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12

I have now learned more than I cared to have known about metafiles. 1. Some of the Metafile class's constructor overloads work poorly and will operate on a truncated DPI value. Consider the following: protected Graphics GetNextPage(SizeF pageSize) { IntPtr deviceContextHandle; Graphics offScreenBufferGraphics; Graphics metafileGraphics; ...


12

Take a look at the 3rd party library Ab2d.ReadWmf. Update #1: Overview First off, this post states that Microsoft does not intend support EMF files in WPF. That doesn't mean it can't be done, just that they will not support them. Looking at the Wikipedia page about the WMF/EMF format I see that it describes EMF as: Essentially, a WMF file stores a ...


8

Here is a utility function that loads an EMF file and converts it into a WPF BitmapSource: public static class Emfutilities { public static BitmapSource ToBitmapSource(string path) { using (System.Drawing.Imaging.Metafile emf = new System.Drawing.Imaging.Metafile(path)) using (System.Drawing.Bitmap bmp = new ...


6

check out Bob Powel's web site. he has a metric-crap-ton of GDI+ stuff. this one is specifically for trans GIF's


6

You are creating TMetaFileCanvas with the ReferenceDevice parameter set to 0, so it will set ReferenceDevice to the HDC from GetDC(0), ie the screen. ReferenceDevice is used for getting resolution and capabilities that are used during the EMF drawing. For instance, when the TMetaFile's dimensions are empty, TMetaFileCanvas uses the dimensions of ...


5

It's well documented in the SDK article: This function converts an enhanced metafile into a Windows-format metafile so that its picture can be displayed in an application that recognizes the older format. The system uses the reference device context to determine the resolution of the converted metafile. and A Windows-format ...


4

What you've posted is an instance of an EnumMetaFileProc callback function, so we'll start with the signature: function Callback_EnumMetafile( hdc: HDC; lpHTable: PHandleTable; lpMFR: PMetaRecord; nObj: Integer; lpClientData: LParam ): Integer; stdcall; It begins by declaring a bunch of variables, but I'll skip that for now since I don't know ...


4

If you check for the MSDN official documentation, you'll get this statement: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd183351(VS.85).aspx An error occurs (and the function returns FALSE) if the source device context identifies an enhanced metafile device context. My first guess was that, even if the MSDN is talking only about the source device context, ...


4

The QGraphicsView class and its associated helpers can render to a QT metafile format through the QPicture class (for which you could write a translator to EMF), to SVG through the QSVGGenerator class and to postscript/pdf through QPrinter. It can also render to bitmap formats and various other targets. AFAIK it doesn't have a generic 'render to EMF' ...


4

My Hypothesis I believe this has to do with running a non-native resolution on an LCD monitor. In "the old days" CRTs didn't have a native resolution per se. So the computer was unaware of any preferred resolution for a given monitor size or aspect ratio. With newer digital displays (LCD) the computer is now aware of the preferred resolution and aspect ...


4

Create a second metafile. Use SetWorldTransform to create the rotation transform. Draw the first metafile onto the second and let the transform do the rest.


4

The MetaFile doesn't update itself until you free the MetaFileCanvas. (The code you posted actually shows that, but the call to Free has been commented out.) Embarcadero's example is wrong in another sense, too. All painting to the form should be done in the OnPaint event, not from anywhere else. (I blame that on much of the documentation sample code having ...


3

The code cannot work: Afaik the Metafile constructor expects a stream which already contains some metafile data (i.e. an '.wmf'-File) or is empty (for new metafiles) You should create a new metafile, create a graphics context from it, load the jpeg image into a separate Image object and draw it on the metafile context. Then you can save the metafile as ...


3

I was also looking for this but MicroSoft knows that nobody needs this and so it seems not to be possible. If you dare to disagree with the wisdom of Microsoft, you have the option of a workaround - like I did ... Create a macro (obviously you find the macros in the View and not the Developer ribbon ...): Sub PasteSpecialMetafile() ...


3

ClipRect being the only part in which you can draw is a false presumption. The documentation on TCustomCanvas.ClipRect: Use ClipRect to determine where the canvas needs painting. This is easily verified by drawing beyond ClipRect and trying to show what has been drawn, for example as follows: procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject); var ...


