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3

You are missing base cases - so you get infinite recursion. Trying stepping through your example with lists like [] or [1] and you'll fall straight into the problem. mergesort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a] mergesort [] = [] -- < ADDED mergesort [x] = [x] -- < ADDED mergesort list = merge (mergesort (left list)) (mergesort (right list)) where ...


1

The segfault happens on the line: if (buffer1.front() < buffer2.front()) A queue is typically just implemented as a wrapper around a deque or list you can find a more descriptive caution against calling front in their methods that you can in queue's method: Calling front on an empty container is undefined[1][2] If you're running under Debug in ...


1

A general principle you should follow is unit testing small bits of code. In this case, you should test the merge function, to see if what you get when you merges is correct. If you had written a test which merges two very small arrays, then you would have seen the result be in descending order, and the inversion count would usually be wrong. Here's the ...


4

Your while condition seems wrong. You are looping as long as one of the two containers are not empty and then subsequently calling the front() member function on them. You should probably be looping till both of them have elements in them, i.e. use && on line 21 instead of ||. So this line while((!buffer1.empty()) || (!buffer2.empty())) // ...


0

It happens because when you write to memory out of bounds, the program's behaviour is undefined. One possible behaviour that may be observed is that n changes in value. The language does not specify any guarantees about the behaviour of the program. But from the implementation perspective, it is quite possible, that n and a[n] happen to share the same ...


0

Quick sort is an in-place sorting algorithm, so its better suited for arrays. Merge sort on the other hand requires extra storage of O(N), and is more suitable for linked lists. Unlike arrays, in liked list we can insert items in the middle with O(1) space and O(1) time, therefore the merge operation in merge sort can be implemented without any extra space....


0

We can think of the time taken for normal merge sort as follows (we merge 2 lists of size n/2, we merge 4 lists of size n/4, we merge 8 lists of size n/8, etc): 2(n/2) + 4(n/4) + 8(n/8) + 16(n/16) + ... + n(1) which simplifies to: n + n + n + ... + n = O(nlogn) For your new merge sort we have instead: 2(n/2)^2 + 4(n/4)^2 + 8(n/8)^2 + 16(n/16)^2 + ... + ...


0

Your MSORT-function has three body forms: (defun msort (l) (if ...) (if ...) (progn ...)) Since a function returns the value from the last form, the two IFs don't actually do anything. Their values are just discarded, and the value from the PROGN is always returned. To fix this, you should use COND. As people mentioned in the comments, you should ...


0

Your arr_3 contains array of arrays. You need to flatten it in the last line of merge method arr_3.flatten Also, I would recommend to use variable names that helps in understanding methods. You should also look at various methods that Array class has to offer as some of it can be useful in writing concise code. For example, below is one attempt to ...


1

Try this. from itertools import permutations [i for i in permutations(li,2)] Result [('m', 'i'), ('i', 'm')] Here is without permutations In [32]: [k for k in [(i,li[j])for i in li for j in range(2)] if len(set(k)) != 1] Out[32]: [('m', 'i'), ('i', 'm')]


2

There is too much wrong with the code: treats lists as vectors: if you want a Lisp data structure with random access, then use a vector. Not a list. doesn't declare variables while loops don't work at all imperative, instead of functional wrong code layout Best to start from scratch and to avoid above mistakes. If you want Lisp lists, then use a ...


3

There are quite a few things we can do to improve this code. 1. Indenting Lisp has relatively little syntax, but we use indenting to help highlight the structure of the code. Most Lisp aware editors help manage that. The most obvious departure from the conventional indenting approach is closing parentheses on following lines. I've Indented the mergelist ...


0

RangeError is coming due to too much recursive call to mergeSort. For the size of arr 2 size of rightArr will remain 2. Instead of var rightArr=arr.slice(m,n); You may do var rightArr=arr.slice(m+1,n);


0

Don't ignore return values from function calls in C. Start out by adding perror calls if your pthread calls do not return 0 and see what happens. You will see that the pthread_join calls are failing because you have RThread and LThread declared as globals. So you keep re-assigning them new values as you spawn off threads. Move those pthread_t declarations so ...


