Hot answers tagged

6

The module object is stored in sys.modules. So if you do from abc import xyz, then sys.modules['abc'] will give you the abc module object.


5

Since you don't have any packages in the repository and only have a single file named versioned.py, you should be able to import it as import versioned after running python setup.py install. Works for me: $ mkvirtualenv peewee New python executable in peewee/bin/python ... $ git clone https://github.com/kramer65/peewee-versioned Cloning into ...


5

You are exporting User as a factory function which returns an object with getAddress method on it. So you need to invoke (instantiate) User first: var useraddress = usr.User().getAddress(id, pool); Another important problem. connection.query request is asynchronous, which means that assigning getAddress result to var useraddress doesn't make sense. ...


4

That's it, you're good. Nothing matters[1] except the if __name__ == '__main__', as noted elsewhere From the docs (emphasis mine): A module’s __name__ is set equal to '__main__' when read from standard input, a script, or from an interactive prompt. A module can discover whether or not it is running in the main scope by checking its own __name__, which ...


3

The difference that can be significant and which one should be aware of is that in MODULE module1 USE module2 the module1 will by default export also all public symbols of module2. That won't happen when you use module2 in a subroutine only, because the module does not see it. So: module module2 integer int end module module module1 ...


3

Lua 5.3 has an utf8 module and it's already loaded, so require("utf8") actually doesn't do anything with the modules.


3

os.function_name tries to access the non-existent attribute literally named 'function_name' from the object os. For dynamic attribute lookup, you can use getattr. You can use the following code. import os import pydoc help_dict = {} for function_name in dir(os): help_dict[function_name] = pydoc.render_doc(getattr(os, function_name)) The help ...


3

Your find() query is preparing the data as a 'list'. in cake lists are always key => value pair arrays. so in your view when you use the second foreach loop you are saying foreach character in a string...do..... in your example $value can only be a string. foreaching it can only make $values a single char. Let me know if you still unsure what i mean. not ...


3

The answer is that one of Rails' foundational concepts is: Convention over configuration. When you decide to override the principle of Convention with Configuration, that's a Rails anti-pattern. Is it possible to to do it and be happy and have a working Rails app? Sure, but it's not code you would want to show as an example of your work on a Rails ...


3

The difference between the working and not-working code is the location of the type with the pointer attribute of the component. It's this attribute that allows a type declaration to refer to a type that has not been previously defined. Look at type type2 type(type1) :: t1 integer :: x end type type2 Here the type1 component of ...


3

According to the Python documentation, bytes and bytearray objects are sequences of integers (between 0 and 255), representing the ASCII value of single bytes I think the input needs to be like so a = b"abc" (Note the "b").


3

You could use something like: from ..helper import a See python docs on packages.


2

Please read Additional iOS Setup Steps and initialize module: var fb = require('facebook'); fb.permissions = [FACEBOOK_APP_PERMISSIONS]; fb.initialize(); fb.authorize()


2

My answer would be that you did the right choice as I would always recommend to write procedures with all its parameters and avoid using global variables (like C and a1end in your example). However, many people in Fortran use to use global variables and would not bother passing these arguments, sometimes for wrong reason (like "it's faster to write"). But ...


2

That's Babel's doing to correctly implement reference binding of module imports. You can look at the compiled output. Input: export * from 'foo'; Output: 'use strict'; Object.defineProperty(exports, "__esModule", { value: true }); var _foo = require('foo'); Object.keys(_foo).forEach(function (key) { if (key === "default") return; ...


2

Hello Oxana, Additional Android Setup Steps Since Facebook module v4.0.0, for the Android platform, you need to: Add the Facebook Login activity to the Android manifest Add the Facebook App ID to the Android resources string.xml file Create a Facebook proxy and associate it with the current active activity (you need) Manifest: <ti:app> ...


2

I think I made it. The trick was to add the .h files in both source_files and public_header_files in the Pod.podspec. Like this : s.source_files = 'Library.framework/Headers/*.h' s.public_header_files = 'Library.framework/Headers/*.h' This way, all the header files appear in the Pod-umbrella.h and can now be used in my app.


2

Assuming you have a standard copy of TKInter (as in, the one that comes with an install of CPython 3 - indicated by import tkinter and not Tkinter), Canvas is not a module but a class. So Python cannot import from it as Python can only import from modules and packages. As for what you are trying to import (Rectangle, CanvasText, etc.), these seem to be from ...


2

I think you have to include the versioned module individually since you have no package. I don't think the find_package method will find solo modules. Try adding py_modules = ['versioned'] to setup like: setup( name='peewee-versioned', version='0.1.1', packages=find_packages(exclude=['test', 'test.*']), include_package_data=True, ...


2

Drop the brackets after car_data: df <- callModule(linkedScatter, "scatters", car_data, left = reactive(c("cty", "hwy")), right = reactive(c("drv", "hwy")) ) The module seems to want "unresolved" reactives. The brackets "resolves" them.


2

Although the method is Public, the Module (by default) is not. You need to specify this explicitly: Public Module FishTrackerConfigurations


2

Ulf has been working on a fix for that particular problem today. It should land in master pretty soon. In the meantime, you will have to define isZero₁ where the variable in question has been generalised and then use to get isZero₂ isZero₂ : Fin n → Bool isZero₂ = isZero₁ Because writing down the type for your more general functions can be a bit annoying, ...


2

Both 1. and 2. are pretty much identical in your example. You could make 2. make an actual difference by declaring "private" variables in the IIFE's scope, like this: var myObject2 = function () { var myPrivateProp = ...; return { getPrivateProp: function() { return myPrivateProp; } }; }(); In general, those create a value, not ...


2

myObject1 is an object literal (singleton). Useful in cases where you want to have just one object of this type. Look at it as a static object. myObject2 returns an object literal. So right after doing var foo = myObject2(), the variable foo will hold the result { myProp: 1, myFunc: function(){...} } with reference to the parent function that has executed. ...


2

Macros are compile-time constants, you can't influence your core module this way upon installing new modules. You probably want to detect whether additional modules are present in the filesystem and then load them with LoadLibrary (on Windows) or dlopen (on POSIX-conforming systems). A different option would be to let the game developer (i.e. the the engine ...


2

Variables defined in the Babel script are wrapped in their own closure space. It's the same as this: function BabelStuff () { var Test = function () {} } function OtherStuff () { var x = new Test() // Test not defined! } If you're just wanting to get past this problem right now you can add things to the window namespace. window.Test = function(){ ...


2

Your import is correct, but you open the connection in the method main, which you don't run when you use it as a module. Why don't you move these import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import datetime import sqlite3 outside the method to the top of your pulldata.py file, then move this c = sqlite3.connect('Test_db19.db') c.connect() inside your pull_data ...


2

If you run your code from project root folder, you are likely to succeed with import helper or import helper.a. If not, you would have to add current directory to PYTHONPATH: $ export PYTHONPATH="." better use project setup.py Instead of playing with PYTHONPATH (what can be tricky business sometime), you shall create your project as python package. You ...


1

Here's a simple method. You'll need to specify what happens if the function doesn't expect two arguments. for name in dir(math): item = getattr(math, name) if callable(item): item(list[0], list[1])


1

If you just want the name, you could use the "import as" feature: import versioned as peewee_versioned



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