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32

I recently fixed this bug in Guile 2.0. The bug came into existence when C compilers started optimizing out overflow checks, on the theory that if a signed integer overflow occurs then the behavior is unspecified and thus the compiler can do whatever it likes.


20

Install the readline wrapper: brew install rlwrap Once installed, rlwrap scheme will give you persistent history, paren matching, and tab completion. I typically use rlwrap with the following arguments: -r Put all words seen on in- and output on the completion list. -c Complete filenames -f Specify a list of words to use for tab completion. I'm using an ...


10

I could reproduce the problem with guile 2.0.6 on OS X. It boils down to: > (* 4294967296 4294967296) $1 = 0 My guess is that guile uses the native int type to store small numbers, and then switches to a bignums, backed by GNU MP when the native ints are too small. Maybe in that particular case, the check fails, and the computation overflows the native ...


9

In Scheme (function-name arguments) is the syntax for applying a function to the given arguments. So (x) means "apply the function x to no arguments". However x is not a function, which the compiler is trying to tell you by saying that it's not "applicable". Since you don't actually want to apply x, simply remove the parentheses around it. Same for (y) in ...


7

Chris already pointed out that you tried to use Scheme code with a Common Lisp swank server. You need to run a Scheme swank server (e.g. swank-mit-scheme.scm, also included in Slimv). Normally Slimv should autodetect MIT scheme on Linux without any tweaking in the .vimrc. For the autodetection to work properly you need MIT Scheme installed and the scheme ...


7

Let's think of it like this: Too generate a infinite stream of integers, we would want to do (define (integers-starting-from n) (cons-stream n (integers-starting-from (+ n 1)))) This would like something like this (for starting with n=1): (+1 +2 +3 +4 +5 ...) Now, let's assume that we take all the elements from the second place, and invert their ...


6

'() should work. Basically, nil in scheme is the empty list, so quoting an empty list gives you nil.


5

As Mimisbrunnr points out, the idea here is not to string-append and then eval. For one thing, this won't work for longer sequences of a's and d's. Instead, you want to write a function that consumes a string and returns a function by analyzing the string character-by-character. In HtDP parlance, this could be done as structural recursion on a list of ...


5

You might try pp (define (display-hi) (display "Hi")) (pp display-hi) => (named-lambda (display-hi) (display "Hi")) MIT-Scheme debugging aids


5

You can't resize a vector after its creation, so vector-append! can not be implemented as an in-place operation. What you can do, is create a new vector with size equal to the sum of all the subvectors' sizes, where the elements in all subvectors will be copied one after the other. Use vector-grow as the starting procedure, and work from there. You'll have ...


4

The problem is that in the first version, (left-branch m) and (right-branch m) is called before you check whether or not m represents a mobile. i.e. m can be a number, or nil.


4

Try this instead: (define (count2-iter1 num) (define (loop idx) (if (> idx num) #t (begin ; notice the difference! (display idx) (loop (+ idx 1))))) (loop 1)) Here's why: when you use an if, there can be only one expression in the consequent part and one in the alternative part. If more than one expression is ...


4

Let's take a quick detour from the original problem to something slightly related. Say that you're given the following: you want to write an evaluator that takes "string-building" expressions like (* 3 "hello") and "evaluates" it to "hellohellohello". Other examples that we'd like to make work include things like (+ "rock" (+ (* 5 "p") "aper")) ==> ...


4

There are some interesting debugging tools described on this page: Debugging Aids. From the short experiment I tried, I think you can use the pp function to inspect the source of a compound procedure object: 1 ]=> (define (sum-squares x y) (+ (* x x) (* y y))) ;Value: sum-squares 1 ]=> (sum-squares 3) ;The procedure #[compound-procedure 13 ...


4

C-h f local-set-key local-set-key is an interactive compiled Lisp function in subr.el. (local-set-key KEY COMMAND) ...snip... The binding goes in the current buffer's local map, which in most cases is shared with all other buffers in the same major mode. So when you add local-set-key to your init file, the binding is made in whatever ...


4

In the first example, you have something equivalent to this: (define cell (cons 'x null)) (define q (cons cell cell)) As you can see, there's only one cons cell with x at the car position, that is being shared in two different parts of the resulting list structure. When you execute (set-car! (cdr q) 'y) the x in the single cell gets replaced by y in all ...


