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15

the first error indicates that ggplot2 cannot find the variable 'count', which is used in formula, in data. Stats take place after mapping, that is, size -> x, and counts -> y. Here is an example for using nls in geom_smooth: ggplot(data=myhist, aes(x=size, y=counts)) + geom_point() + geom_smooth(method="nls", formula = y ~ N * dnorm(x, m, s), se=F, ...


11

The bottom line here is that @Roland is absolutely right, this is a very ill-posed problem, and you shouldn't necessarily expect to get reliable answers. Below I've cleaned up the code in a few small ways (this is just aesthetic) changed the ResidFun to return residuals, not squared residuals. (The former is correct, but this doesn't make very much ...


8

A quick way of finding the elbow is to draw a line from the first to the last point of the curve and then find the data point that is farthest away from that line. This is of course somewhat dependent on the number of points you have in the flat part of the line, but if you test the same number of parameters each time, it should come out reasonably ok. ...


6

First, you might want to look at FAdist package. However, that is not so hard to go from rweibull3 to rweibull: > rweibull3 function (n, shape, scale = 1, thres = 0) thres + rweibull(n, shape, scale) <environment: namespace:FAdist> and similarly from dweibull3 to dweibull > dweibull3 function (x, shape, scale = 1, thres = 0, log = FALSE) ...


6

Matlab has a built in function: [mu,sigma] = normfit(data) But I don't see why you think it is Gaussian distribution - look at the histogram:


6

I would begin by an explantory plots, something like this : x<-c(0.108,0.111,0.113,0.116,0.118,0.121,0.123,0.126,0.128,0.131,0.133,0.136) y<-c(-6.908,-6.620,-5.681,-5.165,-4.690,-4.646,-3.979,-3.755,-3.564,-3.558,-3.272,-3.073) dat <- data.frame(y=y,x=x) library(latticeExtra) library(grid) xyplot(y ~ x,data=dat,par.settings = ggplot2like(), ...


6

I really suspect that you are doing the same online course as I do -- the following allows you to get the right answers. If the task at hand is not very computationally heavy (and it isn't in the course), then we can sidestep all the smart details of the step function, and just try all the subsets of the predictors. For each subset we can calculate AIC as ...


5

Here's a simple, effective, but perhaps somewhat naive approach. First make sure you make a generic interpolator through both functions. That way you can evaluate both functions in between the given data points. I used a cubic-splines interpolator, since that seems general enough for the type of smooth functions you provided (and does not require ...


5

The point of information theoretic model selection is that it already accounts for the number of parameters. Therefore, there is no need to find an elbow, you need only find the minimum. Finding the elbow of the curve is only relevant when using fit. Even then the method that you choose to select the elbow is in a sense setting a penalty for the number of ...


5

For each f(x), take the absolute value of f(x) and normalize it such that it can be considered a probability mass function over its support. Calculate the expected value E[x] and variance of Var[x]. Then, we have that E[a x + b] = a E[x] + b Var[a x + b] = a^2 Var[x] Use the above equations and the known values of E[x] and Var[x] to calculate a and b. ...


3

Transform the gaussian function using natural logarithm to a linear equation. Find the least square solution with mldivide. bb = (T-x).^2; AA = log(y)-log(A); xx = AA\bb; sprintf('%f',sqrt(abs(xx)))


3

First, a quick calculus review: the first derivative f' of each graph represents the rate at which the function f being graphed is changing. The second derivative f'' represents the rate at which f' is changing. If f'' is small, it means that the graph is changing direction at a modest pace. But if f'' is large, it means the graph is rapidly changing ...


3

This question has been asked before: Algorithm needed for packing rectangles in a fairly optimal way A good survey, from a previous answer, is available at: http://www.csc.liv.ac.uk/~epa/surveyhtml.html


3

For the scale factor a, you can estimate it by computing the ratio of the amplitude spectra of the two signals since the Fourier transform is invariant to shift. Similarly, you can estimate the shift factor b by using the Mellin transform, which is scale invariant.


3

Here is an example of comparing five models. Due to the form of the first two models we are able to use lm to get good starting values. (Note that models using different transforms of y should not be compared so we should not use lm1 and lm2 as comparison models but only for starting values.) Now run an nls for each of the first two. After these two ...


2

This doen't only fail for fitting, also for plotting. You'll have to write down the explicit form of f(x), otherwise gnuplot will loop it until it reaches its recursion limit. One way to do it would be to use a different name: f(x) = sin(x) # for example g(x) = A*exp(x - B*f(x)) And now use g(x) to fit, rather than f(x). If you have never declared f(x), ...


