Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

According to this issue in the bug tracker the old definition does not obey the associative law. Although I know little about such things, I suspect an other problem is redundancy: Pure a Plus [Pure a] Plus [Plus [Pure a]] ... all seem to represent the same thing. Free structures are generally supposed to be unique. There are times when they cannot be ...


12

First note that this has nothing whatsoever to do with IO. It has to do with monads, but with a very specific one: the list monad. instance Monad [] where return x = [x] f >>= xs = concat $ map f xs -- aka `(>>=) = concatMap`. It is best know for list comprehensions, which are basically syntactic sugar†: [ result x y z | x <- ...


12

Here is a very simple example of something one can do with Alternative: import Control.Applicative import Data.Foldable data Nested f a = Leaf a | Branch (Nested f (f a)) flatten :: (Foldable f, Alternative f) => Nested f a -> f a flatten (Leaf x) = pure x flatten (Branch b) = asum (flatten b) Now let's try the same thing with Monoid: ...


9

Your tutorial is from 2006. It uses a very old version of Data.Map in which lookup's type indeed was: lookup :: (Monad m, Ord k) => k -> Map k a -> m a I reckon the change happened because fail is widely considered to be a wart in the Monad class. Returning a Maybe a makes a lookup failure explicit and manageable. Making it implicit by hiding it ...


9

Given your corrected definition, if I try to define and then use x, I get the expected runtime exception: λ> let x = pure 5 >>= pure :: X Int Int λ> runX x 5 5 *** Exception: foo.hs:12:10-20: No instance nor default method for class operation GHC.Base.>>= There are two possible reasons why you would not see that. The first is that you ...


7

I like to think of continuations as programs with holes in them. I think I originally gleaned this insight from Tekmo's blog. Check out this little continuation: import Control.Monad.Trans.Cont program :: ContT () IO Char program = ContT $ \doThing -> do c <- getChar doThing c It's a program that's 'missing a piece' - namely, what to do with ...


6

This kind of “combination of two monads” is an extremely common thing in Haskell. Fortunately, the language is flexible enough that we can nicely abstract over this. Mathematically speaking what you want is a composition of two functors. Instead of that newtype, this is usually expressed with the concept of transformers: instead of using the ...


6

There isn't an obvious way to do so. You could cobble together something with the right type using functions like sample and sync or updates and executeSyncIO/executeAsyncIO, but it probably wouldn't obey the Monad laws. There isn't a more general solution for a (b (a (b c))) -> a (b c)), but there is if b is Traversable, which lets you rearrange things ...


5

You're close. Let's follow the types with type holes (_s): impuree :: String -> PlayMIO String impuree s = do a <- _ . runIdentity . runExceptT $ puree s return $ "aa" ++ a This tells us we need a type: Test.hs:15:8: Found hole ‘_’ with type: m0 (Either String String) -> ExceptT String IO [Char] Where: ‘m0’ is an ambiguous type ...


5

The real key to understanding monads is to stop trying to say A monad is X and instead start saying X is a monad Something is a monad if it has a certain structure and obeys certain laws. For the purpose of programming in Haskell, something is a Monad if it has the right kind and types and obeys the Monad laws. return a >>= f ≡ f a m ...


5

I don't know what clever combinators you could use to build this out of the standard library, but at the risk of stating the obvious it is pretty easy to implement yourself: bind2 :: Monad m => (a -> b -> m c) -> m a -> m b -> m c bind2 f ma mb = do a <- ma b <- mb f a b > bind2 (\a b -> [a,b]) [1,2,3] [4,5,6] ...


4

First, you can not define a function in the way you posted for the same reason you can not implement a predecessor function as follows: 1 + (predecessor x) = x Functions can only be defined through equations of the form f pattern1 .. patternK = expression Note that f must be found at the top-level. For your factorial function using the continuation ...


4

There are a couple of libraries that define similar effect systems for Haskell. I have worked some with extensible-effects, and found it quite easy to add restricted IO, eg STDIO, FileIO, effects. The lack of compiler support makes is slightly less nice to use. If you want to try it out you can find inspiration in existing effects for the ...


4

There is a function alexScanTokens :: String -> [token] which you can use. It's defined in the file templates/wrappers.hs Here's a monadic version I found here: alexScanTokens :: String -> Either String [Keyword] alexScanTokens inp = runAlex inp gather where gather = do t <- alexMonadScan case trace (show t) t of EOF -> ...


4

You can't escape from IO, but inside a do block you're not actually escaping per se. Loosely: when you write g <- newStdGen in a do block, you can then use g later in the block as if it just had type StdGen, instead of IO StdGen. At the end of the block, whatever you return will be wrapped back up in IO.


