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11

The reason is that Matlab uses double floating-point arithmetic by default. A number as large as 688^79 can't be represented accurately as a double. (The largest integer than can be accurately represented as a double is on the order of 2^53). To obtain the right result you can use symbolic variables, which ensures you don't lose accuracy: >> x = ...


10

Since Python 2.6, enumerate() takes an optional start parameter to indicate where to start the enumeration. See the documentation for enumerate.


9

The closest IEEE 754 64-bit binary number to 0.0003 is 0.0002999999999999999737189393389513725196593441069126129150390625. The closest representable number to the result of multiplying it by 100000 is 29.999999999999996447286321199499070644378662109375. There are a number of operations, such as floor and mod, that can make very low significance differences ...


9

Operator Precedence ( 100 - ((25 * 3) % 4) ) = 97 25*3=75 75 MODULO 4=3 100-3=97 That's it. When you're unsure about operators' priority put parentheses everywhere.


8

Becuase you can multiply by 0: c = 100*0 + 50; It's the + 50 that is returned as modulo.


8

while ( ( a || b ) != 0 ); this is wrong. It should be while ( a != 0 && b != 0 ); On a side note, the Euclid's algorithm can be concisely implemented recursively: int gcd(int a, int b) { return b == 0 ? a : gcd(b, a%b); }


7

Here are two ways to approach this problem. The first one using a common bit-twiddling technique, and if carefully optimized can beat hardware division. The other one substitutes a multiply for the divide, similar to the optimization performed by gcc, and is far and away the fastest. The bottom line is that there's not much point trying to avoid the % ...


6

You already got comments explaining why % is defined for char: it's defined for all integer types, and in C, char is an integer type. Some other languages do define a distinct char type that does not support arithmetic operations, but C is not one of them. But to answer why it isn't defined for floating-point types: history. There is no technical reason why ...


5

According to the VB6/VBA documentation The modulus, or remainder, operator divides number1 by number2 (rounding floating-point numbers to integers) and returns only the remainder as result. For example, in the following expression, A (result) equals 5. A = 19 Mod 6.7 Usually, the data type of result is a Byte, Byte variant, Integer, Integer ...


5

[Edit2] below for performance notes An attempt with only 1 if condition. This approach is O(log2(sizeof unsigned)). Run time would increase by 1 set of ands/shifts/add rather than twice the time with a loop approach should code use uint64_t. unsigned mod31(uint32_t x) { #define m31 (31lu) #define m3131 ((m31 << 5) | m31) #define m31313131 ...


4

Hint: Make use of the equivalence of the following expressions and For further details, see Modular exponentiation in Wikipedia.


4

Just to give the obvious answer: 0.0006 and 0.0003 are not representable in a machine double (at least on modern machines). So you didn't actually multiply by those values, but by some value very close. Slightly more, or slightly less, depending on how the compiler rounded them.


4

You do a modulo (== division) operation, so you need to assure your denominator isn't zero template <class K, class V> void HashMap<K, V>::insert(K key, V value) { std::hash<std::string> stringHash; int intKey = stringHash(key); int bucket = this->size() ? intKey % this->size() : intKey; // or whatever makes sense ...


4

You can utilize the fact, that (N-1) % N == -1. Thus, (65536 * a) % 65537 == -a % 65537. Also, -a % 65537 == -a + 1 (mod 65536), when 0 is interpreted as 65536 uint16_t fastmod65537(uint16_t a, uint16_t b) { uint32_t c; uint16_t hi, lo; if (a == 0) return -b + 1; if (b == 0) return -a + 1; c = (uint32_t)a * (uint32_t)b; ...


4

First, the case where either a or b is zero. In that case, it is interpreted as having the value 2^16, therefore elementary modulo arithmetic tells us that: result = -a - b + 1; , because (in the context of IDEA) the multiplicative inverse of 2^16 is still 2^16, and its lowest 16 bits are all zeroes. The general case is much easier than it seems, now ...


4

12345, Here 5 comes first time. Then you are passing actually 4-1, 3-1, 2-1, 1-1 Use return temp + sumDigits(x) instead of return temp + sumDigits(x - 1) You should also change here: def sumDigits(x): if x <= 0: return 0 Otherwise, it will add extra one


4

Excel columns aren't a normal number system. It's not just base 26. The first two-digit column is "AA". In any normal number system, the first two digit number is composed of two different digits. Basically, in excel column numbering, there is no "zero" digit. To account for this difference, 1 is subtracted at each iteration.


3

I'm not quite sure about your algorithm, but it seems like you try to get every 3rd and 4th post not (starting at 0). The fitting code would be: if(($i % 4 == 0 || $i % 4 == 1) && $i != 0) { /* do stuff */ }


3

Sidenote: If you're curious about the closed form formula: in case you need to pick up a single n-th term from the sequence. Otherwise I would suggest using a modulus (like suggested by @Sebb) if you need it in your loop.


3

n is not an integer. gets() returns a string and chomp removes the newline, but the data is still a string. "6" % 3 != 0 6 % 3 == 0 You need to convert your incoming data to an integer representation.


3

Your term ( a || b ) != 0 will not resolve as you expect. What you want to do is (a != 0) && (b != 0) Or as Cheers and hth. - Alf suggests just a && b.


3

You are going to hate this answer for how obvious it is, but you could just do: if index % 3 == 2: add a horizontal spacer This adds the spacer after the 2nd element (which is actually the third), and every third element after it.


3

With modulus, long long int a = fib(k + 1); long long int b = fib(k); a >= b is not necessary true, (2 * a >= b neither). so return (b * ((2 * a - b) % MOD)) % MOD; may return negative number.


3

It's pretty easy to figure out if you know modular arithmetics, expression (b[n] + 10 * b[n - 1] + ... + 10^k * b[k] + ... + 10^n * b[0]) modulo a which is technically initial problem statement could be simplified to (...((b[0] modulo a) * 10 + b[1]) modulo a) * 10 + ... + b[n]) modulo a which is what your algorithm does. To prove that their equal we may ...


3

My calculator is sending me the same answer than Wolfram, it also calculated the value for 688^79 so I would tend to believe Wolfram is right. You probably have overrun the capacities of Matlab with such a huge number and it is why it did not send the right answer.


3

The double type has lots of precision, 53 bits, but that's not enough to store values as precise as unity at the very high values you're seeing. The values of mToE are the double values that are closest to the true values of calculation. With the Math.ulp method (unit in last place), we can determine the precision of a double value of the magnitude ...


3

It sounds like this could be one of two issues. 1.) You need to set your migrate setting in config/model.js to something besides alter. You should have migrate: 'safe' on in production mode. This should happen automatically if the NODE_ENV variable is set to production. The reason it times out is every time you start the server Sails will try and migrate ...


3

Your calc method is a recursive method. If the result of performing an int division is not 0, i.e. if the number is at least 10, then divide by 10 and call itself. Eventually, you will reach a number that is less than 10. The if condition will be false, and x % 10 will be x itself. But what is x at this point? It's the first digit of the number. Then ...


3

This doesn't have anything to do with the modulo operator. Even i = i++; doesn't work - it takes a value, increments it, and then overwrites it with the initially taken value. See also Difference between i++ and ++i in a loop? for how they work. You probably want to write i = (i + 1) % 3;


3

We know that p is less than max, then n % p is less than max. They are both unsigned, that means that n % p is positive, and smaller than p. Unsigned overflow is well-defined, so if n % p * 2 exceeds p, we can compute it as n % p - p + n % p, which will not overflow, so together it will look like this: unsigned m = n % p; unsigned r; if (p - m < m) // m ...



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