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65

I figured it out. You are supposed to: Plug in the device, let the host grab it In the host, go to virtual box, and edit the configuration for the guest to use usb, and add a filter to include the plugged in device Note, you may need to install the Extension pack to enable USB 2.0 Unplug the device Start the guest os When the guest os is running, plug ...


56

In almost all android source base as found in the AOSP/CAF/CM source (Android Open Source Project, CodeAurora Forum, Cyanogenmod respectively), will have C code called the rild, (Radio Interface Layer Daemon). This is commonly found within the /hardware/ril of the source tree. This daemon runs from the moment Android boots up, and creates a socket called ...


39

Blog post Serial RS232 connections in Python import time import serial # configure the serial connections (the parameters differs on the device you are connecting to) ser = serial.Serial( port='/dev/ttyUSB1', baudrate=9600, parity=serial.PARITY_ODD, stopbits=serial.STOPBITS_TWO, bytesize=serial.SEVENBITS ) ser.open() ser.isOpen() ...


36

import serial ser = serial.Serial(0) # open first serial port print ser.portstr # check which port was really used ser.write("hello") # write a string ser.close() # close port use http://pyserial.wiki.sourceforge.net/pySerial for more examples


17

Not all modems support caller ID. And for those that do, the implementation varies between manufacturers. There caller ID is passed through the serial data so you will have to use the TAPI library (or Windows' HyperTerminal to test it). The caller ID number typically appears between the first and the second ring. You will need to issue a command to the ...


16

I do it like this with pyserial: import serial serialPort = serial.Serial(port=1,baudrate=115200,timeout=0,rtscts=0,xonxoff=0) def sendatcmd(cmd): serialPort.write('at'+cmd+'\r') print 'Loading profile...', sendatcmd('+npsda=0,2') Then I listen for an answer...


8

As an exercise I've implemented a simple V.23-like modem using FSK modulation and supporting a data rate of 1200 bits/second (960 bits/second effective because of the start and stop bits). I'm curious to see if it works with your radio. Noise, signal reflection and imperfect demodulation can all affect the performance of the modem. Prior to trying to ...


7

http://www.roman10.net/serial-port-communication-in-python/comment-page-1/#comment-1877 #!/usr/bin/python import serial, time #initialization and open the port #possible timeout values: # 1. None: wait forever, block call # 2. 0: non-blocking mode, return immediately # 3. x, x is bigger than 0, float allowed, ...


6

The modem, once configured, will show up as two USB serial ports. The first port is for initialization, dialing and data communications and the second one is for querying/monitoring. Controlling the modem through the two ports is done via AT commands. You can see how things work by opening the ports with HyperTerminal, issuing commands to them and ...


6

Yes. As long as both computers have compatible modems. You'll need terminal software for both computers (probably hyperterm for WinXP, but it's been a while, so I can't say for sure). Basically, you'll need to have one computer call the other computer sending a string like "ATDxxxxxxx" where xxxxxxx is the phone number of the receiving computer. When the ...


5

It is possible, but there are some things about it you should note: You still have to have caller ID supported by your carrier/provider. A basic POTS line won't include this information unless the carrier has done some extra work to add it. So you can't do this to avoid paying an extra caller ID fee. It's not built into .Net. You'll have to call into ...


5

WMI will contain all the information you need in the Win32_POTSModem class. In C# or .Net, you can utilize the System.Management namespace to query WMI. Within .Net, you can use MgmtclassGen.EXE from the platform SDK to generate a class object representing the WMI class. The command line would be like this: C:\Program Files\Microsoft ...


5

Yes. Assuming the modems are connected via a serial port (or emulate being connected via a serial port): you'll need one modem set up (learn your AT commands!) to listen for and answer incoming calls, and the other to dial the first. You can then treat the pair as a rather long serial link. However getting everything to work reliably is more of an art ...


5

For the SMS part you can use the open source Kannel server. It will work with GSM modems and provide an interface (HTTP) for your application to interact with it. Call wise, you are probably looking for an IVR solution. You can write the branching logic (voice menu, press 1 etc) in its language. Asterisk seems to support that but I have no experience with ...


5

To list the installed modems you can use the Win32_POTSModem WMI class Check this sample code. {$APPTYPE CONSOLE} uses SysUtils, ActiveX, ComObj, Variants; procedure GetWin32_POTSModemInfo; const WbemUser =''; WbemPassword =''; WbemComputer ='localhost'; wbemFlagForwardOnly = $00000020; var FSWbemLocator : ...


5

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5

First of all, to send sms when modem is in pdu mode, you must send these commands: AT+CMGS=<length> <CR>, where length is (length of PDU binary string - 2) / 2. When '>' symbol appears you must send your pdu and ctrl+z character (char.ConvertFromUtf32(26)). Here are some resources that may be useful: http://www.developershome.com/sms/ SMS ...


4

I don't know if there is an AT module, but you can use pyserial to communicate with a serial port.


4

You're going to need more than a modem in your PC to accomplish what you've described. Both the sump pump and your PC have modems, which are the subscriber end of a telephone "loop". The CO end (Central office in telephony terms) provides functions that you're telephone and both the modems mentioned above. A big one is the generation of a ring ... this is ...


4

It is almost certainly superfluous in your use case. Most cellular modem products are cut-down versions of products designed for use in mobile phones. Obviously, in a phone application, the TCP/IP stack is required, along with a whole pile of other functionality. A typical GPRS modem probably contains an ARM9 processor, and this is not greatly taxted ...


4

take a look at iaxmodem


4

The way we used to do it back in the olden days was with a null-modem cable. We even used to do "networked" gaming that way, back in the day. This is bascially an RS-232 cable with the receive and transmit pins crosswired. I still see some adapters around, so it shouldn't be too tough to get hold of one. Much later some people created SLIP (Serial Line IP) ...


4

I discovered runscript ("$ man runscript"), a utility that adds an expect-like scripting ability to minicom. The expect behavior is useful to me since this device uses a proprietary interactive boot sequence. It's rudimentary but sufficient. A script can be invoked when starting minicom with the "-S scriptname" flag, and specific text from within the script ...


4

I found that AT+CRSM works and also AT+CSIM.


4

Every phone has different capabilities so you should check which values for each parameter are valid for your phone by sending it a AT+CNMI=? For example my phone doesn't support your example because mode 1 is not supported. For the full syntax of +CNMI you can consult the AT Manual of your manufacturer or the ETSI standard or read this brief tutorial ...


4

It's the Hayes AT command set. Basically you're telling the modem to dial a number. AT = Attention, DT = Tone Dial, , = Pause and w is an up to 30-second (from memory) wait for at least a one-second dial tone. The digits will be dialled like in a normal telephone.


4

You can also try removing the colon next to the COMn for this to work exec("mode COM3 BAUD=9600 PARITY=N data=8 stop=1 xon=off"); $fp = fopen ("COM3", "w"); if (!$fp) { echo "Not open"; } else { echo "Open"; }


4

The latest 3GPP spec lists the command you want as +CPINR


4

You can't do it with a modem (stands for MOdulator/DEModulator). These are designed to turn digital communication into analog for transmittal down phone lines and then changing the analog signal back to digital. What you want is a voice processing card. The ones I am most familiar with are Dialogic, but that was about 10 years ago. I did a quick search ...


4

Ok folks, thank you for all your thoughts and your input. I have done some more research, and finally i realized, that in order to do what i wanted i did not have to bother with serial ports and AT-commands at all. All that was needed was to do a few Windows RAS calls. If I had just been a bit more specific in my question about what I wanted to do with my ...



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