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285

Take a look at the mockito API docs. As the linked document mentions (Point # 12) you can use any of the doThrow(),doAnswer(),doNothing(),doReturn() family of methods from mockito framework to mock void methods. For example Mockito.doThrow(new Exception()).when(instance).methodName(); or if you want to combine it with follow-up behavior ...


251

I've had good success using Mockito. When I tried learning about JMock and EasyMock, I found the learning curve to be a bit steep (though maybe that's just me). I like Mockito because of its simple and clean syntax that I was able to grasp pretty quickly. The minimal syntax is designed to support the common cases very well, although the few times I needed ...


188

Foreword There are several definitions of objects, that are not real. The general term is test double. This term encompasses: dummy, fake, stub, mock. Reference According to Martin Fowler's article: Dummy objects are passed around but never actually used. Usually they are just used to fill parameter lists. Fake objects actually have working ...


162

I believe the biggest distinction is that a stub you have already written with predetermined behavior. So you would have a class that implements the dependency (abstract class or interface most likely) you are faking for testing purposes and the methods would just be stubbed out with set responses. They wouldn't do anything fancy and you would have already ...


157

I think it should be verify(mockBar, times(2)).doSomething(...) Sample from mockito javadoc: ArgumentCaptor<Person> peopleCaptor = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(Person.class); verify(mock, times(2)).doSomething(peopleCaptor.capture()); List<Person> capturedPeople = peopleCaptor.getAllValues(); assertEquals("John", capturedPeople.get(0).getName()); ...


149

This should work verify(bar).DoStuff(any(Foo[].class));


147

You can get some information : From Martin Fowler about Mock and Stub Fake objects actually have working implementations, but usually take some shortcut which makes them not suitable for production Stubs provide canned answers to calls made during the test, usually not responding at all to anything outside what's programmed in for the test. Stubs may also ...


144

HttpContext.Current returns an instance of System.Web.HttpContext, which does not extend System.Web.HttpContextBase. HttpContextBase was added later to address HttpContext being difficult to mock. The two classes are basically unrelated (HttpContextWrapper is used as an adapter between them). Fortunately, HttpContext itself is fakeable just enough for you ...


140

The following suggestion let's you test abstract classes without creating a "real" subclass - the Mock is the subclass. use Mockito.mock(My.class, Mockito.CALLS_REAL_METHODS), then mock any abstract methods that are invoked. Example: public abstract class My { public Result methodUnderTest() { ... } protected abstract void methodIDontCareAbout(); } ...


130

You could also Stub Consecutive Calls (#10 in 1.8.5 api). In this case, you would use multiple ThenReturn statements. import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals; import static org.mockito.Mockito.mock; import static org.mockito.Mockito.when; import org.junit.Before; import org.junit.Test; public class TestClass { private Foo mockFoo; @Before public ...


119

How about when( method-call ).thenReturn( value1, value2, value3 ); You can put as many arguments as you like in the brackets of thenReturn, provided they're all the correct type. The first value will be returned the first time the method is called, then the second answer, and so on. The last value will be returned repeatedly once all the other values ...


112

You must use doThrow(new Exception()).when(mockedObject).methodReturningVoid(...); and not doThrow(new Exception()).when(mockedObject.methodReturningVoid(...)); This is explained in the documentation


104

Using Moq: var request = new Mock<HttpRequestBase>(); // Not working - IsAjaxRequest() is static extension method and cannot be mocked // request.Setup(x => x.IsAjaxRequest()).Returns(true /* or false */); // use this request.SetupGet(x => x.Headers).Returns( new System.Net.WebHeaderCollection { {"X-Requested-With", "XMLHttpRequest"} ...


102

New feature added to Mockito makes this even easier, ArgumentCaptor<Person> argument = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(Person.class); verify(mock).doSomething(argument.capture()); assertEquals("John", argument.getValue().getName()); Take a look at Mockito documentation


101

It seems the only way to do is to use a mock location provider. You have to enable mock locations in the development panel in your settings and add <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_MOCK_LOCATION" /> to your manifest. Now you can go in your code and create your own mock location provider and set the location of this ...


