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4

Your while condition seems wrong. You are looping as long as one of the two containers are not empty and then subsequently calling the front() member function on them. You should probably be looping till both of them have elements in them, i.e. use && on line 21 instead of ||. So this line while((!buffer1.empty()) || (!buffer2.empty())) // ...


3

You are missing base cases - so you get infinite recursion. Trying stepping through your example with lists like [] or [1] and you'll fall straight into the problem. mergesort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a] mergesort [] = [] -- < ADDED mergesort [x] = [x] -- < ADDED mergesort list = merge (mergesort (left list)) (mergesort (right list)) where ...


1

The segfault happens on the line: if (buffer1.front() < buffer2.front()) A queue is typically just implemented as a wrapper around a deque or list you can find a more descriptive caution against calling front in their methods that you can in queue's method: Calling front on an empty container is undefined[1][2] If you're running under Debug in ...


1

A general principle you should follow is unit testing small bits of code. In this case, you should test the merge function, to see if what you get when you merges is correct. If you had written a test which merges two very small arrays, then you would have seen the result be in descending order, and the inversion count would usually be wrong. Here's the ...


1

Same question posted here, Javascript implementation of the inversion-counting with merge-sort algorithm. This describes everything that you need.


1

Well,I figured this out-> Let us say we want to merge not 2 arrays but r no of arrays. And let the total no of elements be n While merging ,we would be accessing data elements from each array and then comparing with others to find out the minimum one(For Ascending Order Arrangement) to be added to the merged array. The work done in comparison and finding ...


1

In the merge method, when copying from one of the input arrays to the results, you cast to int. For example: result[resultIndex++] =(int) ds[counterForLeft++]; All your doubles are in the range [0...1), so the result of casting any of them to int is zero. Just get rid of those casts, and you will keep your numbers in the merge result. As an additional ...


1

That would be a way to go on Linux: Compile your program with debug info (g++ -g merger_sort.cpp -o merger_sort) Load it in debuger: >>> gdb merge_sort Run it: (gdb) run. You will see: Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x0000000000400b1e in merge_sort (A=0x7ffffffddda0, p=0, r=1) look at the position in the code: (gdb) ...


1

O(n log n + n) is the same thing as O(n log n). n log n grows faster than n, so the n term is extraneous.


1

You are ordering strings: '9989' < '999' < '9990'. If you want to order integers, you'll have to convert your input list to integers.


1

Consider this: val left = src.slice(from, mid).buffered val right = src.slice(mid, until).buffered (from until until) foreach { k => dst(k) = if(!left.hasNext) right.next else if(!right.hasNext || left.head < right.head) left.next else right.next }


1

How can this be possible? Unlike C++, Python is quite difficult to parallelize because of the GIL. While collections.deque's append and popleft are thread-safe, this does not guarantee that they'll perform well in a non-serial paradigm. Is it linked to this question? No. The GIL is a property of CPython. It is totally disjoint from false sharing. ...


1

I don't know why you say: Here I just passed the value (pass by value) in the funtions without using pointers. because, when you use mergesort(int a[],int start,int end) merge(int a[],int start,int mid,int end) Then a[] is as same as when you use *a. It is using the pointer way.


1

In C and similar languages the first array dimension of a function parameter is rewriten as a pointer. So your interfaces void merge(int a[],int start,int mid,int end); void mergesort(int a[],int start,int end); are exactly the same as void merge(int* a,int start,int mid,int end); void mergesort(int* a,int start,int end); So actually for arrays, you ...


1

You can't directly pass arrays by value in C (best you can do is wrap a fixed-size array in a struct). In a parameter list int a[] is exactly equivalent to int *a. So you are using pointers and that's why the array is sorted.


1

left.erase(v.begin()); Never ever do this. foo.erase requires a member of foo. Even if you wrote left.erase(left.begin());, this would still be a terrible coding, and I mean terrible. Unless you erase last element, or one very close to the end, erasing a vector element is slow like hell. It takes O(N) steps. So don't erase (or insert, for that matter)...


1

Your code breaks because you are using erase incorrecrly: you need to pass the begin() of the vector being erased. However, using erase is a bad idea to begin with, because it makes your sort asymptotically slower by a factor of N. You should make a pair of iterators, one for left and the other one for right, and move them as you progress through your ...



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