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28

Because the remainder of 3 / 4 = 3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operator If you can't figure out why the remainder is 3, we've got some more serious problems here.


28

if ($count % 20 != 0)


22

n can be arbitrarily large Well, n can't be arbitrarily large - if n >= m, then n! ≡ 0 (mod m) (because m is one of the factors, by the definition of factorial). Assuming n << m and you need an exact value, your algorithm can't get any faster, to my knowledge. However, if n > m/2, you can use the following identity (Wilson's theorem - ...


21

I wasn't quite sure what to expect, but I couldn't figure out how the remainder was 3. So you have 3 cookies, and you want to divide them equally between 4 people. Because there are more people than cookies, nobody gets a cookie (quotient = 0) and you've got a remainder of 3 cookies for yourself. :)


20

Only the modulus operator (%), and fmod are native The modulus operator cannot handle numbers beyond 2^32 (on PHP running x86 architecture) fmod runs faster than bcmod/gmp_mod ~benchmark bcmod doesn't work with floats ~here I believe it is best to use fmod, simply because it's within Math Functions, runs way faster than other function, and most ...


19

MySQL, SQL Server, PostgreSQL, SQLite support using the percent sign as the modulus: WHERE column % 2 = 1 For Oracle, you have to use the MOD function: WHERE MOD(column, 2) = 1


18

Because JavaScript uses floating point math which always leads to rounding errors. If you need an exact result with two decimal places, multiply your numbers with 100 before the operation and then divide again afterwards: var result = ( 4990 % 10 ) / 100; Round if necessary.


18

You do this using the modulus operator, % n % k == 0 evaluates true if and only if n is an exact multiple of k. In elementary maths this is known as the remainder from a division. In your current approach you perform a division and the result will be either always an integer if you use integer division, or always a float if you use floating point ...


17

In PHP the sign of the result of x % y is the sign of dividend which is x but in Perl it is the sign of the divisor which is y. So in PHP the result of $num % 2 can be be either 1, -1 or 0. So fix your function compare the result with 0: function isOdd($num) { return $num % 2 != 0; }


16

quotient = 3 / 2; remainder = 3 % 2; // now you have them both


15

This is the same: if (x % 5 == 3 and y % 5 > 1) or (y % 5 == 3 and x % 5 > 1):


15

(a * b) % c == ((a % c) * (b % c)) % c


15

There are two steps: 0 % 2 evaluates to 0. 0 != 0 evaluates to false. To elaborate on the first step, the JLS defines the % operator like so: The binary % operator is said to yield the remainder of its operands from an implied division; the left-hand operand is the dividend and the right-hand operand is the divisor. The remainder of dividing 0 by 2 ...


15

Short Answer: The standard guarantee that (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a. In C99, the result of division / will truncated toward zero. The result of % operator will be certain, in this case, -1. In C89, the result of division / can be truncated either way for negative operands. So the result of % operator is machine-dependent as well. Long Answer: From C99 ...


14

How about mod, from the page: (mod -1 5) => 4 (mod 13 4) => 1 (mod -13 4) => 3 (mod 13 -4) => -3


14

It seems like a misnomer to me to call it "modulus" and not "remainder" (In math, the answer really should be 9). C calls it the % operator, and calls its result the remainder. C++ copies this from C. Neither language calls it the modulus operator. This also explains why the remainder is negative: because the / operator truncates towards 0, and (a / b) ...


14

When you divide 17/40, quotient is 0 and the remainder is 17. The modulo operator (%) returns the remainder. i.e a % b = remainder of a / b


14

Many contest questions ask you to compute some very, very large number (say, the number of permutations of an 150-element sequence containing some large number of duplicates). Many programming languages don't natively support arbitrary-precision arithmetic, so in the interest of fairness it makes sense for those contests not to ask you for the exact value. ...


13

Watch your order of operations: intVariable1 + 1 % intVariable2; is: intVariable1 + (1 % intVariable2); So 9 + 1 % 10 is being parsed as 9 + (1 % 10). Which gives 9 + 1 = 10. % has higher precedence than +.


12

Basically you're tiling a 5x5 binary pattern. Here's a clear expression of that: pattern = [[0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 1, 0], [0, 0, 1, 1, 1], [0, 0, 0, 1, 0]] for y in range(MAP_HEIGHT): for x in range(MAP_WIDTH): if pattern[x%5][y%5]: ... This is a very simple and ...


12

Much shorter: int i = 3; i = 8 - i; i = 8 - i; And of course, for your 0/1 toggle, you should do this: int i = 0; i = 1 - i; i = 1 - i; And in general, for an a/b toggle, do this: int i = a; i = (a + b) - i; i = (a + b) - i; How does that work? Well, a + b - a is b, and a + b - b is a. :-D


12

You've misused the % operator, which is a binary operator like /. Try if (year % 400 == 0) {


11

3 mod 4 is the remainder when 3 is divided by 4. In this case, 4 goes into 3 zero times with a remainder of 3.


11

From the C standard, section 6.5.5 Multiplicative operators, paragraph 2: The operands of the % operator shall have integer type.


11

int non_smaller_int_divisible_by_16(int x) { return (x + 15) & ~15; } Since 16 is a power of two, you can use binary masking - add 15 so we get the next highest multiple, and mask with the bitwise inverse of 15, to clear the bottom bits. Edit: It's not clear what you want to happen with negative numbers - both your and my code will round to ...


11

some pseudo code function powermod(base, exponent, modulus) { if (base < 1 || exponent < 0 || modulus < 1) return -1 result = 1; while (exponent > 0) { if ((exponent % 2) == 1) { result = (result * base) % modulus; } base = (base * base) % modulus; exponent = floor(exponent / 2); } ...


11

If it's a power of 2, like your example of 2048, you could subtract 1 and do a bitwise-and. That is: n % m == n & (m - 1) ...where m is a power of 2. For example: 22 % 8 = 22 - 16 = 6 22 = 10110 8 = 01000 22 & (8 - 1) = 10110 & 00111 ------- 00110 = 6 Bear in mind that a ...


11

From the PHP docs: Operands of modulus are converted to integers (by stripping the decimal part) before processing. Use fmod if you want to preserve decimal remainders. (Thanks for the link, Oli Charlesworth, wasn't aware that such a function existed.)


11

The problem is that there are either zero solutions (if Math.abs(y) >= 26) or an infinite1 number of values of x that satisfy that equation for a given y. The general answer is: x = 26 * k + y for any integer value of k. You can pick whatever k you want.2 1 In practice, the range will be limited by the range of integer values you are using. If x and y ...


11

There are many tricks that you can do to make modular arithmetic easier. For example, suppose you want to know what 1234567890 mod 17 is, but you don't have a numeric type big enough to represent 1234567890. Well, what do we know about %, assuming all numbers are positive? (a+b)%e == ((a%e)+(b%e))%e (c*d)%e == ((c%e)*(d%e))%e If you don't understand why ...



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