4

The most friendly Scheme environment these days is Dr Racket, which you can get from http://racket-lang.org/. It provides a graphical IDE on top of Racket, which supports many variations of Scheme. To use Dr Racket with SICP, first open Dr Racket and then replace the first line that says something like #lang scheme with #lang planet neil/sicp Then ...


4

But Ctrl + x Ctrl + r open a file in read-only mode. Don't send any buffer to GNU/MIT-scheme interpreter. You need to use M + o instead of. It will send the current buffer to GNU/MIT-scheme interpreter or M + z which send the current expression to evulation. What I did to have my GNU/MIT-scheme working: downloaded the xscheme.el file; copyed this file to ...


4

JavaScript is fully interpreted, so it has full function definitions lying around even after you've defined them. Scheme is not actually fully interpreted; it compiles functions (and a few other constructs, I think) down to a non-readable representation and throws away the initial code. You could probably get it to store the initial textual representation ...


4

It looks like this manual contains documentation of each individual function, but full out examples of every function do not appear to exist in any documentation online. The only way I was able to find working code was to Google the actual function names and arduously review each result for possible code samples. Anyway, to satisfy your question and give ...


4

If I understand your question correctly, another idiomatic way to do this in Racket would be to use a module. This module could be defined using a separate file: ;; foo.rkt #lang racket (define (bar n) (+ n n)) (define foo (bar 1)) (provide foo) ;; use-foo.rkt #lang racket (require "foo.rkt") foo Or via a module form within one file: #lang racket ...


3

foo1 is also equivalent to the following: (define foo1 (let () (define (bar n) (+ n n)) (bar 1))) Is that more acceptable-looking to you?


3

Currently your code is doing this: ((acc 's 'withdraw) 2) ((dispatch 's 'withdraw) 2) ("INVALID PASSWORD" 2) => TypeError: The object "INVALID PASSWORD" is not applicable. You have to handle the case where the password entered is wrong. Because you can't do anything useful with the account if the password is incorrect, you should signal an error and ...


3

unbind-variable seems to do the trick: 1 ]=> (+ 1 2) ;Value: 3 1 ]=> (define (+ a b) "nonsense") ;Value: + 1 ]=> (+ 1 2) ;Value 2: "nonsense" 1 ]=> (unbind-variable (the-environment) '+) ;Value: #t 1 ]=> (+ 1 2) ;Value: 3


3

There is the history. visit http://web.archive.org/web/20070808004043/http://wiki.wordaligned.org/sicp/published/FrequentlyAskedQuestions Original(broken): http://wiki.wordaligned.org/sicp/published/FrequentlyAskedQuestions Text from the above FAQ (in case of Internet Archive breakage): Why isn’t “nil” working? The quick answer is: nil is no longer ...


3

You ask: "Now how can I link between "cadr" with cadr. First we can link the characters #\a to car and #\d to cdr: (define (x->cxr x) (if (eqv? x #\a) car cdr)) Example: > ((x->cxr #\a) '(foo bar)) 'foo Then use the fact that cadr is the composition of car and cdr (as in cadr is (compose car cdr). (define (cxr s) (apply compose ...


3

How about something like this ? (define (clone-env env) (let ((bindings (environment-bindings env))) (make-top-level-environment (map car bindings) (map cadr bindings)))) 1 ]=> (define foo 1) ;Value: foo 1 ]=> (eq? (the-environment) (clone-env (the-environment))) ;Value: #f Edited to add: I'm not exactly ...


3

You can install MIT Scheme through Macports, and it will probably take a long time (it's compiling it from source, I think). You can also get a precompiled binary from here which will install an MIT-Scheme.app which starts Edwin an Emacs port or something which includes a Scheme debugger and REPL. But you can also start it from the command line. Check to ...


3

This is a little late, but for anyone stumbling on this later: You can use load/suppress-loading-message? e.g. doing a (set! load/suppress-loading-message? #t) will turn off the loading message. In your case, you should try --eval "(set! load/suppress-loading-message? #t)"


3

Firstly, you should learn to use quasiquotation, so your macro is easier to read. Like this: (define-macro (my-when test . branch) `(if ,test (begin ,@branch))) More seriously, though, this is pretty easy to write using syntax-rules, and you really should vastly prefer it over define-macro. (define-syntax-rule (my-when test branch ...) (if test ...



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