array1 = array_merge($arrayInit,$array1); $array2 = array_merge($arrayInit,$array2); $result = array_merge_recursive($array1, ...


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Short answer In the beta branch: Find the SHA1 of the commit that corresponds to the merge. Run git revert <sha1> -m 1 There is a caveat: Git will still think that this feature branch is merged into the beta branch, and to merge this branch again you'll need to revert (again) the commit introduced by this git revert before merging. Longer version ...


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You should use function array_merge_recursive. Try this code: $result = array_merge_recursive($users, $items); print_r($result); For 2nd result do: $result2 = array(); foreach ($users as $key => $val) { $result2[$key] = array_merge((array)$val, array('items' => $items[$key])); } Edit: For the first merge, according to solution phil dot ...


1

Here's a solution. Find patterns: pat <- c("^AGT.{3}GT$", "^.(T|G)TA$", "^GAT$") n <- length(pat) indList <- lapply(pat, grep, v$X1) Generate colors: library(RColorBrewer) col <- colorRampPalette(brewer.pal(8, "Paired"))(n) Add colors to data frame: colFull <- rep(col, sapply(indList, length)) v$color <- ...


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You can do this: library(stringr) x = setNames(c('AGT.{3}GT','.[T|G]TA','GAT'),c("#FE7F01","#FE7F00","#FE8002")) sapply(v[,1],function(u) names(x)[str_detect(u,x)]) #$AGTACAGT #[1] "#FE7F01" "#FE7F00" #$AGTGAAGT #[1] "#FE7F01" #$TGTA #[1] "#FE7F00" #$GTTA #[1] "#FE7F00" #$GAT #[1] "#FE8002" #$GAT #[1] "#FE8002" Notice that the pattern you mention ...


1

You can write git status to reveal what files that need's to be changed. Be sure to correct and add those files to your commit. You can also check out some guides for how to merge correctly as mentioned above on these links: https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Git-Branching-Basic-Branching-and-Merging And the mergetool: http://git-scm.com/docs/git-mergetool


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First, make sure to follow the comment in the guide: Be sure to create at least one initial commit prior to doing the sub-tree merges. If that doesn't work you might try doing the following: for each repo, make a commit putting the code in a subdirectory like you eventually want then, follow the tutorial For example, in 201PracticalExcerise ...


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You may use getanID from library(splitstackshape) to create a .id column in each dataset based on the duplicate elements in 'idno_simple'. We join the datasets with the devel version of data.table, which also has on option so that we don't need to set the key. Instructions to install the devel version are here library(splitstackshape) ...


0

Rather than use np.array_split, use np.split() # Perfunctory imports. import pandas as pd import numpy as np # Confirm the length of your initial dataframe. len(df) # Create two new data frames, via split, split it multiplying the # length of the original dataframe by .80 (80%). # np.split returns a list of arrays, so we can use the tuple # syntax to ...


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Using dplyr f <- function(x)setNames(lookup$letter, lookup$number)[x] library(dplyr) example %>% mutate_each(funs(f)) # a b c #1 A E A #2 B D D #3 C C C #4 D B B #5 E A E Or with data.table library(data.table) setDT(example)[, lapply(.SD, f), ] # a b c #1: A E A #2: B D D #3: C C C #4: D B B #5: E A E


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Here's a solution that works on each column successively using lapply(): as.data.frame(lapply(example,function(col) lookup$letter[match(col,lookup$number)])); ## a b c ## 1 A E A ## 2 B D D ## 3 C C C ## 4 D B B ## 5 E A E Alternatively, if you don't mind switching over to a matrix, you can achieve a "more vectorized" solution, as a matrix will allow ...


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merge(a, b, all = TRUE, by = "Type") If you wanted the naming you showed, setNames(merge(a, b, all = TRUE, by = "Type"), c("Type", "CountA", "CountB")) Note you'll get NA for missing values. Having an empty value would require you to coerce them into strings. merged <- setNames(merge(a, b, all = TRUE, by = "Type"), c("Type", "CountA", "CountB")) ...


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Here is my base R solution let me know if I get it. DF3 <- merge(DF1, DF2, by = "PC") DF3[!duplicated(DF3$Ref) , ] PC Line.x Ref Line.y ID 1 PP1 9RT 92 Parade Street, Yorky 32453 92 Street, Parade, Yorkie OYUIY 2 PP1 9TR 99 York Parade, Yorkie 23412 99 York Parade, Yorky ...


