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0

For JDBC based project (directly or indirectly, e.g. JPA, EJB, ...) you can mockup not the entire database (in such case it would be better to use a test db on a real RDBMS), but only mockup at JDBC level. Advantage is abstraction which comes with that way, as JDBC data (result set, update count, warning, ...) are the same whatever is the backend: your prod ...


0

I just ran into the same issue - my solution was to use express-session's memorystore option (the default when no other is specified), rather than mongodb. Really quickly, I just did this: if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'test') { app.use(session({ secret: config.sessionSecret })); } else { app.use(session({ secret: config.sessionSecret, ...


0

This is sort of like using a Mockito spy in Java. http://docs.mockito.googlecode.com/hg/latest/org/mockito/Spy.html You can construct a "spy" using the Mock(spec=obj) constructor which will make the __class__ attribute equal to ClassUnderTest where the Mock(wraps=obj) constructor will not. Since in python class methods take the a class instance, the self ...


0

To the bean definition that is expected to mock FileSerivce, add the name identifier to @Bean: @Bean(name="mockfileService") or similar. Then, when you will only need to add the @Qualifier annotation to the classes using the mock version of the bean: @Autowired @Qualifier("mockfileService") FileService fileService; Basically, if you are going to have two ...


0

I fixed it in the following way: @mock.patch('tumblrip_new.os.path') @mock.patch('tumblrip_new.os') def test_create_new_user_dir(self, mock_os, mock_path): """Creates a directory if one does not exist.""" t = tum.Tumblr("username") # directory does not exist: mock_path.isdir.return_value=False t.set_path() ...


1

You can add data to the @ContextConfiguration annotation, for instance a specific Configuration to load. Alternatively, you can add the @Qualifier annotation to the FileService in TestClass2 and force an instance of FileService with a given name to be used. So for instance, if your real FileService bean were called "fileServiceImpl", in MyTestClass2, you ...


1

On the question of "am I attempting to do too much in one function", I think the answer is no, you are testing a single unit here and it looks impossible to break the complexity down further - the complexity of the test is simply a result of the complex environmental setup required for your function. In fact I applaud your effort, most would look at that ...


3

You are mocking wrong method. Mock Get: employeeRepository.Setup(x => x.Get()).Returns(new[] { employee }); Mock is a fake object, it doesn't have any logic in methods. You have to tell it how exactly it should behave (setup) so that in your test this behavior can be replayed.


1

Your problem sounds very much like Issue 326 - Argument Constraints should support derived types as Type Arguments, which was recently fixed in FakeItEasy release 1.22.0. If you're not using that release, please upgrade and see if the behaviour persists. If you are using 1.22.0, please come back and comment so we can keep trying!


0

Another possibility: Checking call_count individually on restricted methods Ensure that call_count is zero on methods that should not be called. class TestAlgorithm(unittest.TestCase): def test_algorithm(self): actionMock = mock.create_autospec(Action) self.assertTrue(algorithm(actionMock)) ...


3

Don't mock Sum. Getters and setters in general don't have logic. Mocking is the process of removing a class's logic so that it doesn't interfere with another class's tests. Mocking a class without any logic, or a class whose logic is not involved with the current test is pointless. In fact, "don't mock value objects" is a well known principle of unit ...


2

But if this is the case and indeed it is an Integration Test, then how can I write an Unit Test for ValudateMethod's validate()? Simply by (...) mocking Sum, so it alwas returns the same value. The line between integration and unit is often hard to draw. But let's try to do that, starting with: Integration tests will test interactions between ...


0

I just spent long time trying to figure out the easiest way to do it with moq, below is a copy past of my code that actually worked for me : var _adminctrl = new Moq.Mock<AdminController>(); //AdminController is my MVC controller var mock = new Mock<ControllerContext>(); mock.Object.Controller = _adminctrl.Object; mock.Setup(p => ...


1

Its not pretty, but I've been using this: begin do_something rescue SystemExit => e expect(e.status).to eq 1 # exited with failure status # or expect(e.status).to eq 0 # exited with success status else expect(true).eq false # this should never happen end


0

In this case, what you really want is to mock the IdGenerator dependency, which happens to be called from a @PrePersist method. Using JMockit, the test can be written as follows: @Test public void createOrder() { new MockUp<IdGenerator>() { // change as needed... @Mock int getNewId() { return 123; } }; MiniOrder order = ...


