Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

There is more than one possible argument matcher and one is eq, which is mentioned in the exception message. Use: verify(function, times(1)).doSomething(eq(arg1), any(Argument2.class)); (static imports supposed to be there -- eq() is Matchers.eq()). You also have same() (which does reference equality, ie ==), and more generally you can write your own ...


0

Try adding testOptions { unitTests.returnDefaultValues = true } in your build.gradle More info here http://tools.android.com/tech-docs/unit-testing-support


1

I would not use a mock for Writer. You want to test that the output gets written, not the interaction that causes the output to get written. Instead, use a real object: HttpServletResponse mockResponse = context.mock(HttpServletResponse.class); StringWriter writer = new StringWriter(); ... atLeast(1).of(mockResponse).getWriter(); ...


1

Well, the this is already answered in the thread you mentioned: Mocks.register is meant to be used in a purely single-threaded, no-job-executor, "unit test" environment. In such an environment, instead of setting the time and waiting for the job executor to process the jobs, you need to explicitly trigger the timer job in your own testing thread: ...


0

The typical strategy for doging static methods that you have no way of avoiding using is by creating wrapped objects and using the wrapper objects instead. The wrapper objects become facades to the real static classes, and you do not test those. A wrapper object could be something like public class Slf4jMdcWrapper{ public static final Slf4jMdcWrapper ...


0

I think I might've found the answer to how to mock future that work with map operation. Seems like if we create a 'successful' Future, it will work as follows: val mockUserSession = createTestUserSession val mockUserSessionList = mock[List[UserSession]] val mockUserSessionListFuture = Future.successful[List[UserSession]](mockUserSessionList) ...


2

The fact that your job is scheduled is not relevant to your testing of the functionality. You're not testing the scheduling framework, you're testing your own business logic. Therefore unit testing becomes simple: @Inject private ScheduledJob job; @Test public void testLogic() { //Do whatever testing you need... job.doWork(); } You'll know ...


1

Just realized that to do that I need to add the class I want to mock inside the annotation @PrepareForTest.


0

You can use PowerMock to test final methods: Use the @RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class) annotation at the class-level of the test case. Use the @PrepareForTest(ClassWithFinal.class) annotation at the class-level of the test case. Use PowerMock.createMock(ClassWithFinal.class) to create a mock object for all methods of this class (let's call it mockObject). ...


0

An alternative solution is to add the mock object to the Spring context before Spring wires everything together, so that it will have already been injected before your tests begin. The modified test might look something like this: @RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class) @ContextConfiguration(classes = { Application.class, MockConfiguration.class }) public ...


1

For any curious, I wound up moving the subscribers to another class and then using Observable.just("Test") to trigger the method on subscription and verifying it was called.


3

You need 2 mock objects. HttpServletResponse resp = context.mock(HttpServletResponse.class); Writer writer = context.mock(Writer.class); ... atLeast(1).of(resp).getWriter(); will(returnValue(writer)); allowing(writer).write(with(any(String.class));


1

You should matcher that matches long not any object: verify(foo, times(1)).causeProblems(anyLong()); I checked that it runs correctly.


0

From PowerMock's Getting Started Page: PowerMock consists of two extension API's. One for EasyMock and one for Mockito. To use PowerMock you need to depend on one of these API's as well as a test framework. Currently PowerMock supports JUnit and TestNG. If you are using PowerMock and its Mockito extension API, you will also depend on Mockito—and these ...


0

As far as I know, you are trying to replace the spring bean with a mock version. In that case you have to annotate the method that produces your mock with the annotation @Primary, so Spring could choose the mock object by default in each autowired field (of course if it doesn't have any qualifier). If you're trying to use a Spring context in your test that ...


1

This is because Spring create a proxy around your bean. Try to not inject mock using Spring @RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class) @ContextConfiguration(classes = {TestContext.class, WebAppConfig.class}) @WebAppConfiguration public class NotificacaoControllerTest { private MockMvc mockMvc; private NotificacaoRepository notificacaoRepositoryMock; ...


