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10

The IO actions are happening in the correct order, the problem lies in how input and output pipes work. The string "Enter your name: " is written to the output buffer by putStr before the getLine, but the buffer hasn't necessarily been flushed. Adding hFlush stdout after the putStr will flush the buffer. import System.IO -- MyScript.hs main = do putStr ...


9

You can't have an unsequence :: (Monad m) => m [a] -> [m a]. The problem lies with lists: you can't be sure how may elements you are going to get with a list, and that complicates any reasonable definition of unsequence. Interestingly, if you were absolutely, 100% sure that the list inside the monad is infinite, you could write something like: ...


7

Here's a simple example. Suppose I want to pick a random size for a range, and then pick a random index inside that range, and then return both the range and the index. The second computation of a random value clearly depends on the first—I need to know the size of the range in order to pick a value in the range. This kind of thing is specifically what ...


7

The type I would recommend using is: StateT [Int] Maybe Int A really simple way to use Maybe/MaybeT is to just call mzero whenever you want to fail and mplus whenever you want to recover from a failed computation. This works even if they are layered within other monad transformers. Here's an example: addState' :: StateT [Int] Maybe Int addState' = do ...


7

The definition you are looking for reads something like Concurrent h >>= k = Concurrent (\f -> h (\x -> runConcurrent (k x) f)) How did we get there? As always, we let the types do the work. :) Let us first introduce a helper function: runConcurrent :: Concurrent b -> (b -> Action) -> Action runConcurrent ...


6

The identity function id :: a -> a, or explicitly \x -> x is polymorphic. This means it can be specialized to any type which you construct by substituting some type for a. In your case (>>= id) the compiler looks at the type of the second argument of (>>=) :: m c -> (c -> m d) -> m d and at the type of id and tries to unify ...


6

Those two types mean very different things. List[Option[T]] looks like an intermediate result that would you would flatten. (I'd look into using flatMap in this case.) The second type, Option[List[T]] says there may or may not be a list. This would be a good type to use when you need to distinguish between the "no result" case and the "result is an empty ...


6

It is indeed not possible to create an unsequence function using monads alone. The reason is: You can safely and easily create a monadic structure from a value using return. However, it is not safe to remove a value from a monadic structure. For example you can't remove an element from an empty list (i.e. a function of the type [a] -> a is not safe). ...


6

There's something of a syntax trick going on here. It might be easier to think of (->) e as (e ->) or, even more clearly, if we write type Arr a b = a -> b then (->) e is about the same as Arr e. So what is the type of ret? It ends up as ret :: a -> (e -> a) which should be more solvable now.


5

The simplest thing is to use module-level encapsulation. Something like this: module Game (Game, loadResource) where data GameState -- = ... newtype Game = Game { runGame :: StateT GameState IO a } io :: IO a -> Game a io = Game . liftIO loadResource :: IO a -> Game (Game a) loadResource action = io $ do v <- newEmptyMVar forkIO (action ...


5

Whether or not an implementation of Zero is needed is determined by how the if statement is translated into function calls from the monadic syntax. If both branches of an if are syntactically computation expressions then the translation does not involve Zero. In the case that one of the branches is not syntactically a computation expression or is missing the ...


5

a, m and b are type variables and there is nothing that prevents a from being equal to m b in a given situation. That's the idea of polymorphism: if something has type a without any more constraints on a, then it also has type Int, and [[Bool]], and c -> [Int] -> d, and (like here) m b. So for this specific call, a ~ [Int], b ~ Int, m ~ [], and ...


5

No. The void functor data V a is differentiable, but return cannot be implemented for it.


4

For Applicatives, there's Lift from the transformers package. Lift adds an explicitly pure computation to an already existing Applicative, and provides "optimized" implementations for <*> for cases when one or both of the arguments are explicitly pure. This can be useful when the <*> operation of the base Applicative is expensive in some way. ...


4

It cannot be a Monad, because it is not even a Functor, since you have a type variable in the contravariant position. This means you cannot implement: fmap :: (a->b)->MyType a->MyType b You can use f :: a->b to change the type of result in a->a to a->b, but you can't change the type of the argument to that function to get b->b, which ...


4

I'm not sure what you actually want to do. If you simply want to get the code sample add5 7 >>= add7 to work and produce a result of 19 by adding the numbers in the "obvious" way, then it is simple, and any monad will do. We can thus pick the simplest possible monad, the "identity" monad: newtype Id a = Id { runId :: a } instance Monad Id where ...