0

You can certainly do this, especially if you combine it with a bit of swizzling. I have recently done this. EDIT - the below bit is no longer true. I used to use OCMock, but it doesn't work properly with ARC and weak references: http://joris.kluivers.nl/blog/2012/03/26/weak-references-to-nsproxy-with-arc/ because of an iOS bug whereby a weak reference to ...


2

You're not invoking against your mock, but rather the real class. You need to generate a mock, and then invoke on that mock. Try something like: MyClass mock = mock(MyClass.class); // I'm using the methods rather than annotation here mock.myMethod(); and assert on that. I'm not quite sure in the above where runThis() is, though. If it's on a contained ...


0

You could simplify those dependencies. For example, replace them by interfaces. class Suicide { IIrrelevantObject n; IObjectsThatGetInitializedWhoTheFKnowsWhere m; If those interfaces don't exist, create them! Then you just have to let your test inject mock of those interfaces. There are several ways you can do this: Add setter (potentially call ...


1

A slight tweak to Carsten's answer, which is already very thorough. When you create your own class, extend the Client class and implement the interface, like this: (assuming the "Client" class is not sealed, in which case this wouldn't work) public class DerivedClient : Client, IClient { public DerivedClient(string portNum) : base(portNum) {} } ...


5

The comment says it all - you cannot mock in this way. What you can do: 1. setup a (lean) interface with all you need: public interface IClient { public void Init(); public void SendMsg(byte[] msg); public byte[] Receive(); } 2. make a facade around client to implement it: public class MyClient : IClient { private Client _client; /* ...


1

As you pointed out, it is not possible to mock static methods with Mockito and since you do not wanna use Powermock or other tools, you can try something as follows in your tests. Create test authentication object Authentication auth = new ... // create instance based on your needs and with required attributes or just mock it if you do not care Mock ...


2

As @PatrickQuirk pointed out, I think your problem is due to what InMemoryDbSet does under the covers. Regarding the "Am I approaching this right ?" part : If, as I suspect, your Repository exposes some kind of IDbSet, it's probably a leaky abstraction. The contract of an IDbSet is far too specific for what a typical Repository client wants to do with the ...


0

You may find this easier to do using MagicMocks instead of patches, something along these lines should help: from mock import MagicMock fake_foo_response = 'foo' fake_bar_response = 'bar' class FooTestCase(unittest.TestCase): def setUp(self): self.foo = Foo() self.foo.get_foo = MagicMock(return_value=fake_foo_response) ...


1

Looks like it's not supported out of the box. However there are at least two approaches on how to achieve the same result. Passing list of allowed members According to mock documentation spec: This can be either a list of strings or an existing object (a class or instance) that acts as the specification for the mock object. If you pass in an object ...


0

I was looking for the solution of the same problem. So far the best result I was able to achieve is this: public class MyObjectControllerTest{ private final MyObjectDAO dao = mock(MyObjectDAO.class); private final MyObjectController controller = new MyObjectController(dao); public static FakeApplication fakeApplication; @BeforeClass ...


0

Try verification with timeout. verify(mock, timeout(1000)).myMethod(params); You could also run on a synchronous executor in your test only using executeOnExecutor, but then you introduce some test-centric code into your production component, and stray further from testing the actual implementation you want. Timeouts are probably the easiest way to get ...


0

Yes, this is possible using the spec= and autospec= arguments. See the mock documentation on Autospeccing for more information. In your example it would become: action_mock = mock.Mock(spec=Action) or: action_mock = mock.Mock('Action', autospec=True)


0

First I would advise to have a look here: How to mock a static final variable using JUnit, EasyMock or PowerMock In general, to fix your issue you can go with this: Mockito.when(getUI().getResourceX()).thenReturn(whatYouNeed);


1

change lines order in your specs: you should place should_receive before calling assigning it 'should trigger callback' do person.should_receive(:send_communication_preference_update).with(pref.first) person.preferences = pref end


1

You have to set up the should_receive before the method you want to test is called.


1

So we know that decorator order matters and none of these work: @it.should('do something') @mock.patch('datetime.date') @mock.patch('datetime.time') def test_1(date, time, case): pass @mock.patch('datetime.time') @mock.patch('datetime.date') @it.should('do something') def test_2(case, date, time): pass because of the way patch and should are ...


0

I know this answer is rather late, but I feel for future viewers of this question there now exists a simpler solution (which has some drawbacks, but depending on your needs can be much easier to implement). Mockery has support for mocking pre-existing objects with what they call a "proxied partial mock." They say that this is for classes with final methods, ...


0

I've faced the same problem while trying to run your code, so I included file with classes (A and B) to the test class. It helped me overcome this problem.