2

I suggest to not do it this way. Your private method should not retrieve the singleton factory object using a static method. Static stuff breaks "easy" mocking; forces you to use "power" mocking; and thereby, creates more problems than it solves. Change your code to use dependency injection. Do something like this: class YourClass { private final ...


0

Don't mock types you don't own Really it's wrong 99% of the time. Instead it will be better to use real objects or use integration tests (with RESTAssured, or something else). On the mockito wiki : Don't mock types you don't own ! This is not a hard line, but crossing this line may have repercussions! (it most likely will.) Imagine code that ...


1

you need to use thenReturn and not then: when(mockUriInfo.getRequestUri()).thenReturn(new URI(url)); if you want to use then (that is a synonym of thenAnswer you need to pass an answer as parameter : when(mockUriInfo.getRequestUri()).then(new Answer<Integer>() { public URI answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable { return ...


2

You won't be able to pass multiple arguments annotated with @RequestBody annotation. The argument annotated with this annotation holds the whole request body and it can't be split into multiple. What you can do is to have a wrapper to hold your Deal and Owner objects and you can pass that wrapper as a single request body argument. For e.g.: public class ...


0

After looking at your code I found the problem When using spy we need to use doAnswer.(new Answer<T>() {..}).when(spy).method() And NOT !!! when(spy.method()).thenAnswer(new Answer<T>() {..}) Thanks


2

As stated in the offical documentation, it is possible and sometimes even advised: Important gotcha on spying real objects! Sometimes it's impossible or impractical to use when(Object) for stubbing spies. Therefore when using spies please consider doReturn|Answer|Throw() family of methods for stubbing. But, once again as the doc states: ...


0

For the future readers of this post here is a great blog that covers all the issues and solutions


4

Just make your base class abstract


0

You are trying to mock ProductService, but when your controller calls ProductService.getProduct(int), it is creating its own new instance. You would need to make the ProductService a class variable and pass the mocked ProductService into the controller method to test. You could add a setter method for the datasource in your controller class and pass a ...


1

Try just... when(mockBuilder.post(any(), anyObject())) .thenReturn(mockResponse); There have been some changes to Java 8 generics, for example Java 8: Generic type inference improvements


0

You need to prepare the class for test! @PrepareForTest(MyFinalClass.class)


0

First of all, I don't think you have integrated any technology (guice, spring, etc) implementing inversion of control (dependency injection) concept and annotation @Inject works only if there's dependency injection feature in the application.


0

Well, the only way I know to deal with this situations, without changing your application code, using PowerMock. It can instrument the JVM and creates mocks not only for static methods but also when you call new operator. Take a look at this example: https://code.google.com/p/powermock/wiki/MockConstructor If you want to use Mockito, you have to use ...


0

Not sure why the response.getStatus() method would return 0 instead of 200 and >even the response.getContentType() is returning null. Because response is a mock, when you call getStatus(), getContentType() or any other method on response you will get: The programmed behaviour if you programmed some behaviour with Mockito.when(... or Mockito.doXXX( The ...


0

Add the following javax.servlet-api dependency resolved the issue. pom.xml updated <dependency> <groupId>javax</groupId> <artifactId>javaee-web-api</artifactId> <version>7.0</version> <scope>provided</scope> </dependency> <dependency> ...


0

I found what was wrong. Here is fixed part of the code @RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class) @SpringApplicationConfiguration(classes = Application.class) @WebAppConfiguration @ActiveProfiles(profiles = "test") public class TransactionsTest { private MockMvc mockMvc; @Autowired private WebApplicationContext context; @Mock private Currency currency; ...


0

You have not finished the expectation... PowerMockito.doAnswer(new Answer<Void>() { ... }).when(testLog.class); // << here!! Also, testLog.class is a "Class" object - don't you really mean just "testLog"? I don't think very nice things will happen if you try and PowerMock the Class class.