2

That is a recursive function. You need a condition for the recursion to stop, like a maximum number of iterations: maxiter = 10 f(x, n) = (n > maxiter ? 0 : A*exp(x - B*f(x, n+1))) fit f(x, 0) "data.txt" via A,B Of course you must check, which value should be returned when the recursion is stopped (here I used 0)


2

Basically, you're asking for a solution to a knapsack problem. There is none optimal algorithm for a Knapsack Problem of arbitrary size, since it's NP-hard problem. There are plentiful of sub-optimal algorithms: Greedy search algorithms. Heuristic search space traveling algorithms, such as A* family Stochastic search algorithms, such as simmulated ...


2

I didn't want to try to figure out what the model you're using represented, so here's a simple example fitting to a line: x_true = arange(0,10,0.1) m_true = 2.5 b_true = 1.0 y_true = m_true*x_true + b_true def func(params, *args): x = args[0] y = args[1] m, b = params y_model = m*x+b error = y-y_model return sum(error**2) ...


2

So one way of solving this would be two fit two lines to the L of your elbow. But since there are only a few points in one portion of the curve (as I mentioned in the comment), line fitting takes a hit unless you detect which points are spaced out and interpolate between them to manufacture a more uniform series and then use RANSAC to find two lines to fit ...


2

There are a number of tools which can help you do this. I have started a list below: Excel Analysis Tool Pack Octave FreeMat R Project


2

Mathematica 8.x can use the following algorithms for NonLinearModelFit[] for its Method option: Possible settings for Method include "ConjugateGradient", "Gradient", "LevenbergMarquardt", "Newton", "NMinimize", and "QuasiNewton", with the default being Automatic. See the documentation for additional options etc. Note that NonLinearFit[] is obsolete; you ...


2

As noted your problem is most likely the starting values. There are two strategies you could use: Use brute force to find starting values. See package nls2 for a function to do this. Try to get a sensible guess for starting values. Depending on your values it could be possible to linearize the model. G = (1 / (1 + (B^2)*(R^2))^((C+1)/2)) ...


2

Suggest you walk before you run. Do you know how to fit a straight line to a set of points in R? Do you know how to do a logistic regression? Tell us what you know - don't just dump your data and say "How do I do X?". Look at the help for the lm and glm functions. Doesn't it seem perverse to use a graphical function (geom_smooth) and then try and get the ...


2

When you say you would like to fit the dataset to the uniform, I'm assuming that what you mean is that you would like to estimate the parameters of a uniform distribution that best fit your dataset. This is actually quite an interesting question. I'm not surprised that fitdist was no help as the uniform distribution is a bit of a special case. For example, ...


2

Scipy.optimize.leastsq is a convenient way to fit datas, but the work underneath is the minimization of a function. Scipy.optimize contains many minimization functions, some of then having the capacity of handling constraints. Here I explain with fmin_slsqp which I know, perhaps the others can do also; see Scipy.optimize doc fmin_slsqp requires a function ...


2

This works: all.vars(formula(Model)[-2]) ## [1] "var1" "var2" "var3" The [-2] indexing removes the response variable from the formula. However, you may be disappointed that the internally stored model frame does not have the original variables, but the transformed variables ... names(model.frame(Model)) ## [1] "Class" "addNA(var1)" "var2" ...


1

Both Rody Oldenhuis and jstarr's answers are correct. I'm adding my own answer just to sum things up, and connect between them. I've messed up Rody's code a little bit and ended up with the following: function findScaleShift load f1f2 x0 = [length(f1)/length(f2) 0]; %initial guess, can do better n=length(f1); costFunc = @(z) sum((eval_f1(z,f2,n)-f1).^2); ...


1

I am afraid you can't solve your particular problem using leastsq. leastsq is a wrap around FORTRAN library minipack, it calls MINPACK’s lmdif and lmder algorithms. Importantly, it is based on the Jacobian and the Hessian of the least squares objective function. Your target function does not have smooth derivative, due to: if(x2 + y2 <= r2): v = 20.0 ...


1

Have you considered normalizing your x points by the corresponding y values? Instead of fitting x_i1, x_i2, ..., x_i20 to y_i for all samples i you have, you may want to consider fitting x_i1/y_i, x_i2/y_2,... x_i20/y_i to 1. If you decide to do so, you need to construct a matrix X of size n-by-20 (the i-th row is the i-th sampe). Then: >> n = ...



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