0

I agree with Bryan, that you don't need mock here since you want to test your implementation of category method. As example: -(void)testAppropriateColorWithBlackShouldReturnWhiteColor { UIColor *appropriateColor = [color appropriateTextColorForBackground:black]; assertThat(appropriateColor, is(equalTo([UIColor whiteColor]))); } You also probably ...


0

According to Juliemr in this post: https://github.com/angular/protractor/issues/509 " the code that is run in the mockedModule is run in a separate context from the test. One is in the browser, one is in the node.js process running the test " Therefore I changed two things in the code: 1 - Put declaration of "mockedValue" inside "it()". ...


3

The package you reference you are using for your InMemoryDataSet uses a static backing data structure, and so will persist across test runs. This is why you're seeing the inconsistent behaviors. You can get around this by using another package (as you mention), or pass in a new HashSet to the constructor in every test so it doesn't use a static member. As ...


0

The short answer is that, unless you make value publicly accessible (by changing its access modifier or providing a getter method), you can't test that this() is called. However, you shouldn't really be checking that this() is called. Your tests should define the behaviour of the class by observing changes in its state, or the changes it makes on other ...


0

Using a standalone main() method test, public static void main(String[] args) { A a = new A("Hello"); assert(a.value == 100); } I noticed that your code here threw a NullPointerException this.superParam.concat(additionalParam); And, while irrelevant to testing the this(), you should assign the result of that operation (which you must do explicitly ...


1

Whatever is in your [SetUp] method will be called for each test. This is probably behavior that you don't want. You can either place the code you have in the [SetUp] method inside each individual test, or you can create a separate private method within your unit test class that will spin up a freshly mocked DbSet for you to keep things DRY.


2

There are a couple of things wrong with the metaClass approach that you tried. The where method is static so instead of this: MyModel.metaClass.where = { return [myModel1, myModel2] } Use something like this: MyModel.metaClass.static.where = { return [myModel1, myModel2] } Another thing that is wrong with that is you have the where method ...


-1

You can use org.junit.rules.TemporaryFolder from the JUnit package: The TemporaryFolder Rule allows creation of files and folders that are guaranteed to be deleted when the test method finishes (whether it passes or fails): Example: final TemporaryFolder testFolder = new TemporaryFolder(); testFolder.create(); final Path filePath = ...


0

I think your problems are due to your test structure. I've found it difficult to mix mocking with the traditional method of implementing interfaces in the test class (as you've done here). If you implement the listener as a Mock you can then verify the interaction. Listener listener = mock(Listener.class); w.addListener(listener); world.doAction(..); ...


0

Got it! The correct syntax looks like this: allow(point).to receive(:coords=).and_return([4,2]) The stub method is apparently deprecated.


0

A decorator is a function that takes a function as argument, and returns a decorated version. Background Your case is confusing, because it contains a lot of nesting. Let's first refresh the syntax of decorators: When we write: @decorator def fun(): pass This is equivalent to: def fun(): pass fun = decorator(fun) In your example, the retry ...


0

You should not test the retry decorator at the delete function, but with a test function, that tests the retry decorator. def test_retry(self): @retry(exceptions=ValueError, delay=1, tries=5, backoff=2) def test_raise_wrong_exception(): raise AssertionError() self.assertRaises(AssertionError, test_raise_wrong_exception) ...


0

Asked around and was pointed to this: https://jersey.java.net/documentation/latest/test-framework.html. Along with some additional explanation: It is slightly different from RESTEasy. You can directly invoke REST resource methods to test rest endpoints. To inject Jersey-specific objects (@Context, @HttpServletRequest, etc.), use JMockit. Or run an inline ...


0

If you are running standalone, you should make sure that your json file is in src/test/resources/__files


1

I don't know if it is the best solution but I managed redefining the previous class with a different parent using type(). I built a function called patch_parent(), that returns the class with a parent mock: from contextlib import contextmanager @contextmanager def patch_parent(class_): """ Mock the bases """ yield type(class_.__name__, ...


0

Since you can't modify the code under test. I think there isn't a perfect solution. You need to partially mock the Example instance. List list = new LinkedList(); List spy = spy(list); //You have to use doReturn() for stubbing doReturn("foo").when(spy).get(0); but you can't do this since you have to instantiate your object at first. So i propose the ...


3

You can with a PowerMockito spy: public class A { public boolean testableMethod() { return getMode() == 1; } private int getMode() { return 5; } } import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue; import static org.powermock.api.mockito.PowerMockito.doReturn; import static org.powermock.api.mockito.PowerMockito.spy; import ...



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