4

This would be a lot easier to understand if Haskell allowed type operator sections, IMO. The type a -> b Is equivalent to (->) a b So that means that (->) a Is the same as (a ->) It's essentially saying that it's the function type parameterized over its output type. So this means that we should have ret :: a -> (((->) r) a) ...


4

A summary first Futures can be monad-like if you never construct them with effectful blocks, but this isn't how people use them in practice. So for most people using effectful Futures, they simply aren't monads. To have a monadic Future, you have to restrict yourself to simple computations that perform no input or output. Fortunately, a library called ...


3

As the other commenters have suggested, you are mistaken. Scala's Future type has the monadic properties: import scala.concurrent.Future import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits._ def unit[A](block: => A): Future[A] = Future(block) def bind[A, B](fut: Future[A])(fun: A => Future[B]): Future[B] = fut.flatMap(fun) This is why you can use ...


3

Monads and especially monad transformers come from trying to build complicated programs out of simpler pieces. An additional transformer for the new responsibility is an idiomatic way of handling this problem in Haskell. There's more than one way to deal with transformer stacks. Since you are already using mtl in your code, I'll assume you are comfortable ...


3

Problem to make the last monadic: addStuff = (*2) >>= \a -> (+10) >>= \b -> return (a + b)


3

One of the benefit is that you will get a lot of useful methods defined in MonadOps. For example, Rng.double.iterateUntil(_ < 0.1) will produce only the values that are less than 0.1 (while the values greater than 0.1 will be skipped). iterateUntil can be used for generation of distribution samples using a rejection method. E.g. this is the code that ...


3

The easiest way would be with join: main = join $ parseArgs <$> getArgs <*> getStdGen Personally, I would prefer the form main = join $ liftM2 parseArgs getArgs getStdGen where join :: Monad m => m (m a) -> m a liftM2 :: Monad m => (a -> b -> r) -> m a -> m b -> m r Or just use a do main = do args <- ...


3

You can define an operator for this: infixl 4 <&> (<&>) :: Monad m => m (a -> m b) -> m a -> m b f <&> x = f >>= (x >>=) If you have a function of type f :: Monad m => (a1 -> a2 -> ... -> an -> m b) -> m a1 -> m a2 -> ... -> m an -> m b then you can write fx :: Monad ...


3

If you note that m (n _) is a monad transformer then you can define this operation. This is certainly the case when we notice that IO (Maybe a) is the same as MaybeT IO a: we then just use MaybeT's join. We can do this in no small part due to the fact that Maybe and IO "layer" especially nicely. On the other hand, not all "composed" monads are monad ...


3

Measure is already defined in a following way: newtype Measure a = Measure { unMeasure :: [Cond] -> Sampler (a, [Cond]) } You can see that there is no place to store your Int, so you cannot make it a proper instance of MonadState. If you want to extend Measure to MonadState, you can use StateT monad transformer: test :: StateT Int Measure Int test = ...


3

You are on the wrong track. MyType cannot be a monad. The only monad instance implementation possible for MyType will be fairly trivial, and not able to make add5 7 >>= add7 equal 19. >>= must have type MyType a -> (a -> MyType b) -> MyType b -- remove newType (a -> a) -> (a -> (b -> b)) -> (b -> b) The only ...


3

This comes down to the definition of >>=. You should note that do --- for the features used here --- is just thin syntax sugar for a call to >>=: do x <- pop pop = pop >>= \ x -> pop and (ignoring newtype wrappers) >>= is defined for State as: a >>= f = \ s -> case a s of (x, s') -> f x s' So f gets ...


2

Let's build the handy old Mealy machine data Mealy i o where Mealy :: (i -> s -> (i, s)) -> s -> Mealy i o which has all kinds of instances instance Arrow Mealy instance ArrowChoice Mealy instance ArrowApply Mealy instance Strong Mealy instance Choice Mealy instance Profunctor Mealy instance Category * Mealy instance Monad (Mealy a) ...


2

As @danidiaz wrote, for applicative functors, there already is Lift. However, monads (unlike applicative functors) don't compose, so for this it'll be necessary to create a monad transformer: import Control.Monad import Control.Monad.Trans data Impure m a = Pure a | Impure (m a) instance (Monad m) => Monad (Impure m) where return = Pure (Pure ...



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