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3

You've implemented a version of quicksort that's doing everything "in-place" while your mergesort copies the content of left/right upon every recursive call (and same thing with merge()). That's probably the major reason for the differences. Second, like Luiggi mentioned in the comments above - how do you do your benchmarking ? do you get a proper JVM ...


3

You do not allocate memory in the split function: void split( int* num, int n, int** left, int** right, int middle) { left = # right = &num + middle; } The code above actually does not do anything useful: it modifies its arguments, period. Arguments themselves do not survive the function call. You should instead allocate copies of ...


3

The first while loop in the merge() method is faulty. You're assigning A[j] to C[k], while it should be B[j]. Also, you're incrementing k twice for if condition. Change the while loop to: while (i < nL && j < nR) { if (A[i] <= B[j]) { C[k] = A[i]; i = i + 1; } else { C[k] = B[j]; j = j + 1; } k = k + 1; } But, ...


3

For doing merge sort sequentially you should do following things in your recursive function: check the size of your array: if it is less or equal to 2, sort the array and return it. Split your array in two parts and call the recursive function for each half. Merge the result of two sorted arrays, that are coming from function calls from step 2. ...


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I like to look at it as "runs", where the ith "run" is ALL the recursive steps with depth exactly i. In each such run, at most n elements are being processed (we will prove it soon), so the total complexity is bounded by O(n*MAX_DEPTH), now, MAX_DEPTH is logarithmic, as in each step the bigger array is size 3n/5, so at step i, the biggest array is of size ...


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You are creating the wrong array type and casting it to a "T[]" here... T[] res = (T[]) new Comparable[f-i+1]; You need to create an array of type T which is not that straightforward. As there is no way to find out the actual type of a generic type variable at runtime, you might have to do something like this... public static <T extends ...


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Don't write the sort algorithem, instead, write a simple Comparer that will implement IComparer, convert your array to a list , sort that list, and then convert back to an array if needed. a Possible comparer will be something like that: Public WeekDayNameComparer<YourObject> : IComparer<yourObject> { private string[] WeekDays = {"sunday", ...


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I'm no expert on the topic, but the wikipedia page seems to be a good starting point http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merge_sort It contains a section on natural merge sort with an example. About binary merge sort: A variant named binary merge sort uses a binary insertion sort to sort groups of 32 elements, followed by a final sort using merge sort. It ...


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Your teacher is a clever guy, actually you need to understand what a mergesort does to merge two already sorted arrays. That's how mergesort works, it splits up the problem until there are two already sorted arrays, then it merges those arrays to one sorted array. This merging will be repeated until the whole array is sorted. That's what you need to do (the ...


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You have 1 malloc and 2 free's. That is always a problem. From wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_dynamic_memory_allocation The improper use of dynamic memory allocation can frequently be a source of bugs. These can include security bugs or program crashes, most often due to segmentation faults. Most common errors are as follows: Not ...


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Memory allocation is tricky, and not great to intermix with performance critical code(like sorting). Here's an example of an unsorted array with a corresponding auxiliary array for temporary storage. The advantage is 2 mallocs, followed by 2 frees. The disadvantage is 2x memory usage. // Code from Algorithms 4th edition - Robert Sedgewick, et al. int ...


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Concerning the recursion part of the merge sort, I've found this page to be very very helpful. You can follow the code as it's being executed. It shows you what gets executed first, and what follows next. Tom


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You are using a join() in the FJP version. Join() in Java7 creates continuation threads while the joining thread waits for the join to complete. In Java8, the thread just waits. Stream uses the CountedCompleter class which doesn't use join(). I've been writing a continuing critique of this framework since 2011. The article for Java8 is here If you replace ...


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As already said, l.pop(0) is a O(len(l)) operation and must be avoided, the above msort function is O(n**2). If efficiency matter, indexing is better but have cost too. The for x in l is faster but not easy to implement for mergesort : iter can be used instead here. Finally, checking i < len(l) is made twice because tested again when accessing the element ...


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You need to change: mergeSort(list, front, back); To: mergeSort(list, mid, back); It's going to result in an infinite call to mergeSort because you don't change any of the input parameters between calls. You will also probably want to change: if(mid==front) return; to: if(back - front <= 1) return; Also, your implementation choice for this ...


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The problem lies in your nested synchronized blocks: synchronized(left) { synchronized (right) { Thread lThread = new Thread(…); Thread rThread = new Thread(…); lThread.start(); rThread.start(); try { left.wait(); right.wait(); } … You are holding both locks when you start the new ...


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Firstly I should ask, are you required to use your own merge sort method? If not you should have your class implement implements Comparator<Employee> and @Override public int compare(Employee o1, Employee o2) { return Integer.compare(o1.getIdNumber(), o2.getIdNumber()); } Or use Arrays.sort(arr, new Comparator<Employee>() { ...


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try this solution: class Stock { public int Value; public string Day; } Dictionary<string, int> dic = new Dictionary<string, int>(); dic.Add("Monday", 0); dic.Add("Tuesday", 1); dic.Add("Wednesday", 2); dic.Add("Thursday", 3); dic.Add("Friday", 4); var stocks = new Stock[] { new Stock { Day = "Tuesday", Value= 10 }, ...


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Use a collection for the objects that supports custom comparators, or just implement IComparable on your object as demonstrated here. Then just use a static map of your property to an ordering or if you can map your string property to the DayOfWeek enum then use that built-in ordering.


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Change data.set(x, c.get(x)); by data.set(i+x-1, c.get(x));. To have a code easier to follow, since java arrays are 0 indexed, I would certainly base all indices on 0 for simplicity, to avoid having all this (p-1) and (q-1) stuff.


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You are doing everything right, except below mentioned part of your merge mehthod merge(ArrayList data, int i, int m, int j). //copy c back to data for(int x = 0; x < c.size(); x++) { data.set(x, c.get(x)); } here you are copying data from c to data at wrong place. Since you have merged list from i to j, you should copy data from c ...


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In 2nd for loop, you are starting (i) with (left.Length - 1). What you want is for (int i = right.Length, j = 0; (j <= right.Length - 1) && (i <= toBeSorted.Length - 1); i++, j++) { right[j] = toBeSorted[i]; } Also, the value (left.Length - 1) at which you end your first loop is the same value at which you are starting the next loop. ...


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First, pair off each student (1&2, 3&4, 5&6... etc), and you check and see which pairs are in the same class. The first student of the pair gets "promoted". If there an "oddball" student, they are in their own class, so they get promoted as well. If a single class contains >=50% of the students, then >=50% of the promoted students are also in ...


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Your merge method has many problems. Take every for loop in there and write a 1-line comment describing what it's supposed to do. Do not declare a variable (like j) and then reuse it for multiple loops. Confine the loop variable to the loop scope, e.g. for (int j = ..; .. ; ..). Correct your indentation and make sure that the nested loops were really ...


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You're not iterating far enough: for (int i = iFirst; i < first.size() - iFirst; i++) { a.set(j, first.get(i)); j++; } for (int i = iSecond; i < second.size() - iSecond; i++) { a.set(j, second.get(i)); j++; } At this point one of the lists has been completely consumed and you just need to copy all the remaining elements of the other ...



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