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23

Mock Retrofit 2.0 Requests for Testing As the old mechanisms like creating MockClient class and implementing it from Client are not working anymore with Retrofit 2.0, here I describe a new way of doing that. All what you need to do now is to add your custom interceptors for OkHttpClient like it is shown below. FakeInterceptor class just overrides intercept ...


18

I am surprised that this question has been around for so long and nobody has as yet provided an answer based on Roy Osherove's "The Art of Unit Testing". In "3.1 Introducing stubs" defines a stub as: A stub is a controllable replacement for an existing dependency (or collaborator) in the system. By using a stub, you can test your code without ...


17

Installed mock==1.0.1 and that worked for some reason. (shrugs) edit: The real fix for me was to updated setuptools to the latest and it allowed me to upgrade mock and six to the latest. I was on setuptools 3.3. In my case I also had to remove said modules by hand because they were owned by OS in '/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/' check versions of ...


13

I encountered the same issue on my mac, which I was able to fix by realizing that my python's sys.path contained both /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/Extras/lib/python/ and /Library/Python/2.7/site-packages/ with the former earlier than the latter. You can test if this is happening to you by running the following in the ...


11

Since Java 8 and the introduction of target typing you can use the argument-less any method and the type argument will get inferred by the compiler: verify(bar).doStuff(any()); This doesn't work with primitive types, unfortunately: public interface IBar { void doPrimitiveStuff(int i); } verify(bar).doPrimitiveStuff(any()); // Compiles but throws ...


11

I thought Mihail Davydenkov's comment deserved to be an answer: You can also use subject.run_callbacks(:commit). Also note that this issue (commit callbacks not getting called in transactional tests) should be fixed in rails 5.0+ so you may wish to make a note to remove any workarounds you may use in the meantime when you upgrade. See: ...


10

I found two issues that prevent the finish callback from being executed. serve-static uses send module which is used to create file readstream from the path and pipe it to res object. But that module uses on-finished module which checks if finished attribute is set to false in response object, otherwise it destroys the file readstream. So filestream never ...


10

[EDIT] Maybe the most interesting part of this question is Why I cannot patch somefunction.__call__? Because the function don't use __call__'s code but __call__ (a method-wrapper object) use function's code. I don't find any well sourced documentation about that, but I can prove it (Python2.7): >>> def f(): ... return "f" ... >>> ...


9

Since you mentioned you don't want to use any other framework, you are only leaving yourself one option: uopz uopz is a black magic extension of the runkit-and-scary-stuff genre, intended to help with QA infrastructure. uopz_flags is a function that can modify the flags of functions, methods and classes. <?php final class Test {} /** ZEND_ACC_CLASS is ...


8

I know that there is already an accepted answer but there is simpler solution for that problem - mocking the print in python 2.x. Answer is in the mock library tutorial: http://www.voidspace.org.uk/python/mock/patch.html and it is: >>> from StringIO import StringIO >>> def foo(): ... print 'Something' ... >>> ...


8

The accepted answer doesn't really mock the Date.getTimezoneOffset method, instead it expects you to use a different method with the same name. It won't work on Date objects themselves and as Carl Meyer points out, it won't work for libraries like MomentJS. A better way is to override the getTimezoneOffset method on the Date prototype, so that all ...


8

Below are a collection of native testing frameworks you could use for testing in your Swift projects. CatchingFire - Test Library for Swift's Error Handling. DVR - A simple network testing framework for Swift. Fakery - Swift fake data generator. Mockingjay - An elegant library for stubbing HTTP requests with ease in Swift. OHHTTPStubs - A testing library ...


8

As previously pointed out almost all of the calls are chainable. So you could call when(mock.method()).thenReturn(foo).thenReturn(bar).thenThrow(new Exception("test")); //OR if you're mocking a void method and/or using spy instead of mock doReturn(foo).doReturn(bar).doThrow(new Exception("Test").when(mock).method(); More info in Mockito's Documenation. ...


8

This is indeed a limitation of Mockito, and it is referenced in their FAQ: Can I thenReturn() an inlined mock()? Unfortunately you cannot do this: when(m.foo()).thenReturn(mock(Foo.class)); // ^ The reason is that detecting unfinished stubbing wouldn't work if we allow above construct. We consider is as a 'trade off' ...


8

This specification: @Grab('org.spockframework:spock-core:1.0-groovy-2.4') @Grab('cglib:cglib-nodep:3.1') import spock.lang.* class Test extends Specification { def 'lol'() { given: def s = Mock(String) { size() >> 10 } expect: s.size() == 10 } } ends with the following ...


