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Unit tests serve as an additional line of defense against software bugs. Making bug in production code is likely, making same bug in both production code and unit test is a lot less likely. This is one of the reasons you write unit tests - to gain one more guarantee your software works as intended. I would inject B::foo mock and check it was called once ...


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Microsoft published a very well explained guide providing an in-memory implementation of DbSet which has a complete implemention for all the methods on DbSet. Check the article at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/dn314431.aspx#doubles


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Try to use: PowerMockito.doReturn(response).when(some, "privateMethod", anyString());


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To test method1 you just need to test it like any other method. The Object under test in this case the Singleton class should not be mocked. Create a test object i.e. your class under test (testee) usually in a setup method then: @Test public void testMethod1() { int testValue = 1; int expectedResult = 2; ...


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You can find alot of iPhone mockups here. Including wireframes. http://freeiphonemockups.blogspot.com


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The link http://www.voidspace.org.uk/python/mock/patch.html#where-to-patch helped me understand better how to go about patching function calls in python.


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You could use patch as a decorator @patch('...do_b') def test_do_a(self, mock_do_b): do_a(...) mock_do_b.assert_called_once_with(...)


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Look at the documentation of $http, in particular interceptors. This is the interesting bit: response: interceptors get called with http response object. The function is free to modify the response object or create a new one. The function needs to return the response object directly, or as a promise containing the response or a new response object. In ...


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patch.object will restore the item you patched to its original state after the test method returns. If you monkey-patch the object yourself, you need to restore the original value if that object will be used in another test. In your two examples, you are actually patching two different things. Your call to patch.object patches the class FooBar, while your ...


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I would suggest to stay away from mocking frameworks as far as possible. At the same time, I would recommend to use mock/fake objects for testing, as much as possible. The trick here is that you should create built-in fake objects together with real objects. This article explains it in details: http://www.yegor256.com/2014/09/23/built-in-fake-objects.html


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great question, I ran into a very similar problem and this stackoverflow appeared at the top of google results for me. In my case I was trying to test a code snippet that added my custom Filter to my ApplicationContext, mocking out objects where necessary. I ran into the issue that when my code called filterHolder.start(), (which is in fact the final method ...


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Try CppFreeMock and some others mentioned here.


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When you use @MockEndpoints("log:*"), the camel just create the mock endpoint for you, the mock endpoint uri should be mock:log:THE_REMAINED. You should be able to get the mock endpoint with below code: end = MockEndpoint.resolve(camelContext, "mock:log:SOME_LOG?level=INFO");


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bump was partially right, but this what I want to get is a mock cretated via reflection and solution for this will look like that: public static object DynamicMock(Type type) { var mock = typeof(Mock<>).MakeGenericType(type).GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes).Invoke(new object[] { }); return mock.GetType().GetProperties().Single(f => f.Name == ...


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I'd say move sorting logic to other class that does not know about JSF context. Then, for example, create method setSortParameter(String) and fill it in unit test and in this bean. I've had hard time playing with mock JSF contexts for a few years (using Shale framework + JSF 1.1) and I'm not going to do it any more.


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I'm using a kendo grid and therefore can't change the implementation to a getter method but I want to test around this (mocking the grid) and not test the grid itself. I was using a spy object but this doesn't support property mocking so I do this: this.$scope.ticketsGrid = { showColumn: jasmine.createSpy('showColumn'), hideColumn: ...


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Mocking h5py.File class HdfWriter(): def __init__(self,hdf_file): self.hdf_file=hdf_file def create_attrs(self,attributes): dset_name=attributes.keys()[0] attrs=attributes[dset_name] for key in attrs: self.hdf_file[dset_name].attrs[key]=attrs[key] For the purpose of the create_attrs method, ...


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If I am not mistaken, Sinon mocks wrap their associated objects, rather than directly adopting their prototype chain, which means instanceof is never going to work as you want. If you have the ability to change the unit under test, consider checking for the existence of important properties on the incoming object, rather than its prototype chain. For ...


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Another way is to create a child of your entity (this could live in the tests folder if you want to keep things clean), then add the "setId()" method to the child class TestableEntity extends \My\Namespace\Entity { public function setId($id) { $this->id = $id; return $this; } } Your tests should then test the TestableEntity, ...


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Since BeanPropertyRowMapper<T> is a generic interface, you should invoke any() like this: Mockito.when(jdbcTemplate.query(Matchers.anyString(), Matchers.<BeanPropertyRowMapper<MyClass>>any())).thenReturn(SOMELIST);


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The reference you need to patch is the 'module' attribute reference in django.core.management. Attempting to mock the package reference in the test file doesn't change the reference in django.core.management. You'll need to do something like import mock from django.core.management import call_command import django.core.management from myapp.models import ...


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I dont think you can mock it, and i seem to remember newing it up always returned null in a test context (i.e not running in IIS or IIS express). You could argue that you do not need to test framework code, you trust it works and you just want to know it was called. This is path we went down and just wrote an adapter and mocked that out, and proved that it ...


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There seems to be a problem with MockWebServer's dispatch queue, which freezes for some reason when serving responses which are not 200 or 302. I have solved this by providing a custom dispatcher: MockWebServer server = ...; final MockResponse response = new MockResponse().setResponseCode(401); server.setDispatcher(new Dispatcher() { ...


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Using the apporach posted here: Sphinx-doc :automodule: with Mock imports I just changed this line: sys.modules[mod_name] = mock.Mock() to: sys.modules[mod_name] = mock.Mock(class_that_is_extended=object) and removed 'de.xyz.class_that_is_extended' from MOCK_MODULES


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PowerMockRunner is part of powermock-module-junit4.jar. You need to explicity import this jar You could specify the dependency for this jar as per your requirement. Refer http://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.powermock/powermock-module-junit4


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var request = new Mock<HttpRequestBase>(MockBehavior.Strict); var moqRequestContext = new Mock<RequestContext>(MockBehavior.Strict); request.SetupGet<RequestContext>(r => r.RequestContext).Returns(moqRequestContext.Object); var routeData = new RouteData(); routeData.Values.Add("key1", "value1"); ...