2

I have an EMF-generating PyQt QPaintEngine class here: https://github.com/jeremysanders/veusz/blob/master/document/emf_export.py. It uses the pyemf library, but I think it would be fairly easy to port to C++. Unfortunately the files are not compatible with OpenOffice as OO has pretty broken path support in EMF files. It also converts text to paths for ...


2

As to why your sizes may be different - once you Draw to the metafile you are turning over the responsibility to the Metafile for saving out the data. Your bit depth could be different in the output. I don't know for sure but I would also wonder if the StretchDraw call ends up saving the original input or if it saves a bitmap with the new number of pixels. ...


2

The ins and outs of working with TMetaFile/Canvas are more related to meta files than to the TMetaFile and TMetaFileCanvas implementations from my traumatic experience of working with it. Aka, you should rather look for information on how EMF (or WMF) works. The Delphi implementation simply calls windows to do everything as I understand it. You may wish to ...


2

It's actually simpler than you think... here's some of my code: var m: TMetafile; mc: TMetafileCanvas; begin m := TMetafile.Create; m.Width := 1000; m.Height := 1000; mc := TMetafileCanvas.Create(m, 0); //use mc just like any canvas... mc.Free; // you can use m for anything you want, preview, print, save ...etc. end; To copy ...


2

I'm curious as to how Windows knows the physical size of your monitor. You must have changed a configuration somewhere? Perhaps you can change it to more convenient values that divide out nicely. As implied by the name, a "Device Context" must be connected to a system device. However this does not need to be a hardware driver, it could be a device emulator ...


2

program Project1; {$APPTYPE CONSOLE} uses SysUtils, Types, Windows, Graphics; const SIZECONST = 3000; // should be larger than your screen resolution OFFSET = 1500; var //holds millimeter per pixel ratios MMPerPixelHorz, MMPerPixelVer: Integer; procedure CreateMyMetafile(var HmyGraphic: HENHMETAFILE; aHDC: HDC); var R: Trect; TheBrush: HBRUSH; ...


2

The "btnRotateClick" of Andrew has bugs! Fast increasing execution time after 10-15 clicks. If the user changes the global window settings in the control panel\Display or with "dpiScaling.exe" the image shrinks at every click. I have written an more simple version of btnRotateClick, that avoids rounding errors with div 2, but the bugs remain. procedure ...


1

This is a very hard task, it involves analytical hidden lines removal, polygon splitting and Z-sorting for final output as explained here: http://www.cs.drexel.edu/~david/Classes/CS430/HWs/p214-weiler.pdf


1

You wrote: Base64-decode the XML string, zlib-decompress it, and save it into the picture file "sample_original_bmp2emf_method2.emf". So it's definitively NOT an emf file, but some zipped format.. Or it was converted to another format (like vectorial) before converting to XML. In this case, you've less data in the resulting picture than a real bitmap. ...


1

Why don't you just compare the two images? Open them in a raster editing program and compare the pixels. Why do you care how big the files are? Surely what's important is whether or not the image is the right one.


1

The normal way is to create a much higher resolution memory DC, render to that and then save it however you want. Note that font sizes can get screwed up by this. HDC memDC = CreateCompatibleDC ( hDC ); HBITMAP memBM = CreateCompatibleBitmap ( hDC, nWidth, nHeight ); SelectObject ( memDC, memBM ); With nWidth , nHeight much larger. The CreateCompatible ...


1

Please take a look at the following pages ... 1) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zbk7dbtb.aspx 2) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms536391.aspx 3) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1h5aa6y9.aspx You can create a MetaFile object using the following constructor public Metafile(Stream stream) to take a MemoryStream as the final ...


1

Your code is hard to decipher. Simply drawing the metafile to a bitmap should get the job done. For example: Dim mf As Metafile = page.GetImage(TXTextControl.Page.PageContent.All) Using bmp As New Bitmap(mf.Width, mf.Height) Using gr As Graphics = Graphics.FromImage(bmp) gr.DrawImage(mf, 0, 0) End Using bmp.Save("c:\temp\test.tiff", ...


1

According to the MS-EMF spec, no. But ‘EMF plus’ extensions (MS-EMFPLUS) have a header with LogicalDpiX and LogicalDpiY. This format is analogous to GDI+. I don't know what software supports it for import/export though.


1

As I understand it the metafile does not contain information for the background - it is simply transparent. A simple work around is to simply colour the background the colour you want. E.g. The code below creates a bitmap the same size as the original image, draws the background white and then draws the metafile image on top of the background. ...



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