3

Can someone give a full example of pure functional random number generator in Scala and perhaps relate it to state Monad in general. This is a purely functional RNG. val state0 = RNG.simple(1234) val (r1, state1) = state0.nextInt val (r2, state2) = state1.nextInt // etc. val (x, _) = state1.nextInt assert (x == r2)


3

You are trying to reinvent pipes. Your source and yield are pipes await and yield. The other two concerns you are trying to handle are a ReaderT and a WriterT respectively. If you put the entire list of inputs in the environment of the ReaderT you can run local sub computations that start over at the beginning of the list. You can collect all of the results ...


3

If you just want to do the conversion, why not use if/else? def wrap[A](s: Seq[A]) = if (s.isEmpty) None else Some(s) Alternatively, you can define your own maxOpt method: implicit def seqWithMaxOpt[A:Ordering](s:Seq[A]) = new { def maxOpt = Try(s.max).toOption } And call it like so val s:Seq[Int] = Seq() s.maxOpt In the same manner, you could add ...


3

The functional alternative to mutating variables is to return an updated value from a function. Stateful computations can be modelled by functions which take the current value of the state and return a pair containing the result and the updated value of the state. You can define such a type in F# as type State<'s, 'a> = S of ('s -> ('s * 'a)) ...


3

If I understand you correctly, you want to define a lens tlens s.t.: gets tlens is the same as: do tvar <- gets squares sqs <- liftIO $ atomically $ readTVar tvar return sqs and where puts tlens sqs is the same as: do tvar <- gets squares liftIO $ atomically $ writeTVar tvar sqs I think this can be answered by looking at the type ...


3

That random generator RNG is pure functional, for the same inputs you get always the same outputs. The non-pure-functional part is left for the user of that API (you). To use the RNG in a pure-functional way you have to initialize it always with the same initial value, but then you will always get the same sequence of numbers, which is not so useful. ...


3

As I mentioned in my comment, the scalaz NonEmptyList class could be helpful to you. By importing the scalaz pimping, you get access to the toNel method that you can call on a List. If this list is indeed empty, you can not continue to map over it. If it's not empty, you can indeed map over it. Consider the following example: import scalaz._ import ...


3

As @bheklilr said in his comment, you can't use IO from State. The reason for that, basically, is that State (which is just shorthand for StateT over Identity) is no magic, so it's not going to be able to use anything more than What you can already do in its base monad, Identity The new operations provided by State itself However, that first point also ...


3

You can use EitherT.eitherT(...) or just EitherT(...): import scalaz._, Scalaz._ val futDisjunction: Future[String \/ Int] = Future.successful(\/-(5)) scala> EitherT(futDisjunction) // scalaz.EitherT[scala.concurrent.Future,String,Int]


2

update for your edit with the MonadRandom I think all you need is mapM: import System.Random (randomRIO) f :: Int -> IO Int f n = randomRIO (n,n+n) g :: [Int] -> IO [Int] g xs = mapM f xs example λ> g [1..3] [1,4,5] λ> g [1..3] [1,3,4] λ> g [1..3] [1,4,6] btw: of course you can do this yourself using do: g :: [Int] -> IO [Int] g ...


2

As of base 4.6, the instance is in Data.Either itself.


2

OK so here's a version of the restartableStateT hack for your example: {-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-} {-# LANGUAGE Rank2Types #-} module Main where import Data.Monoid import Data.String (fromString) import Web.Spock.Safe import qualified Control.Monad.State as S import Data.IORef storeData :: (Monad m) => String -> S.StateT String m String ...


2

You can extend Seq with your safe methods via implicit class: implicit class SafeSeq[T](s: Seq[T]) { def safeMax(implicit cmp: Ordering[T]): Option[T] = if (s.isEmpty) None else Some(s.max) //other safe operations you want } println(Seq.empty[Int].safeMax.map(_ + 42)) // None println(Seq(1).safeMax.map(_ + 42)) // ...


2

In addition, your example nicely combines with Scala streams: def randStream(r: RNG): Stream[Int] = r.nextInt match { case (value, next) => value #:: randStream(next) } val rng = randStream(RNG.simple(123)) println(rng.take(10).toList) println(rng.take(5).toList)


2

Big thanks to Carsten for the link to foldM! Credit to them for the insight of this answer. So, if we use foldM, we can write a function that repeatedly performs a lookup chained through multiple directories that depend upon each previous result. If, thanks to the use of monads, at any point lookup cannot find the current key in a directory, it will ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible