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17

Many contest questions ask you to compute some very, very large number (say, the number of permutations of an 150-element sequence containing some large number of duplicates). Many programming languages don't natively support arbitrary-precision arithmetic, so in the interest of fairness it makes sense for those contests not to ask you for the exact value. ...


11

There are many tricks that you can do to make modular arithmetic easier. For example, suppose you want to know what 1234567890 mod 17 is, but you don't have a numeric type big enough to represent 1234567890. Well, what do we know about %, assuming all numbers are positive? (a+b)%e == ((a%e)+(b%e))%e (c*d)%e == ((c%e)*(d%e))%e If you don't understand why ...


9

In C++ the result of anything mod 0 is undefined behavior, from the draft C++ standard section 5.6 Multiplicative operators paragraph 4 says (emphasis mine): The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second. If the second operand of / or % is zero the ...


9

One solution would be doing a normal division and then comparing the value to the next integer. If the result is that integer or very near to that integer the result is evenly divisible: $x = 70; $y = .1; $evenlyDivisable = abs(($x / $y) - round($x / $y, 0)) < 0.0001; This subtracts both numbers and checks that the absolute difference is smaller than ...


9

Operator Precedence ( 100 - ((25 * 3) % 4) ) = 97 25*3=75 75 MODULO 4=3 100-3=97 That's it. When you're unsure about operators' priority put parentheses everywhere.


9

The closest IEEE 754 64-bit binary number to 0.0003 is 0.0002999999999999999737189393389513725196593441069126129150390625. The closest representable number to the result of multiplying it by 100000 is 29.999999999999996447286321199499070644378662109375. There are a number of operations, such as floor and mod, that can make very low significance differences ...


8

Becuase you can multiply by 0: c = 100*0 + 50; It's the + 50 that is returned as modulo.


8

it is because the compiler's optimization, and this is something todo with your blank loop. But I'm not quite sure where the problem is. To simply solve the question, declare j as: volatile short j; and it will works fine. Cause program will fetch j from memory instead of registers every time. I debugged the assembly code, and find out the program ...


7

Here are two ways to approach this problem. The first one using a common bit-twiddling technique, and if carefully optimized can beat hardware division. The other one substitutes a multiply for the divide, similar to the optimization performed by gcc, and is far and away the fastest. The bottom line is that there's not much point trying to avoid the % ...


6

The optimization of x % N to x & (N-1) only works if N is a power of two. You also need to know that x is positive, otherwise there is a little difference between the bitmask operation and the remainder operation. The bitmask operation produces the remainder for the Euclidean division, which is always positive, whereas % produces the remainder for C's ...


6

You already got comments explaining why % is defined for char: it's defined for all integer types, and in C, char is an integer type. Some other languages do define a distinct char type that does not support arithmetic operations, but C is not one of them. But to answer why it isn't defined for floating-point types: history. There is no technical reason why ...


6

.1 doesn't have an exact representation in binary floating point, which is what causes your incorrect result. You could multiply them by a large enough power of 10 so they are integers, then use %, then convert back. This relies on them not being different by a big enough factor that multiplying by the power of 10 causes one of them to overflow/lose ...


6

It is undefined behavior, because modulo involves a division by zero.


6

An odd numbers has a multiplicative inverse modulo a power of two. The inverse of 16807 mod 216 is 22039. That means that (16807 * 22039) % 65536 == 1, and consequently, that (16807 * 22039 * x) % 65536 == x And k = (22039 * x) % 65536 So you don't have to try anything, you can simply calculate k directly.


6

The simplest way is to use norm: norm(A) You could also do it manually: raise each vector element to 2, sum all results to get a single number, and compute its square root: sqrt(sum(A.^2))


5

if d is == to 1500.72546 then the result of the calculation int d % (int)1000 would be 500.72546 so then implicitly casting to an int would result in a loss of data.


5

There are fast multiplicative inverse algorithms which aren't terribly difficult, but there's also one built into Java: BigInteger.valueOf(e).modInverse(BigInteger.valueOf(eN)).intValue(); The most popular algorithm to compute the multiplicative inverse mod another number is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extended_Euclidean_algorithm#Modular_integers .


5

This is very simple. If you want to round always down: Your required formula is: someLong-someLong%10 It is because someLong%10 is the remainder of someLong divided by 10. If you get this from the original number, you get the downrounded value, which you wanted. The generalizations is also simple: you can use 100, or even 13, if you want. If you want ...


5

According to the VB6/VBA documentation The modulus, or remainder, operator divides number1 by number2 (rounding floating-point numbers to integers) and returns only the remainder as result. For example, in the following expression, A (result) equals 5. A = 19 Mod 6.7 Usually, the data type of result is a Byte, Byte variant, Integer, Integer ...


5

[Edit2] below for performance notes An attempt with only 1 if condition. This approach is O(log2(sizeof unsigned)). Run time would increase by 1 set of ands/shifts/add rather than twice the time with a loop approach should code use uint64_t. unsigned mod31(uint32_t x) { #define m31 (31lu) #define m3131 ((m31 << 5) | m31) #define m31313131 ...


4

Hint: Make use of the equivalence of the following expressions and For further details, see Modular exponentiation in Wikipedia.


4

Just to give the obvious answer: 0.0006 and 0.0003 are not representable in a machine double (at least on modern machines). So you didn't actually multiply by those values, but by some value very close. Slightly more, or slightly less, depending on how the compiler rounded them.


4

You do a modulo (== division) operation, so you need to assure your denominator isn't zero template <class K, class V> void HashMap<K, V>::insert(K key, V value) { std::hash<std::string> stringHash; int intKey = stringHash(key); int bucket = this->size() ? intKey % this->size() : intKey; // or whatever makes sense ...


4

The C11 standard says: 6.5.5:6 When integers are divided, the result of the / operator is the algebraic quotient with any fractional part discarded.(105) If the quotient a/b is representable, the expression (a/b)*b + a%b shall equal a; otherwise, the behavior of both a/b and a%b is undefined. with footnote 105: 105) This is often called ...


4

There is a pure math library in bitbucket : https://bitbucket.org/zdenekdrahos/bn-php The solution will be then : php > require_once 'bn-php/autoload.php'; php > $eval = new \BN\Expression\ExpressionEvaluator(); php > $operators = new \BN\Expression\OperatorsFactory(); php > $eval->setOperators($operators->getOperators(array('%'))); php ...


4

Use the norm function B = norm(A,2); The second parameter indicates you want to use the Euclidean norm


4

When you do, 12345/15 It exactly divides it by 823 times and reminder is zero. There is nothing wrong it with %. Make sure that you want reminder or the result of n/x


4

It causes an SIGFPE. The reason is because of the division by zero: if(number % i == 0) You can fix it here: for(unsigned long i = 1; i < number; ++ i) The SIGFPE will be happening usually on systems with a floating point unit, which raises an exception in this case. The actual behaviour depens on the implmentation details and is undefined. On ...


4

This answer is both a summary of the Josephus Problem and an answer to your questions of: What is josephus(n-1,k) referring to? What is the modulus operator being used for? When calling josephus(n-1,k) that means that you've executed every kth person up to a total of n-1 times. (Changed to match George Tomlinson's comment) The recursion keeps going ...


3

n is not an integer. gets() returns a string and chomp removes the newline, but the data is still a string. "6" % 3 != 0 6 % 3 == 0 You need to convert your incoming data to an integer representation.



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