96

Another way to solve this is to do the following: controller.Request = new HttpRequestMessage(); controller.Request.Properties.Add(HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration()); If you are upgrading to webapi 5.0, then you'll need to change this to: controller.Request = new HttpRequestMessage(); controller.Request.SetConfiguration(new ...


94

Prologue: If you look up the noun mock in the dictionary you will find that one of the definitions of the word is something made as an imitation. Mocking is primarily used in unit testing. An object under test may have dependencies on other (complex) objects. To isolate the behavior of the object you want to test you replace the other objects by mocks ...


93

Generally speaking, a DI Container should not be necessary for unit testing because unit testing is all about separating responsibilities. Consider a class that uses Constructor Injection public MyClass(IMyDependency dep) { } In your entire application, it may be that there's a huge dependency graph hidden behind IMyDependency, but in a unit test, you ...


92

As per this ... Put simply there is a difference between Mock and Stub objects and RhinoMocks recognizes that allowing us to write tests that better state their purpose. Mock objects are used to define expectations i.e: In this scenario I expect method A() to be called with such and such parameters. Mocks record and verify such ...


90

Since you say you are new to unit testing and asked for mock objects in "layman's terms", I'll try a layman's example. Unit Testing Imagine unit testing for this system: cook <- waiter <- customer Its generally easy to envision testing a low-level component like the cook: cook <- test driver The test driver simply orders different dishes and ...


88

Thanks to those that responded over the last few weeks. I ended up writing a blog post about my findings, since I had to do so much digging that it seemed like I might as well summarize them in the hopes of helping others. The chart I posted organizes my findings: One caveat, which I touched on in the blog post, is that the chart is useful for checking ...


84

Stub is simple fake object. It just makes sure test runs smoothly. Mock is smarter stub. You verify Your test passes through it.


79

It.IsAny / It.Is These can be useful when you're passing a new reference type within the code under test. For instance if you had a method along the lines of:- public void CreatePerson(string name, int age) { Person person = new Person(name, age); _personRepository.Add(person); } You might want to check the add method has been called on the ...


77

I'd say the competition is between JMockit and PowerMock, then Mockito. I'd leave "plain" jMock and EasyMock because they use only proxy & CGLIB and do not use Java 5 instrumentation like the newer frameworks. jMock also didn't have a stable release for over 4 years. jMock 2.6.0 required 2 years to go from RC1 to RC2, and then another 2 years before it ...


76

You don't need to mock it. If you already have a controller you can add a model state error when initializing your test: // arrange _controllerUnderTest.ModelState.AddModelError("key", "error message"); // act // Now call the controller action and it will // enter the (!ModelState.IsValid) condition var actual = _controllerUnderTest.Index();


76

In the codeschool.com course, Rails Testing for Zombies, they give this definition of the terms: Stub For replacing a method with code that returns a specified result. Mock A stub with an assertion that the method gets called. So as Sean Copenhaver described in his answer, the difference is that mocks set expectations (i.e. make assertions, ...


74

If I understand what you want to do correctly, you should be able to use andAnswer(): mockObject.someMethod(eq(param1), eq(param2)); expectLastCall().andAnswer(new IAnswer() { public Object answer() { //supply your mock implementation here... SomeClass arg1 = (SomeClass) getCurrentArguments()[0]; AnotherClass arg2 = ...


73

You can use a lambda with an input parameter, like so: .Returns((string myval) => { return myval; }); Or slightly more readable: .Returns<string>(x => x);


72

I am the creator of PowerMock so obviously I must recommend that! :-) PowerMock extends both EasyMock and Mockito with the ability to mock static methods, final and even private methods. The EasyMock support is complete, but the Mockito plugin needs some more work. We are planning to add JMock support as well. PowerMock is not intended to replace other ...


71

This was solved by specifying an empty configuration: request.Properties.Add(HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration()); I got the answer to that from here ASP.NET WebApi unit testing with Request.CreateResponse



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