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There is no real foolproof way to do this in software. Sufficiently motivated and knowledgeable attackers can generally defeat such schemes as long as they have access to the program binary. The only thing you can do is make it harder for them. Using obfuscation techniques, self modifying code, hardware keys, you name it. But keep in mind that such tricks ...


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The research paper you are citing is from the founders of Arxan technologies. They have patents on protecting code in this way, where protection is about preventing people from reverse engineering. Many years prior to Arxan, Intertrust had some similar technologies. I have not studied Arxan in enough depth to understand what is novel about what they are ...


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Error: no chunks found for file, possibly corrupt at /home/developer/rundir/node_modules/mongoose/node_modules/mongodb/lib/mongodb/gridfs/gridstore.js:808:20 at /home/developer/rundir/node_modules/mongoose/node_modules/mongodb/lib/mongodb/gridfs/gridstore.js:586:5 at ...


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well I solved this by hard coding the server's path inside the code var theURL = "http://myServer"; if (process.env.NODE_ENV === "development") { // home theURL = "http://myServer"; // office //theURL = "http://192.168.10.30:3000"; } Meteor.absoluteUrl.defaultOptions.rootUrl = theURL; process.env.ROOT_URL = theURL; ...


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This is generally to do with the way the server is started rather than the app, try specifying --mobile-server with the same address you use to build it when running the server you want to connect the app to: meteor --mobile-server http:/app.server:port If this works or if you don't run the app with the meteor command directly then you can set the ...


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You can calculate the remainder in cents by multiplying up, then applying mod and then dividing back down: ((value * 100) % 8 ) / 100


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I think this solves your problem... >>> 125**(1.0/3), 5.0%1 (4.999999999999999, 0.0) >>> 4.999999999999%1 0.9999999999989999 125**(1.0/3) is really 4.999..., not 5.0. Thus, you're doing 4.999999999999999%1, which gives you the output of .0.9999999999989999, which gets rounded to 1.


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This is operator overloading. What you are talking about is language build-in, but you may overload methods on your own. Eg overload + operator that is decorated in python by __add__ method: class YourMath(object): def __init__(self, param): self.param = param def __add__(self, x): return int(str(self.param) + str(x.param)) # ...



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