7

Since class A is mocked, all method invocations wont go to the actual object. Thats why your second assert fails (i guess it might have returned 0). Solution: You could do something like when(test.b()).thenCallRealMethod(); else you could spy like A test = spy(new A()); Mockito.when(test.a()).thenReturn(35); assertEquals(35,test.a()); ...


7

When you test using class inherits unittest.TestCase you can simply use methods like: assertTrue assertFalse assertEqual and similar (in python documentation you find the rest). In your example we can simply assert if mock_method.called property is False, which means that method was not called. import unittest from unittest import mock import ...


7

According to docs : Foo mock = mock(Foo.class, CALLS_REAL_METHODS); // this calls the real implementation of Foo.getSomething() value = mock.getSomething(); when(mock.getSomething()).thenReturn(fakeValue); // now fakeValue is returned value = mock.getSomething();


6

In addition to the response @Matti John you can also use patch inside function test_write_out: from mock import MagicMock, patch def test_write_out(): path = '~/collection' with patch('__builtin__.open') as mock_open, \ patch('cPickle.dump') as mock_pickle: f = mock_open.return_value ...


6

I totally agree with @Holden on that! Mocking RDDS is difficult; executing your unit tests in a local Spark context is preferred, as recommended in the programming guide. I know this may not technically be a unit test, but it is hopefully close enough. Unit Testing Spark is friendly to unit testing with any popular unit test framework. Simply ...


6

@fkreusch's answer works great until you use the new RSpec expect() syntax (3.0+) Putting this into rails_helper.rb works for me: FactoryGirl::SyntaxRunner.class_eval do include RSpec::Mocks::ExampleMethods end In the OP's example, you can now do: FactoryGirl.define do factory :cimg_for_testing_tags do ... # Factory attributes ...


6

No, autospeccing cannot mock out attributes set in the __init__ method of the original class (or in any other method). It can only mock out static attributes, everything that can be found on the class. Otherwise, the mock would have to create an instance of the class you tried to replace with a mock in the first place, which is not a good idea (think ...


6

You can either create a namespace or create a stub instance using sinon.createStubInstance (this will not invoke the constructor). Creating a namespace: const namespace = { Service: require('./service') }; describe('Service', function() { it('getData', function() { sinon.stub(namespace, 'Service').returns(0); console.log(new ...


6

That's not the correct way to use It.IsAny, which is intended to substitute a whole parameter, and not be part of one - in this case, you would use it (something) like this for an unspecified predicate: mock.Setup(m => m.FindBy(It.IsAny<Expression<Func<int, bool>>>()) As you already know that the controller method will use the ...


6

When you pathch __call__ of a function, you are setting the __call__ attribute of that instance. Python actually calls the __call__ method defined on the class. For example: >>> class A(object): ... def __call__(self): ... print 'a' ... >>> a = A() >>> a() a >>> def b(): print 'b' ... >>> b() b ...


6

I think what are you doing (frontend isolation during tests) is right, keep it this way. What you can do to verify your mocks is one of those: 1) If frontend and backend are tightly coupled and developed together - add a set of unit tests for the backend to verify API responses. This way if something changes in API, the backend tests will fail and you'll ...


6

The example you posted indeed doesn't seem to make much sense: test "mocking_an_instance_method_on_a_real_object" do person = Person.new person.expects(:save).returns(true) assert person.save end In fact the test doesn't test Person at all, it just tests that the mock works. But mocking or stubbing can makes a lot of sense: It allows you to bypass ...


5

You have to use callback method. Since line => builder.Append(line) is part of the method behavior, you have to execute this behavior when you test the method: [TestMethod] public void Test_Service_When_Passing_String_And_ActionDelegate() { var fakeReporter = new Mock<IRepeater>(); fakeReporter.Setup(x => ...


5

Without modifing class A code you won't be able to UT the ReadBlock method using moq. You'll be able to UT this method using code weaving tools(MsFakes, Typemock Isolator and etc...) For example(MsFackes): [TestMethod] public void TestMethod1() { using (ShimsContext.Create()) { ShimCloudBlockBlob.AllInstances.<the method you want to ...


5

There're three ways I'm aware of how you can mock Kotlin classes: Use interfaces instead of classes. In this case you replace all usages of a particular class with the corresponding interface. And in testing code you mock the interface. interface Something { /* ... */ } class SomethingImpl : Something { /* ... */ } fun processSomething(something: ...



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