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7

Just specialize that one function: template <typename template_type> class awesome_class{ public: void some_function(void){ cout << "I am not of type_a and doing my normal methods"; } }; template<> void awesome_class<type_a>::some_function(void) { cout << "I am of type_a and doing type_a specific methods"; ...


6

Based on your +T{} test: Option #1: Expression SFINAE in trailing return type: #include <type_traits> template <typename T> auto test(int) -> decltype((void)+T{}, std::false_type{}); template <typename T> auto test(...) -> std::true_type; template <typename T> using is_enum_class = std::integral_constant<bool, ...


5

Using base R, you could so something like expr <- quote(x^t) do.call("substitute", list(expr, list(t=2))) # x^2


4

If you want to generate structs based on lists I would use higher order macros. This does not require you to have another macro that actually does the loop resolution. #define FRUITS(V) \ V(apple) \ V(banana) \ V(cherry) #define ANIMALS(V) \ V(dog) \ V(monkey) #define VISIT_ANI_STRUCT(A) \ Animal A; #define VISIT_FRU_STRUCT(F) \ ...


4

I'm not sure whether this is what you are looking for, but the parenthesised fruit and animal groups are not resolved. You can "flatten" them with your M_IDmacro, e.g.: #define M_ID(...) __VA_ARGS__ #define FRUITS M_ID(apple, banana, cherry) #define ANIMALS M_ID(dog, monkey) #define ZOO_BLOCK(NAME, FRTS, ANMLS) struct NAME##Block { \ ...


4

The difference between Runnable and Supplier is that Supplier uses a generic type. At runtime Supplier doesn't have a String get() method, it has Object get(). But the method you implement returns a String. You need to distinguish between those 2 types. Like this: public class MetafactoryTest { public static void main(String[] args) throws Throwable { ...


3

The function parse takes a string, parses it, and returns an expression. I see nothing wrong with using it for what you're talking about.


3

You're right that it's not possible to do any pointer arithmetics when specifying non-type template arguments of pointer type. The standard says so explicitly, C++11 14.3.2/1: A template-argument for a non-type, non-template template-parameter shall be one of: ... a constant expression (5.19) that designates the address of an object with static ...


3

Alternatively (and paralleling the example of how to do this given in the R Language Definition), you can use substitute() twice. expr <- quote(x^t) eval(substitute(substitute(e, list(t=2)), list(e=expr))) # x^2


3

There're many different ways in which you can implement something like this. To keep it simple, you can just evaluate the block within a new Screen object and return the result. class Screen attr_reader :texts def initialize @texts = [] end def label(hash) # Validation + check for other keys texts << hash[:text] end def to_s ...


3

You can't access local variables by name without using eval. Here are a few alternatives you could try: Storing the lambda in a Hash: hash = { 'mylambda' => ->{ 'foo' } } hash['mylambda'].call # => "foo" Storing the lambda in an instance variable: @mylambda = ->{ 'foo' } instance_variable_get('@mylambda').call # => "foo" Creating a ...


2

Mainly because of some implementation issues in C++03, the writers of the MPL had to use non-obvious techniques for representing sequences, one of which is the usage of types like boost::mpl::vector0<> boost::mpl::vector1<T> boost::mpl::vector2<T, U> ... etc Instead of simply writing boost::mpl::vector<> ...


2

Straightforward enough with preprocessor list iteration: #define M_NARGS(...) M_NARGS_(__VA_ARGS__, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0) #define M_NARGS_(_10, _9, _8, _7, _6, _5, _4, _3, _2, _1, N, ...) N #define M_CONC(A, B) M_CONC_(A, B) #define M_CONC_(A, B) A##B #define M_ID(...) __VA_ARGS__ #define M_LEFT(L, R) L #define M_RIGHT(L, R) R #define ...


2

One of the features: this template pattern can help you to avoid vtable usage. This called "Static polymorphism" - http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curiously_recurring_template_pattern Suppose you have this code structure: class Item { public: virtual void func() = 0; } class A : public Item { // … } class B : public Item { // … } Item *item = new ...