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Recently had the same problem and stumbled upon this, Jon Skeets answer helped me identify the problem, however there's a much simpler solution than editing the in the *.tt files, if you go to the designer you can call your entity/class/model something else than system while still having a table called system. For me changing the table name was not an ...


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As you normally would, by using reflection: Field f = ABC.class.getDeclaredField("test"); f.setAccessible(true); f.set(abc, new MyType()); This is not related to mocking and therefore nothing a mocking framework would target in its API. You should consider to refactor for testing.


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There is a very obvious way to replace the built-in input function. Just insert two lines at the beginning of the part you dedicated to testing: if __name__=='__main__': import random input = lambda s: random.randint(1, 12) print(delicious_prize(2)) print(delicious_prize(0)) print(delicious_prize(-3)) print(delicious_prize('wqete')) ...


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I would rather replace sys.stdin when you are doing the testing: import StringIO import sys sys.stdin = StringIO.StringIO("1000\n") num = input("some number: ") print("\nread %d from input" % num) Step through the example above at https://dbgr.cc/4u#autoPlay=true


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Another way to feed data to a program that's expecting console input is to use input redirection You just put the data you want to input into a plain text file (eg data.txt), with one input string per line, and then you can do: python myprog.py < data.txt There are variations on this theme, eg feeding the output of one program into the input of ...


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As quamrana suggested in a comment, you can pass your own input function as parameter. import random def test(x, input=input): # input function, defaults to the built-in one v=input("Your input: ") print v==x results = (3, 4) def ran(s): i = random.choice(results) print s+str(i) return i test(3, ran) test(4, ran) test(4) Output ...


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You can replace the input() function with your own. A dedicated package for doing this during testing is part of the Python standard library: unittest.mock. In your test you'd mock input() and have it return specific values, or entirely random values: if __name__=='__main__': from unittest import mock with mock.patch('__main__.input', create=True) ...


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You can pass arguments to set_up method so it can configure the mock as needed: function set_up($someMethodReturnValue = 1) { $mock = $this->getMockBuilder('SomeClass') ->disableOriginalConstructor() // This is necessary in actual program ->getMock(); $mock->expects($this->any()) ->method('someMethod') ...


2

Try using the VCR gem, it records HTTP request for you, the first time you run your tests. For subsequent tests VCR uses the previously recorded HTTP response. This should solve your timeout errors and allow you to work with external API's more easily. Checkout these resources for more info: https://www.relishapp.com/vcr/vcr/docs ...


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This is a known issue and the only way to get it working is to extract the methods into a module and include it in your view helpers and the controller. More information at: https://github.com/rspec/rspec-rails/issues/1076


0

You patch for input does not work as required because you are not giving it a function. Try this: import unittest from unittest.mock import patch, MagicMock import io import sys from Run import main class MyTestCase(unittest.TestCase): #@patch('builtins.input', side_effects=['y','1']) @patch('builtins.input', MagicMock(side_effect=['y','1'])) ...


0

Print("String", file=out) Is what you're looking for, you'll need to pass out to main though.


0

There is also Mocketry which provides a nice DSL


0

You don't mock implementation details, you mock values so that you can get to a point in your code that you need to test. There's no point in writing a test that tests whether a mocked dependency outputs a value, then you're just testing moq. Ex: public class Stuff { IFoo _foo; IBar _bar; public Stuff(IFoo foo, IBar bar){ _foo = foo; ...


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I wonder in this case then if you're looking for Behavior tests. Here's a sample in Machine.Fakes with the Moq sublayer ... it allows for the nesting it seems like you're wanting, while still maintaining logical separation of the tests. Requires NuGet packages: Machine.Fakes.Moq, Machine.Specifications.Should class IFoo_test_context : ...


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BabyMock2 provides nice visualizations. There is a Fosdem video of it


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mock_open() is the way to go; you patch open in your code-under-test with the result of a mock_open() call: mocked_open = unittest.mock.mock_open(read_data='file contents\nas needed\n') with unittest.mock.patch('yourmodule.open', mocked_open, create=True): # tests calling your code; the open function will use the mocked_open object The patch() context ...


0

You need to call the method in your class using static::doCurlRequest(). staticExpects uses late static binding to create the mock. Because of this, the method needs to be called via static rather than self or $this-> which will call the actual method. Your class needs to look like this: class MyClass{ public static function create($data){ ...


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Rather than trying to override mocked methods, I find it easier to override the mocked objects themselves. For example: class ThingTest extends \PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase public function setUp() { $this->initFoo(); $this->initBar(); } public function testOne() { // Uses default [method => value] map for ...


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In case of Moq framework - setup method is STUB where as Verify method is Mock


0

I have seen others use Factory Girl for mocking backend. You can see the readme at http://rubydoc.info/gems/factory_girl/file/GETTING_STARTED.md Or you could have a look at http://mock-server.com/ and see if that could help you out.


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It was this easy :-/ In the test: public void setup() throws Exception { ConfigurableBeanFactory factory = (ConfigurableBeanFactory) wac.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory(); factory.registerScope("session", new SessionScope()); } Then you call that before every test that needs it. Could just use @Before if you are using JUnit.


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You can write an Answer to provide an arbitrary implementation for a mock method. doAnswer(new Answer<Void>()) { @Override public Void answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable { Op argument = (Op) invocation.getArguments()[0]; // Your code here argument.operationId = 123456; return null; } ...



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