3

An array is a final class in java, so it cannot be mocked. What you might have to do is fill up the array with mocks yourself, for example... // Lose the @Mock annotation if that's how you set it up private List<CountModel>[][] counted; @Before @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") public void setup() { counted = new List[X_SIZE][Y_SIZE]; for(int ...


1

Mockito isn't good at matching generics itself, but your solution is much easier than the general case. Replace your: Matchers.<ParameterizedTypeReference<SearchResultsDTO<SolrDocumentDTO>>>any()) with: eq(new ParameterizedTypeReference<SearchResultsDTO<SolrDocumentDTO>>() {})) First of all, Matchers.any() doesn't match ...


1

Ah, I'm an idiot. Turns out the method I was trying to mock was final and I didn't notice that originally. It was from a super class and I assumed it was not final. Methods that are final cannot be overridden and Mockito cannot mock them. Here's a better example: class A extends D { ... } class D { //Can't mock this. final Object getObj() { ...


0

I rewritten some of the code and in the end I used: PaymentDetails paymentDetails = (PaymentDetails) context.getConversationScope().get("paymentDetails"); and in my test: @Mock private RequestContext context; @Mock private MutableAttributeMap attMap; private PaymentDetails paymentDetails = new PaymentDetails(); // CODE HERE @Before public void ...


0

Actually, you can have a better usage about Mockito: @RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class) public class ExampleTest { @Mock public Connection connectionMock; }


4

You need another mock... connectionMock.createStatement() ...will return null unless you set up an expectation for it. For example, add... @Mock private Statement statement; ... when(connectionMock.createStatement()).thenReturn(statement); when(statement.executeQuery(sql)).thenAnswer(...); Update To answer the comment below, you should be returning ...


0

You should not mock values, instead you may want to have builders to make those object fast.


1

Since the save method is not static, you will have to change when(NotificacaoRepository.save( added )).thenReturn(added); To use an object as: when(notificacaoRepositoryMock.save( added )).thenReturn(added);


0

You can do this with a custom matcher. Warning: Be reasonable with using complicated argument matching, especially custom argument matchers, as it can make the test less readable. Sometimes it's better to implement equals() for arguments that are passed to mocks (Mockito naturally uses equals() for argument matching). This can make the test cleaner. ...


0

You need to make your action class use your mock object. Use either a setter or the @InjectMocks annotation to put that object into your action class.


0

Not sure whether this will work; code is lacking to tell whether this will do the trick but maybe you can try this: final C c = spy(new B()); final A a = spy(new A()); doReturn(c).when(a).getObj(); A more complete answer requires a more complete question ;)


0

Mocking taskModel.getSelectedLib() is pretty straight-forward since it returns a value. You can do that by putting the following at the beginning of your test: when(mockTaskModel.getSelectedLib()).thenReturn(aLib); There is no point in mocking the setContent method though, since it does not return anything. The best thing you can do is verify that the ...


1

Thanks, this is probably a bug, I've created the report on GH-188. Not sure when it will be fixed though.


2

I don't think you need to use the @Autowired annotation. I usually just use the @Mock


1

try this doAnswer(new Answer() { @Override public Object answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) { ByteArrayOutputStream baos = (ByteArrayOutputStream) invocation.getArguments()[0]; // fill it here return null; }}).when(client).retrieveFile(baos);


3

You can use Mockitos Answer. doAnswer(new Answer() { Object answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) { Object[] args = invocation.getArguments(); ByteArrayOutputStream baos = (ByteArrayOutputStream)args[0]; //fill baos with data return null; } }).when(client).retrieveFile(baos); However, if you have possibility to ...


0

You call getPackageName(); on the Context-mock. To get this running you have to mock the method like: Mockito.when(mock.getPackageName()).thenReturn("myPackage"); But this makes your test pretty much useless. But thinking about this, this isn't a test which I would write because (assuming it works as you expecting it) it just tests the framework method ...



Top 50 recent answers are included