2

class Class def my_initialize(*vars) define_method :initialize do |*args| if args.length != vars.length raise ArgumentError, 'wrong number of arguments' end vars.zip(args).each do |var, arg| instance_variable_set :"@#{var}", arg end end end end class C my_initialize :a, :b end The Module#define_method ...


2

Why not just use the this keyword? When i explored type level programming myself, i could not see a difference when using this instead of self. sealed trait BoolType { type Not <: BoolType type Or[That <: BoolType] <: BoolType type And[That <: BoolType] = this.type#Not#Or[That#Not]#Not type Imp[That <: BoolType] = ...


2

With bind, that Binds words to a specified context (in this case local context of function), and compose function, I get: cascade: func [ times template start /local ?1 ] [ ?1: start template: compose [?1: (template)] loop times bind template '?1 ?1 ] cascade 8 [?1 * 2] 1 == 256 cascade 3 [add 4 ?1] 5 == 17 ...


2

You check whether the enumeration is convertible to int. template <class T> using is_scoped_enum = std::integral_constant<bool, !std::is_convertible<T,int>{} && std::is_enum<T>{}>; These static assertions will succeed: enum e {}; enum class e2 {}; static_assert( ...


2

So, you asked two questions here: How to metaprogramatically typecast Whether to typecast on the reader or writer. The second question is much easier to answer so let me start there: I would cast on the writer. Why? While the difference is subtle, you have somewhat different behavior inside the object if you cast on the reader. For example if you have ...


1

Here's another way that does not use define_method. class Class def my_initialize(*vars) str = "def initialize(*args) raise ArgumentError if args.size != #{vars.size} #{vars}.zip(args).each do |var, arg| instance_variable_set(\"@\#{var}\", arg) end end" class_eval str end end ...


1

Here is a somewhat working cascade in Rebol. It won't work with op! datatype--i.e. +, *--but it will work with add and multiply. You may want to check out the higher order functions script to see some other examples. I haven't had time to write cascade2 yet cascade: func [ times [integer!] f [any-function!] partial-args [series!] last-arg ...


1

Why not use a variable like "int class_type" in base class. Then you can set the class_type value in every derived class. class Base{ int class_type; public: void something(); }; class Derived: public Base{ ... Derived(){ class_type = derived_class_type /*Some enumerated value*/; } }; void Base::something(){ std::cout << ...


1

Why not simply use an instance variable initialized at creation time? class User < ActiveRecord::Base validates :phone, presence: true, if: :phone_required? @phone_required = false def self.create_with_phone(params) obj = self.create(params) obj.phone_required = true end private def phone_required=(v) @phone_required = v end ...


1

You should think about why you want to do it this way. I would argue it is even worse than using the observer pattern. You are violating the principle of least surprise (also called principle of least astonishment). Imagine that this is a larger project and I come as a new developer to this project. I am debugging an issue where a Post does not save ...


1

There's no need to call it through module, I mean SomeHelper.send(field). All these methods are somewhat instance methods, so it is enough to use just send(field). This problem is more elaborated here.


1

I got the same issue to retrieve method name in view file. I got the solution by params[:action] # it will return method's name if you want to get controller's name then params[:controller] # it will return you controller's name


1

This isn't a direct answer to your question, but if you're just looking to mark particular Boolean instances, could you use a marker property instead of an interface? For example: Boolean.metaClass.marked = false // establish the marker property mb = new Boolean(false) mb.marked = true ub = new Boolean(false) assert mb.marked assert ub.marked == false


1

No, you can't do that. The code you have shown there is attempting to mix an interface into a per-instance metaClass, which you can't do. You also can't do it even if you try to mix the interface into the Boolean.metaClass, as opposed to the instance specific metaClass that you attempted to use. Even if you could do that, the particular example doesn't ...


1

Loop unrolloing using meta-programming can be used to create constexpr (I have not measured times). I have an example where it can be used to make the function combination(n, k) a cosntexpr: template <size_t N> struct iterate_forward { template <class operation> static auto eval(const operation & op) { ...


1

This should do it. class Dummy def stuff self.class.send(:define_method, :final_value) do my_method end end def my_method 10.5 end def final_value 0 end end dummy = Dummy.new dummy.stuff dummy.final_value #=> 10.5 The purpose of the method stuff is to change the method final_value to: def final_value my_method ...



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