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3

That code has two distinct paths through the function: one that corresponds to arg > 0 being true and the other corresponding to it being false. The number of return statements involved does not affect that, since it does not change the number of distinct paths through the function. Your code could be rewritten as int foo(int arg) { int retval = ...


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The point of Halstead's metrics is to answer a lot of questions like "How difficult is the code to read", "How much effort was put into writing the code", etc. The formula for Halstead's Difficulty metric should provide a hint on how the first question answered: Difficulty = (Unique Operators / 2) * (Operands / Unique Operands); You can see that having ...


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Have a look at "complete latency" in the spout, that is the value the tuples spend in average inside in your topology, it had decreed. So, What I understand is it should be low if I increase the number of executors.As the parallelism should increase as the executor increases. it means you have now 4 units processing tuples, each unit process 1 tuple at ...


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I had to instantiate the servlet explicit and provide a servlet mapping path as follows: @Bean public ServletRegistrationBean servletRegistrationBean(){ return new ServletRegistrationBean(new AdminServlet(),"/metrics/admin/*"); }


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Your cyclomatic complexity would be 2, here's why: Your code is essentially this: int foo(int arg) { int out; if (arg > 0) out = 1; else out = 0; return out; } plain return statement dont count toward complexity. You only have 1 if statement, no if else statements. Hence, your cyclomatic ...


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My mistake. I sent data to 2003 port, but it's only for plain text. You should use 2004 port if using pickle protocol, like mentioned here.


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The SourceMeter command line tool provides you cyclomatic complexity and other 60+ metrics in the form of CSV files. Using it is as simple as running your compiler, and because it is EDG-based, it can handle all wide spread dialects of C++, supporting also the newest C++11 and C++14 standards. Try it out, it is free.


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With the EDG-based SourceMeter for C/C++ tool you can analyze any C/C++ project, and for your needs it provides CSV files containing functions/methods with many metrics (among others size metrics you are looking for) and also the containing module (e.g. library, shared object, executable). Using a spreadsheet editor you can easily find the biggest ...


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They are memory mapped files so their size is the same of a memory page. Being 0 terminated, you can use the classic unix utilities to manage them


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If you are using Spring and Metrics you should also be using @RyanTenney's Metrics-Spring module. It will simplify your Java config and make your Metrics usage much cleaner. Take a look at the code behind the MetricsServlet and HealthCheckServlet. In my opinion its easier to just write your own Spring Controller to do the same thing than to figure out how ...


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The total size of the indexes (.MYI files) for all your MyISAM tables is 128KB (kilobytes). Hence key_buffer_size = 600M (megabytes) is overkill.



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