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9

As of July 26, 2014, I don't believe mod_perl is dead. The mod_perl source code can be found at: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/perl/modperl/trunk/ The source code revisions log shows commits as recently as 6 weeks ago related to Apache 2.4. In addition, the mod_perl users mailing list's archives can be found at: ...


8

mod_perl 2.0.8 (latest stable) won't cut it--it's unaware of the deprecation of MPM_NAME in apache 2.4.x Download the latest dev via svn: svn checkout https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/perl/modperl/trunk/ mod_perl-2.0 The Changes file lists this version as 2.0.9-dev Xcode 6.01 won't cut it--it's apache headers will make mod_perl think you're running ...


6

Write your website using Plack or a framework built on top of Plack (such as Catalyst or Dancer/Dancer2). You then have several options to deploy the website. You can deploy it as a CGI script (easy to do, but inefficient), or using FastCGI or Apache's mod_perl, or forget Apache altogether and use a standalone Perl web server such as Starman. Apache's ...


6

First thing to be aware of is that you don't want to care about the deployment of your app. So don't think about mod_perl, FCGI or anything like that. Instead, write your app to the PSGI specification and then you'll be able to deploy it into any environment you want. Most (probably all) modern Perl web frameworks have built-in PSGI support. So if you write ...


5

The Plack module, which implements the Perl Web Server Gateway Interface (PSGI) is popular for good reason. It presents a standard API that allows a Perl web application to run on old CGI, FastCGI, mod_perl, and others, or it can behave as a stand-alone web server on its own. I can't offer any benchmark figures, but I will update this answer if I find ...


4

If you want calculate the PI in your C/CGI script to several thousand places, probably yes, because of calculation speed of compiled probram is much faster. But, If your C/CGI will output only "hello world" probably not. :) Result: impossible to say without some benchmarks and indepth analysis what causes the slowness. What you should do? Only IMHO :) ...


4

The CGI perl module is a way of interfacing with a webserver. It does the job it was always intended to, but it's been superseded by an assortment of frameworks for web development. It has been removed from the perl core: The rational for this decision is that CGI.pm is no longer considered good practice for developing web applications, including quick ...


4

Since the problem is with superfluous spaces in your fields, you should split like this instead split /\s*:\s*/, $line That way the spaces will be removed if there are any, but the split will still work fine if not.


3

I use perl primarily for sysadmin support. So that's mostly - run lots of stuff on lots of servers type tasks, and the odd 'web page' front end. I've been porting recently away from CGI towards Mojolicous with an nginx reverse proxy on the front end. The reason I picked it up in all honesty, because I liked the name (And any system that includes servers ...


3

This is a simplified version of Dan Deal's answer, with a few notes for less experienced developers. You'll need to install Xcode 6.1 from the Mac App Store. Xcode is suite of tools developed by Apple for developing iOS and OS X software. It takes up almost 6gb but can be deleted after this installation. Start Xcode once to agree to Apple's terms. In ...


2

So based on comments the answer here is - it's an RHEL 7 feature. https://securityblog.redhat.com/2014/04/09/new-red-hat-enterprise-linux-7-security-feature-privatetmp/ PrivateTmp= Takes a boolean argument. If true sets up a new file system namespace for the executed processes and mounts a private /tmp directory inside it, that is not ...


2

You can put this sort of logic in a startup file. This file will be executed on Apache (re)start. In your Apache config: PerlPostConfigRequire /home/httpd/perl/lib/startup.pl More info at http://perl.apache.org/docs/2.0/user/handlers/server.html#Startup_File


2

ModPerl 2? You can use $r->status_line("511 Network Authentication Requred") and then return Apache2::Const::OK (0) See: http://perl.apache.org/docs/2.0/api/Apache2/RequestRec.html#C_status_line_


1

open3 redirects the file descriptor associated with STDOUT, excepting it to be fd 1 (what the program you exec will consider STDOUT). But it's not 1. It doesn't even have a file descriptor associated with it! I consider this a bug in open3. I think you can work around it as follows: local *STDOUT; open(STDOUT, '>&=', 1) or die $!; ...open3...


1

You can use Apache2::RequestUtil. package Common; use Apache2::RequestRec; use Apache2::RequestUtil; sub subroutine_that_also_logs { my $r = Apache2::RequestUtil->request; # some process you want using $r } If this phase is PerlFixupHandler, $r has whole request information e.g. MIME-type and so on. If you use this method, you have to write ...


1

Look at Apache2::SubProcess. When you're running external processes within a mod_perl handler, Apache memory, I/O and process management come into play. Remember, your code is running within Apache itself and is subject to the Apache environment. The Apache2::SubProcess module is designed to make exec()- and system()-style calls work properly under within ...


1

I approach these problems through process of elimination. If a deployment isn't fully successful, I want to know how it differs from fully successful deployments. I would begin by examining the versions of Perl dependencies. Different distributions might include different versions of non-core modules. If your deployment procedure includes pulling ...


1

If you place huge hash data on mod_perl memory, then mod_perl parent process reads it at server startup phase. In first, you create Your/HugeData.pm on @INC directory. package Your::HugeData; our %dictionary = ( .... ); Next, apache process reads this on startup. # In apache.conf (or anywhere apache config file) PerlModule Your::HugeData Then ...


1

$r->handler('proxy-server'); means that Apache httpd server response phase takes mod_proxy (not mod_perl). If you catch this mod_proxy processed HTTP return code, then you can write PerlLogHandler or PerlClenaupHandler module after response phase for catch it. # PerlLogHandler Your::CatchStatusCode package Your::CatchStatusCode; use strict; use ...


1

RESOLUTION As often happens the problem was of my own making. One of the kind monks at perlmonks.org pointed out that the Perl handler contained the line: $query = new CGI; Removing that did it. Since I was in fact only accessing but not changing anything there was no point to it and in fact $query was never used.



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