0

hg shelve lets you temporarily put aside (on a shelf) parts of the diff between the working directory and its parent, so it will give you the "remove some changes" part of what you want. It does not let you edit, but you could put what you have changed on one shelf, then reimplement the change. If you want to revert to the original change, you just put the ...


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One simple way is using reduce inbuilt method. >>> list_vals = (('2', '23', '29', '26'), ('36', '0')) >>> reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, list_vals) ('2', '23', '29', '26', '36', '0')


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A branch in Subversion is nothing but a copy. So if you used svn cp path/to/trunk path/to/branch to create the branch, you did everything right and can safely reintegrate your branch (including the history) to trunk once you're finished with your changes.


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N log N N comparisons to merge N elements (two N/2 lists) - each comparison yields one element of the final answer. There are log N levels to the recursion, so the total number of comparisons is ~ N log N. Edit: In each merge, we're left with a few elements in one list in the end, that we don't need to compare. So there will be a few less comparisons.


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It is better to use any 3-way merge tool like meld http://meldmerge.org/ which also takes in account the common ancestor for both these branches which means it is easier for you to identify the changes and work through merge. Using vi or text editor to merge large and conflicting code snippet becomes difficult since you cannot see the comparison in the same ...


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When you are grouping the stages together, you are partitioning sets of size 3 or 4. There is a package, partitions that implements set partitioning with setparts. Here I focus on that merging part, since it sounds like you already figured out the non-merged grouping. ## For unmerged, get groupings with something like this combos <- unlist(lapply(2:4, ...


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First you can merge branchA to the master. After that as you will try to merge the branchB to master from command line you will see the error something like Automatic merge failed; fix conflicts and then commit the result Now open your mainFile.txt of branchB. You will get one line present with your code <<<<<<< HEAD Because ...


0

Firstly, you are not merging two lists as you say in the question. What you're doing is making a list of list into a list. There are many ways you can do this. Apart from the ways listed in other answers, one possible solution could be: for i in range(0, len(list_of_list)): item = list_of_list[i] for j in range(0,len(item)): new_list = ...


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>>> main_list = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6,7],[8,9]] >>> [item for sublist in main_list for item in sublist] [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] This uses a nested list comprehension approach. A good explanation of how to read them can be found here. Think how you'd do it with regular loops. One outer loop will extract a list and an inner loop will append ...


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Using sum() , >>> tp = ( ('2', '23', '29', '26'), ('36', '0'), ('4', '2') ) >>> newtp = sum(tp, () ) >>> newtp ('2', '23', '29', '26', '36', '0', '4', '2') or itertools , >>> from itertools import chain >>> tp = ( ('2', '23', '29', '26'), ('36', '0'), ('4', '2') ) >>> newtp = tuple( chain(*tp) ) ...


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Use itertools.chain, and you can simply supply the list as arguments using * to expand them. >>> from itertools import chain >>> a_list = [[1], [2], [3]] >>> list(chain(*a_list)) [1, 2, 3] >>> tuple(chain(*a_list)) (1, 2, 3) Also do not use pre-defined types such as list as a variable name as this redefines them to not ...


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A similar question is How to prevent an automerge using git? FractalSpace gave an answer which I think useful: $ git checkout master $ git difftool -t kdiff3 local-branch HEAD The idea is using difftools instead of auto-merging tools to manually pick what you need and create new files.


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The order is absolutely not important. Hashes aren't sequential and mercurial doesn't sort or parse your semver tag names. Could be foo, bar, and baz for all mercurial cares. As long as you don't have two entries for the same tag name you're golden.


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The numpy function array_split should do the trick: import numpy as np np.array_split(df,2) It will return an array of 2 pandas objects.


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import pandas as pd df = pd.concat([pd.read_csv('file%d.csv' % x) for x in range(1,41)]) df.to_csv('output.csv')


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Short answer =FILTER({C3:C35; E3:E35},{C3:C35; E3:E35}<>"") Explanation The above formula is shorter than the one included in a comment of the question by the OP ={filter(Liste!C3:C35; LEN(Liste!C3:C35)); Filter(Liste!E3:E35; LEN(Liste!E3:E35))} Reference Using arrays in Google Sheets - Sheets Help



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