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65

Use the default date function. $var = "20/04/2012"; echo date("Y-m-d", strtotime($var) ); EDIT I just tested it, and somehow, PHP doesn't work well with dd/mm/yyyy format. Here's another solution. $var = '20/04/2012'; $date = str_replace('/', '-', $var); echo date('Y-m-d', strtotime($date));


56

I assume you are using ISO 8601 week numbers, and want the first day of a ISO 8601 week so that e.g. Week 1 of 2011 returns January 3 2011. strtotime can do this out of the box using the {YYYY}W{WW} format: echo date("Y-m-d", strtotime("2011W01")); // 2011-01-03 Note that the week number needs to be two digits. Shamefully, DateTime::createFromFormat, ...


46

Today, using PHP's DateTime objects is better: <?php $ddate = "2012-10-18"; $date = new DateTime($ddate); $week = $date->format("W"); echo "Weeknummer: $week"; It's because in mktime(), it goes like this: mktime(hour, minute, second, month, day, year); Hence, your order is wrong. <?php $ddate = "2012-10-18"; $duedt = explode("-", $ddate); ...


28

Try Using DateTime::createFromFormat http://www.php.net/manual/en/datetime.createfromformat.php $date = DateTime::createFromFormat('d/m/Y', "24/04/2012"); echo $date->format('Y-m-d'); Output 2012-04-24


26

You just have to calculate the number of seconds between the two dates, then divide to get days : $numDays = abs($smallestTimestamp - $biggestTimestamp)/60/60/24; Then, you can use a for loop to retrieve the dates : $numDays = abs($smallestTimestamp - $biggestTimestamp)/60/60/24; for ($i = 1; $i < $numDays; $i++) { echo date('Y m d', ...


25

$date_string = "2012-10-18"; echo "Weeknummer: " . date("W", strtotime($date_string));


20

Try echo date('n', strtotime('November')); // returns 11 If you have to do this often, you might consider using an array that has these values hardcoded: $months = array( 1 => 'January', 2 => 'February', 3 => 'March', 4 => 'April', 5 => 'May', 6 => 'June', 7 => 'July', 8 => 'August', 9 ...


17

If you have PHP 5.3: $date = DateTime::createFromFormat('d/m/Y H:i:s', '03/05/2011 16:33:00'); echo $date->getTimestamp();


13

MySQL: You can do in query: select curdate() PHP echo date('Y-m-d'); If you want to pass your own date format: echo date('Y-m-d', strtotime($your_date));


13

Try this: for ($m=1; $m<=12; $m++) { $month = date('F', mktime(0,0,0,$m, 1, date('Y'))); echo $month. '<br>'; }


13

wont this work? echo date("d m Y",strtotime('monday this week'));


12

tm_mon is zero-based, so you attempted to set February 31st, which got normalized. Here's a link to the definition of mktime().


10

How about strtotime(): date('Y-m-d', strtotime('+3 days'));


10

mktime() is doing what it's supposed to do. Quoting the C standard: The mktime function converts the broken-down time, expressed as local time, in the structure pointed to by timeptr into a calendar time value with the same encoding as that of the values returned by the time function. The original values of the tm_wday and tm_yday components of ...


9

"As of PHP 5.1, when called with no arguments, mktime() throws an E_STRICT notice: use the time() function instead." http://php.net/manual/en/function.mktime.php If you want to use dates/times, I recommend DateTime instead.


8

Here's how to do it in a cool way, with special thanks to strtotime's relative formats. $friday = strtotime('Next Friday', time()); $saturday = strtotime('Next Saturday', time()); $friday = strtotime('+1 Week', $friday); $saturday = strtotime('+1 Week', $saturday); Of course you should tweak it to do exactly what you want, but that's beside the point I ...


8

Here's another solution not using date(). not so smart:) $var = '20/04/2012'; echo implode("-", array_reverse(explode("/", $var)));


8

Integer literals starting with 0.. are in octal notation. 08 in octal or above does not exist, you're getting entirely wrong values. The value for the fifth day is 5, not 05 and so on.


7

What about using strtotime() to convert November to a timestamp, and, then, the date() function with the n format to get the corresponding number : $ts = strtotime('november'); echo date('n', $ts); Gives the following output : 11 And, just for fun, a portion of code such as the following one : $months = array('January', 'February', 'March', 'April', ...


7

As the error says, you either need to specify a timezone using date_default_timezone_set('Antarctica/Macquarie'); or ini_set('date.timezone', 'Antarctica/Macquarie'); in your code or define date.timezone in php.ini.


7

This gets the job done correctly: echo date('Y-m-01 - Y-m-t', strtotime('previous month')); Here is the proof: http://ideone.com/L82ZW


7

use php's date function ... http://php.net/manual/en/function.date.php date("W", $yourdate)


7

Months are same for every year $array = array("January", "February",.....); for ($m=0; $m<12; $m++) { echo $array[$m]. '<br>'; }


7

2012 - 1970 computes to 42. And year 1942 is before 1/1/1970. That is normal that mktime() result into a negative timestamp though. from mktime man page: tm_year The number of years since 1900. change your year calculation to 2012 - 1900 and you should be fine.


7

Your machine thinks that there was a daylight savings transition between midnight on 15th March 1984 and midnight on 17th March 1984, given that the difference between 448326000.0 and 448156800.0 is 47 hours, not 48. But so far as I can tell, no such transition occurred on that day in France. And I'm not sure how you fix your OS's interpretation of historic ...


7

Aha! Mystery solved (since OP finally figured out the time zone "at fault"). I found this: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/timezone.html?n=60&syear=1980 1980 No time changes 1981 No time changes 1982 No time changes 1983 No time changes 1984 Time zone change on Friday, March 16, 1984 at 1:00:00 AM 1985 Time zone ...


7

That is never going to work, since it's by definition outside the epoch, which is the start for Unix time. The manual page states: The ctime(), gmtime() and localtime() functions all take an argument of data type time_t which represents calendar time. When interpreted as an absolute time value, it represents the number of seconds elapsed since the Epoch, ...


6

This would be a way to do it: $dateString = '2010-02'; list($year, $month) = explode('-', $dateString); $timeStamp = mktime(0, 0, 0, $month, 1, $year); echo date('F, Y', $timestamp); Another way would be: $dateString = '2010-02'; $timestamp = strtotime($dateString . '-01'); echo date('F, Y', $timestamp); strtotime can't handle ambiguous dates like ...


6

There is a MySQL function unix_timestamp. In your SQL query, instead of selecting the Datetime or Timestamp column directly, do this: SELECT unix_timestamp(MyDatetimeColumn) FROM MyTable Alternatively, if you have the string already, you could use the PHP function strtotime().


6

Try with the DateTime class: $date = new DateTime("1234-01-01"); echo $date->format("M-d-Y"); // outputs Jan-01-1234 The DateTime class is available since PHP 5.2. If you have PHP 5.3, use DateTime::createFromFormat: $date = DateTime::createFromFormat('Y-m-d', "1234-01-01"); echo $date->format("M-d-Y");



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