0

I found four problems with your merge-sort implementation. Firstly, the condition in the following while loop is incorrect: // Merge elements while(lowIndex <= midIndex && lowIndex2 <= highIndex) { You are incrementing lowIndex1 within the loop, not lowIndex, so the loop should look like the following: // Merge elements ...


0

// Merge elements while(lowIndex <= midIndex && lowIndex2 <= highIndex) { if (tmpArray[lowIndex1] <= tmpArray[lowIndex2]) { array[i] = tmpArray[lowIndex1]; lowIndex1++; } else { array[i] = tmpArray[lowIndex2]; } i++; } ...


1

A little late the the party, but I figured I'd throw my hat in the ring as my solution seems to run faster than OP's (on my machine, anyway): def merge_sort(arr): l = len(arr) if len(arr) < 2: return arr half = len(arr) // 2 left = merge_sort(arr[:half]) right = merge_sort(arr[half:]) out = [] li = ri = 0 # index of ...


2

count_inversions_fast(array, (int)sizeof(array)) << endl; You cannot determine runtime size of array using sizeof this way. It will always be sizeof(int*) (more genrally size of a void*). It will be 4 bytes on 32-bit platform, and 8 bytes on 64-bit platform. It will always give constant compile time size. You need to use: count_inversions_fast(array,...


0

I think the problem is that you haven't prototyped FrontBackSplit(head, &front, &back);before call. Than the compiler could not recognize the function. Try to put FrontBackSplit(ApNode* source, ApNode** frontRef, ApNode** backRef) function before void MergeSort(ApNode *head).


4

That is the problem with using that flag. The original exception means that there is something wrong with your Comparator or Comparable's comparison operation. Something about it is violating the Comparable contract1 that a valid comparison needs to obey. Essentially, it is a bug in your application. When you set that flag, you are telling the JVM to ...


2

1) In-place merge sort is used when you want to sort a list in O(nlogn) time while using less space than standard mergesort. 2) The whole purpose of sorting is the make the input arrays sorted, so not sorted input arrays will be sorted by the in-place mergesort. 3) Mergesort uses more memory because it creates two new arrays of half size for the two ...


0

You've got two unused variables j and k in your code. Your logic is flawed because you copy into the array until one half is empty, so you never actually empty both halves. public static void merge(int[] result, int[] left, int[] right) { int i1 = 0; // index into left array int i2 = 0; // index into right array int i; for (i = 0; i1 <...


1

So it should work now, you went beyond the bounds of the array. #include <iostream> using namespace std; int quicksort (int m[], int left, int right) { int i = left; int j = right; int middle = m[(left + right) / 2]; do{ while (m[i] < middle) i++; while (m[j] > middle) j--; if (i ...


2

When size_arr[k] == 129'992, the size of double sort_arr[size_arr[k]]; is 129'992 * sizeof(double) == 129'992 * 8 == 1'039'936. This is just shy of 1'048'576 == 1M (binary Mega). The C standard does not say where variable length arrays are stored (C++ does not define VLA at all), but typically they are allocated on the stack. using the VS JIT ...


0

In merge(), the code doesn't check to see if the end of a vector has been reached, specifically, if i >= firstList.size() or n >= secondList.size(), in which case the remainder of the other vector would be copied. The while statement should not have the -1 near the end. VS complains about the temp vector creation using &playlist[playlist.size()], since ...


0

I didn't see with a lot of attention, but maybe you want vector<song> secondHalf( &playlist[scope+1], &playlist[playlist.size()-1]); the &playlist[playlist.size()] without -1 I think is the source of your problem, but I have not tried.


2

Easiest way to accomplish this is to have one global variable count and you increment that variable each time you have comparison in Mergesort code. Either that or using pointers. In C when you pass argument to function, that argument gets copied so original will remain unchanged. That's the problem with your code. Please, read more here: Why would I pass ...



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