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6

Your Merge() signature does not match how you invoke it: Signature: void Merge(int *A,int *L,int leftCount, int *R, int rightCount) Invokation: Merge(A,L,R,mid,n-mid); This causes undefined behavior when you parse (and later use) a pointer (R) as an integer (leftCount), and an integer (mid) as a pointer (R). Pretty sure your compiler would have given ...


5

Get yourself used to compile with -Wall (if you're using gcc). If you did so, you would have seen that you invoke Merge() with the wrong arguments. It should be: Merge(A,L,mid,R,n-mid); Also, you shouldn't return from inside the loop that prints the array elements. This is why you only see a 1. Look at the code carefully: the loop body returns ...


5

I think this should explain what is happening: matt$ python >>> '19' < '2' True >>> int('19') < int('2') False When comparing strings, the string '19' is less than the string '2' because the character '1' comes before the character '2'. If you convert the strings to numbers, the sorting should come out correctly.


3

It appears that you were getting bogged down by the Arrays.copyOfRange() method. Try this code instead: public void recMergeSort(int[] tempArray){ if (tempArray.length > 1 ){ int mid=(tempArray.length)/2; // mid = 2 int[] left = Arrays.copyOfRange(tempArray, 0, mid); // [10, 20] ...


2

If you really wanna sort by 'age', how about using Counting Sort (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counting_sort)? You can maintain same relative order as original in at most 2 iterations or 2n lookups.


2

From the javadoc of Collections.sort(): This sort is guaranteed to be stable: equal elements will not be reordered as a result of the sort. So don't reinvent the wheel, and just use the standard sort algorithm that the JDK provides: Collections.sort() or, better if using Java 8: List.sort(). Without any warmup that would allow the JIT to optimize the ...


2

The subList method creates a new list from the original one, but still holds a reference to the original elements, such that any change made in the first will affect the second and vice-versa. In your merge method, you are overwriting your original list and at the same time changing the greater elements in the sublist that do not pass your if condition. ...


2

If you want to use heapq.merge while skipping blank lines, you can create your own generator function to handle the skip logic: def iterate_non_blank_lines(file_iterator): for line in file_iterator: if line != "": yield line Note: I have simply checked for blank lines, but you could easily use a regular expression here to skip ...


2

void mergesort_pot2(char *key[], int n) { int j, k; char **w; w = calloc(n, sizeof(char*)); for (k = 1; k < n; k *= 2) { for (j = 0; j < n - k; j += 2 * k) merge(key + j, key + j + k, w + j, k, k); for (j = 0; j < n; ++j) key[j] = w[j]; } free(w); } void mergesort(char *key[], int ...


2

There are two mistakes in the algorithm. Mistake 1: while (i < r.length && j < r.length) { if (l[i] <= r[j]) { v[k] = l[i]; i++; } else { v[k] = r[j]; j++; } k++; } Here the i must be less than l.length. This is the reason for ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException if l.length != r.length. Mistake ...


2

peek() peeks ahead at the next character in the file. In your case, the next character in the file after "40" is a space character, ASCII space, or 32, which is less than 40.


2

If you have a look at the documentation to System.arrayCopy, it expects as the second argument an index into the array. However, you have there a value from your array. So most probably you wanted to write System.arraycopy(right, rightIndex, ... instead of System.arraycopy(right, right[rightIndex], ... The same for your second call of System.arraycopy


1

Getting to break mergesort to run in Θ(n^2logn) is not as simple as the intuition says, the first thing you'd try to do is to "break" merge and make it run in Θ(n^2) instead of Θ(n) it can be done by merging the two lists to a new list, which is a linked - list, without remembering the end of the list, so each insertion is Θ(n) - what makes each merge step ...


1

You have created ever ending loop due to incorrect calculation of midIndex: public static void mergeSort(int[] input, int beginIndex, int endIndex) { int midIndex = input.length/2; mergeSort(input,beginIndex,midIndex);//This is where issue is Correction Needed in code as below: int midIndex = (endIndex+beginIndex)/2;


1

In the past i have made a method to sort strings alphabetically in an array as school HW, so umm here it is: private void sortStringsAlphabetically(){ for (int all = 0; all < names.length; all++) { for (int i = all + 1; i < names.length; i++) { if (names[all].compareTo(names[i]) > 0) { String tmp = ...


1

The reason you got java.lang.StackOverflowError is because your left array will never become array of size 1. If it enters if block then it means mid minimum will be 1 as tempArray can be 2 for it to satisfy. Then when you are copying to left 0-2, you are copying all the element again to left and right is empty


1

Too many recursions I think. From Java documentation. Thrown when a stack overflow occurs because an application recurses too deeply. By the way: See what happens when tempArray.length equals 2. Your code has a bug I think. int mid=(tempArray.length)/2; //mid equals 1 //calls with params tempArray, 0, 2 int[] ...


1

Sort the interval by end time (this is O(nlogn)), then apply the DP solution that follows the recursive formulas: Let start[1,...,n] be an array containing start times Let end[1,....,n] be an array containing end times Let values[1,...,n] be an array containing values of each presentations Assume arrays are already sorted, such that the `i`th element in all ...


1

Generally if you had a list and wanted to sort it merge sort is a good solution. But in your case you can make it better. You have a string separated by spaces and you break it and put it in list's nodes. Then you want to sort the list. You can do better by combining both steps. 1) Have a linked list with head and tail and pointers to previous node. 2) As ...


1

You've made a simple mistake. Merge sort works my splitting the array, sorting to the two halves, then merging the results. Your mergeSort: method does the split, doesn't sort the two halves, and then calls merge: to merge the two (unfortunately unsorted) halves. Before calling merge: you need to make recursive calls to mergeSort: to sort the two halves - ...


1

I dont understand why do you people want the long way.. Even though there are already easy way of doing this... I made one myself hope this will help you.. - (NSArray *)arrayMergeSort:(NSArray *)targetArray { if (targetArray.count < 2) return targetArray; long midIndex = targetArray.count/2; NSArray *arrayLeft = [targetArray ...


1

Suppose you input a vector of size 2; then according to your code mid=1; for(int i=0;i<mid-1;i++) // here i < (1-1) which will never execute l[i]=v[i];


1

There is a Small error it is easy to over look this , indices in line of your merge function A[start + i - 1] should be start + i Because you begin looping i from 0 and value of start can also get 0 which makes it start + i -1 and for the iteration where start == i == 0 your index becomes -1 which is actually the last element of your list in Python ...


1

I think you can do it by serial step: step 1: split 10 Million objects into 2^N slices, and sort for each slice; step 2: use selectsort for the head objects from 2 slices and merge into new slice; step 3: again and again do step 2, util just only 1 slice.


1

I prefer using merge sort as it does not add space complexcity. Quickost would also be considered providing space & memory allocation is not a constraint


1

Your recursive calls to mergeSort suggest that p and r are the indices of the first and last item of a subarray to be sorted: void mergeSort(int* a, int p, int r) { if(p<r) { int q=(p+r)/2; mergeSort(a,p,q); mergeSort(a,q+1,r); merge(a,p,q,r); } } If so, your call in main is incorrect: int arr[]={5,4,3,2,1}; ...


1

L[i]=A[p+i]; // 5. L[i] = A[p+i-1] I think this is your problem, you do not follow the algorithm here, by fixing it a little (not using -1 because you start at 0) but in the next loop, you don't +1 when you're also not starting at the same number in the algorithm? R[j]=A[q+j]; // 7. R[j] = ...


1

A bottom up merge sort is more appropriate for sorting a linked list. An efficient method for doing this is to use an array of pointers to the first nodes of lists, where the number of nodes pointed to by array[i] is 2^i (2 to the power i), or array[i] is an empty list. The double linked list can be treated as a single linked list during the merge sort and ...



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